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Metalmelter
06-24-2009, 01:01 PM
Hi folks,

Just a general question on moving a full size, approx.2200lb, mill in a box truck. Has anyone done that?

I have the same mill at homel but just may get another this weekend for free and the panic is full on by the company to get rid of it ASAP. I know all about rolling on pipes, etc and i have the needed heavy duty straps and Johnson bar to get things moving safely. But I'm worried a small foot print like the bridgeport has will go through the floor of the truck.

I used to work warehousing years ago and driving the full sized Datsun forklifts right onto the wooden floor, 45ft truck trailers was no big deal. And rolls of paper headed for the mill were HEAVY. So should I not be worried? I'm thinking one of the Penske trucks or similar with no lift gate is what I will find when I get there. :rolleyes:

JCD
06-24-2009, 01:26 PM
lower the knee all the way
Center the table
Move table close to the column
Depending on the mill, if it will clear the table, turn the head upside down

Metalmelter
06-24-2009, 01:44 PM
Thanks JCD,

Do you think the truck can handle that amount of weight without any problems?

SteveF
06-24-2009, 02:26 PM
I moved a BP series 1 in a 24' Penske truck although I had the head and table off (about 200 lbs each). No problems.

If you think of the PSI point load on the floor from a refrigerator on a dolly, the BP load isn't bad.

Steve.

Scishopguy
06-24-2009, 02:36 PM
Be sure to look over the truck you intend to rent. A lot of the more consumer oriented trucks are not up to the job. Years ago, when I was working for a tool and die company, they rented a 26' U-Haul to move a set of dies to the plant that was to run them. When the forklift crossed the dock plate, it went crashing through the floor of the bed. Most commercial duty trucks have steel under the wooden floor. U-Haul, not so much. :D

If it was me, I would lag bolt the mill to a large pallet that gives a larger footprint. My mill was shipped in short semi trailer (a pup, they called it) and tipped on its side, even though it was lashed down and had a 4x4 in the vise to keep it from shifting side to side. Something I discovered was that the jostling from the road loosened up every nut and bolt on the machine. Anyway, the pallet would have stopped it from tipping. Best of luck with yours.

MickeyD
06-24-2009, 03:15 PM
I think it would be easier to carry it on something like a little twin axle open U-Haul trailer if you are going to rent something. I have moved a couple on them as well as a single axle (3500 pound axle) pipe trailer with no problems. I recently bought a Deckel FP1 that weighed about 1700 with accessories and carried it in the back of my pickup without any problems. I know the Deckel is lighter, but there was at least another 500 pounds between the toolbox and crap in it. Drive easy and tie it well and you will do fine. I ran 90 on I-10 for about 200 miles loaded like that and the only problem was a lack of good radio stations in West Texas.

rockrat
06-24-2009, 03:22 PM
Indeed check out the truck first. Some of the smaller trucks around here have a nice frame running under the box to the back. Get the mill centered on that frame from the start. Also, inspect the floor boards. If they just put plywood down you might try a different route. There may be enough wood in the plywood floor to get the mill on the truck. If so, (as noted before) get something to roll the mill onto that will distribute the load out to the frame.

Remember you have bumps to go over so the floor is not just seeing 2200 lbs static but a dynamic load as well.

Next, check the height of the box as well as the mill. I got a truck over to get a machine and found that the box was 8" shorter than what they told me. They hooked me up with a taller truck for the same price but I was only driving 30 miles.

What do you plan on lashing the mill to on the inside? Not those rails that run along the inside of the box? This is where something to distribute the load out along the floor helps. Wider is better. Lash the mill to something inside to keep it from moving around and then also lash it to the wide load distribution item that it is sitting on. You think moving the mill upright is tough? Try moving one on its side.

Are you sure that you cant get a trailer of some sort? Rental places around here will rent you a trailer and a truck that will pull it. Double check, it could save you some grief.

Looks as though there are sunbelt rentals in Philly but that may be a bit of a drive for you. So look local for a rantal place.
rock~

Metalmelter
06-24-2009, 03:39 PM
Thanks for the responses. The truck wont be the uhaul type. Budget or Penske with a lift gate I'm told. There is no means to take it off the loading dock down to a trailer so the truck is it I'm afraid. I'm gonna roller her in on pipes, lower in onto the bed and secure with straps. That's all I can do. Back at the house I have a backhoe to ease it off the lift gate to the shop.

I'll let you know how it goes when I'm done :rolleyes:

pcarpenter
06-24-2009, 04:05 PM
You could pre-drill some 4x4's with holes in the right locations and countersink for the bolt heads under the bottom. Lift the mill, slide the 4x4's under and set it back down. Now you are on skids...and the skids will both prevent tipping (run the direction of the table) and give you something to slide/roll on. They will also spread the load in the truck.

The trouble with pipe rollers is that they are worthless on a Bridgeport. The base has "feet" at the corners and the pipes drop in the middle. Likewise, my experience with "skates" (machinery rollers) was also dismal.

In addition to lowering the knee all the way, you can also invert the head, lowering several hundred pounds down to the table level. In the case of the 2J head, the top of the belthousing can be set to just touch the table, when inverted. Find a manual for the *proper* procedure for inverting the head...it takes two people to do it without damaging the stop/worm gear arrangement.

Paul

Dawai
06-24-2009, 04:23 PM
Having tie downs is as important as anything.

The penske truck I rented to go get my cnc mill. it didn't have any tie downs of substantial worth. It did have a catipillar engine and a sixteen speed auto.

I took about twenty straps and tied it like a spiders web to the box tie offs.. a one by hardwood board run the perimeter..

If I had hit something, the 4,000lb mill would have cleaned the cab off the truck with me in the middle. End of game, no punt.

A low trailer makes more sense. A equipment trailer or lowboy such as I use here..

when loading, lower the table, center the sliding head if it has one, put 2x4 blocks under the head-Vee ways and lift it there. When you lift it do not lift it by the table. I kept telling my partner on moving a cnc mill if he did that we could just not unload it and scrap it.

There is a lifting diagram on the bridgeport manual.. At one time I had made a set of skates to lift the mill up about a inch and slide them under the sides of the pedastel.. No reason to go that overboard.

Dawai
06-24-2009, 04:31 PM
http://www.bbssystem.com/manuals/bridgeport-manual.pdf

Refer to picture 1.1 installation, lifting.. where the rope sling is, put 2x4s to cushion vee's.. then put fork truck forks under the ways and lift..

It has worked for me several times.. I see the millwrights load them without cushions. Machine is topheavy.. lifting up high on the center of gravity just makes the most sense.

You can take a couple 5/8" solid bars and a crowbar and move the machine to any spot you want on a concrete floor.. pry up one end, roll a bar crossways under pedastel, go to the other end and pry it half inch at a time.. when it is ready to roll off one, insert another, keep fingers on hands.. not between bar and floor (shear points).

pcarpenter
06-24-2009, 04:59 PM
That's what I was getting at, David. The rollers will not roll from one end to the other. At each corner is a raised (if looking at the bottom) "foot" that the mill sets on. In between these is maybe half an inch lower. The feet are maybe 6" from the front and 6" from the rear, so it rolls 6" drops down, rolls some more, and then the roller is trapped from rolling out the back.

This and the high center of gravity were the reasons I recommended bolting the base to a pair of maybe 6' long 4x4's.

The BP also has a tapped hole for a *forged* lifting eye. I want to say it's 5/8" if I recall correctly...or maybe it was 9/16"...I just dont' recall except that it was a bit odd. I used this when I lifted mine.

P.S. I just looked and realized that I may be confused. I thought the OP said it was a Bridgeport. Turns out I got that from another post. The base may indeed be flat, then and rollers will work fine.

Edit-- OK...I'm not crazy. The title of the thread is "Moving Bridgeport mill - general question"-- so back to the advice about the base...rollers are not going to work well.

Paul

gnm109
06-24-2009, 05:05 PM
I think it would be easier to carry it on something like a little twin axle open U-Haul trailer if you are going to rent something. I have moved a couple on them as well as a single axle (3500 pound axle) pipe trailer with no problems. I recently bought a Deckel FP1 that weighed about 1700 with accessories and carried it in the back of my pickup without any problems. I know the Deckel is lighter, but there was at least another 500 pounds between the toolbox and crap in it. Drive easy and tie it well and you will do fine. I ran 90 on I-10 for about 200 miles loaded like that and the only problem was a lack of good radio stations in West Texas.


I agree. A trailer is a much better deal since you don't have to worry about overhead clearance. They generally have strong floors, too.

In April, we moved my new to me Webb Mill 150 miles on a two axle, flatbed open trailer. It had electric brakes. We had no problem at all. A local rigger spotted it on the trailer for us and we put in in place on my end with a forklift.

According the the Webb Manual and their website, this machine weighs in at 3,500 pounds. Here's a picture just berfore we tied it down to leave the area. We pulled the trailer with a medium-sized GMC Diesel truck.


Good luck.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/MachineryWebbMillB.jpg

Metalmelter
06-24-2009, 07:07 PM
Hi folks,

Thanks for all the feedback. My original question is, and maybe I worded it wrong, do you think a Bridgeport mill would stand up in one of those Box trucks from lets say Penske or Budget with a lift gate installed? Not the uHaul ones for sure.

The reason I ask is I don't want it going through the floor:rolleyes: lol

The BP I have indeed does have a flat bottom and I rolled it around without any problems on 3/4" pipe and a crow bar. I won't have an issue getting into the truck off a loading dock - roll it into the truck. There is no way to bring it off the dock onto a trailer and such. I have to do it this way. It's basically-here's the mill, you got one day notice to take it or leave it - it's free - as well as the truck to haul it. They need that truck for other things too so no choice there.

So do you think these trucks are built well enough to withstand the weight of a big BP?

I like the idea of 4x4's to guard against tip over and I'm gonna do that and plenty of good strapping to boot.

Thanks!

tattoomike68
06-24-2009, 07:34 PM
Be sure to look over the truck you intend to rent. A lot of the more consumer oriented trucks are not up to the job. Years ago, when I was working for a tool and die company, they rented a 26' U-Haul to move a set of dies to the plant that was to run them. When the forklift crossed the dock plate, it went crashing through the floor of the bed. Most commercial duty trucks have steel under the wooden floor. U-Haul, not so much. :D

If it was me, I would lag bolt the mill to a large pallet that gives a larger footprint. My mill was shipped in short semi trailer (a pup, they called it) and tipped on its side, even though it was lashed down and had a 4x4 in the vise to keep it from shifting side to side. Something I discovered was that the jostling from the road loosened up every nut and bolt on the machine. Anyway, the pallet would have stopped it from tipping. Best of luck with yours.



If it was me, I would lag bolt the mill to a large pallet that gives a larger footprint.

Amen to that, dont even take the chance of failure, a beefy pallet is cheap and easy to make.

Scishopguy knows whats up and offers very good advice.

MickeyD
06-24-2009, 10:14 PM
I would be very careful using a liftgate. When you get close to their limits, while they will lift smoothly, going down is another matter. I have seen several go into a jerky, tilting, almost freefall on the way down, not the way that I would want to unload a mill. If you have to use an unknown liftgate, make sure that the mill is bolted down on a big pallet and cannot come loose, and be sure that it is rated high enough that you have a big safety margin. I would not try it on one less than rated for 3K and I would be happier with one rated for 4K.

When I replaced my old Bridgeport CNC with a VMC, I hauled the old mill to the buyers facility on my trailer. Got over there and their forklift would not start, so we backed it up to a 40 foot trailer with a 8x8 liftgate and winched it off of my trailer onto their gate. In the process of going down about 18 inches, it started bouncing and if it had not been on a pallet it would have tipped over. Still scared the crap out of everyone. Between that one and several others that I have used, that is why I don't like old unknown gates.

hardtail
06-25-2009, 01:13 AM
To the original question yes they likely are a strong enough floor and big enough door height to work.......but there are gems of wisdom being offered here. Placing it on a heavy pallet really helps to your advantage, both in load distribution, stabilization and unloading later at the destination.

I had one shipped west at 3200#'s from Toronto to Edmonton and it arrived safe at something like 2000 miles on a pallet. Then we removed the pallet and loaded it onto a heavy carhauler just like gnm109, having it down low really helped the final transport home and unloading.......

David offers the best advice though, sling the mill as outlined in the manufacturers brochure and lower it from the loading dock with the forklift down into the specialty designed equipment trailers like the sunbelts........it can't get easier than that.

Rustybolt
06-25-2009, 06:46 PM
I did it this way on a rental truck acouple of times. Not strictly kosher, but I had to move the mill. Once in the truck I blocked the base all around with 2x4s and bugle head screws. The wood on the floor of the truck was some kind of swamp oak so I pre drilled for the screws. Use every tie down on thr truck and make some more using pieces of hardwood and screw or lagbolt to the floor of the truck. Now heres the imoportant part. When you're all done get yourself some wood putty and fill the holes and dirty them up.

gda
06-25-2009, 08:49 PM
I've moved mills twice using rented Home Depot trucks . $19 for 75 minutes. Well worth it. Loaded with a fork truck - unloaded with a backhoe. Lagged to a pallet.

http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd48/tool_collector/moving%20machines/061208-4.jpg

fasto
06-26-2009, 12:53 AM
To answer your question:

YES a 24' box truck can easily handle a BP mill, or bigger. I moved my 4,000 pound horizontal mill an a 24' box truck.

Were I you, I'd pick the BP up and put some long 4x4's under it to increase it's footprint. The side effect is you can pick it up with a pallet jack.
http://www.psinteg.net/files/b&s_how_to_move.JPG