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uncle pete
06-30-2009, 11:09 PM
I've asked a fair amount of questions here over the years and have always gotten very good help, So to return a little bit back, I'd like to recommend some books that I've learned a lot from. I'm hoping others will list there favorite machinist's books too. All of these books will help the beginner and the very experienced. So here's my favorites.
"The Model Engineers Worshop Manual" By George H. Thomas.
"Workshop Techniques" By the same author.
All three "Machinist's Bedside Reader" books by Guy Lataurd.
"How to Run a Lathe" By South Bend Lathes.
"Machinery's Handbook" Any current or older copy is a must in my opinion.
Also a lot of the hard cover books published by our host's here "Village Press"

So would anybody else like to list there own favorites? I'm sure a person new to machining would appreciate a list of books that are well worth buying.

Pete

moldmonkey
07-01-2009, 01:43 AM
An oldie but goodie. Line shaft era but it all still applies. ANDVANCED MACHINE WORK (http://www.lindsaybks.com/bks/advmach/index.html) by Robert Smith is very good. Unusual in that it gives step-by-step instructions and how long it should take.:)

The KENNETH COPE BOOKS (http://search.cartserver.com/search/search.cgi?cartid=p-3009&category=astragal&maxhits=20&keywords=Cope) are great for the history of the American makers of precision tools and machine tools.

The WORKSHOP PRACTICE SERIES (http://www.blueridgeshoponline.com/category.sc?categoryId=3) books are good and geared for the home shop. I only have a few. #1,#19, & #28 by Tubal Cain are good. Spindles by Sanhu is also good. UK members correct me if I'm wrong but I believe they are a "spin-off" of articles for Model Engineer and Model Engineer's Workshop.

Thomas Staubo
07-01-2009, 08:43 AM
Advanced Machine Work by Robert Smith is available for free here:
http://www.archive.org/details/textbookofadvanc00smituoft

Looks like a great book. You can download it in multiple formats or just read it online.


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Michael Edwards
07-01-2009, 08:51 AM
One of my favs is Machine Shop Practice by K.H. Moltrecht vol 1 & 2. About 500 pages each, covers a lot of different things including shaper info.

ME

OLDHORSESHOE
07-01-2009, 09:22 AM
I would add to that list the following:
Machine Shop Trade Secrets by James A. Harvey
Shop Theory published by Henry Ford Trade schools
Both books by J. Randolph Bulgin --- Randolph's Shop and Building Shop

I have also found useful the books published by the United States Navy (and probably other service branches.)

I have a special appreciation for people who take the time to produce books which allow them to share their work experiences. I have never seen a book depicting the wrong way to do things but that would be interesting as well.

Evan
07-01-2009, 09:29 AM
If you are in to designing your own mechanical systems whatever they are I highly recommend Elements of Mechanism by Schawmb et. al. I have the revised 1952 hardcover edition but you can download the earlier 1921 edition for free here:

http://www.archive.org/details/elementsofmechan00schwrich

It's a 62mb PDF but you can preview it by reading online first. It covers everything from the design of Ackerman steering geometry to clock gear trains to Watt's linkage to camshafts to involute gears, all with analysis and formulae and drawings.

uncle pete
07-01-2009, 10:56 AM
Evan, Thanks for the heads up on that book, Some good stuff there.

Pete

lazlo
07-01-2009, 11:28 AM
Pete, I have (and read :) ), just about every machine shop text that I've ever seen mentioned here and on PM, and that's a great list. My favorite overall text is Moltrecht though, and Cincinnati "A Treatise on Milling and Milling Machines" is by far the best milling book I've run across.

Robert Smith's "Advanced Machine Work" is excellent, although very dated -- the version that a lot of folks have is Lindsay's reprint of the 1925 Edition, so all the lathe tool geometries, speeds and feeds, are for carbon steel tools, it spends a lot of time describing the Gooseneck and tangential toolholders because the lathes of the day were floppy. I found the 12th (last) edition, from 1940, for $4 on Abe Books, and it's been substantially modernized and extended.

If you like Geo Thomas' books (I do!), J.A. Radford's "Improvements and Accessories for Your Lathe" is outstanding, and Radford and Thomas cross-reference each other.

The best encyclopedia of practical/useful mechanisms I've seen is Sclater's "Mechanisms and Mechanical Devices Sourcebook (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0071467610/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=304485901&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=0071361693&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0NNYWGX3JKD5RDBZNC8P)." The cover of the 4th Ed shows servos and robot arms to imply that it's been modernized, but the majority of the book covers Geneva Mechanisms, eccentrics, linkages, reciprocal motion, ...

It's not cheap, but it's beautifully illustrated, and well documented. Since it was also sold in electronic form, I've seen the PDF floating around too:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51c0rZfmI9L._SS500_.jpg

uncle pete
07-01-2009, 11:36 AM
Lazlo, Yeah I have the Radford book and forgot to list it. Also agree with you about it.

Pete

lazlo
07-01-2009, 11:43 AM
Forgot to add: Tiffie and Sir John turned me on to the Engineer's Black Book -- a much more useful version of the Machinery's Handbook.

John Stevenson
07-01-2009, 12:03 PM
Over here and I think in OZ we have the Zeus book.
Pocket sized book, laminated pages about 26, with thread charts, decimal trig, sheet metal bending etc, cost about 5 and is probably on it's 10th release.

Everybody in engineering grew up with one in their top pocket.

Latest release, marked Metric revision but then again the last 3 were so marked :D has dropped the log and anti log tables and replaced them with CNC commands.

Few weeks ago I managed to get a tool companies [ Cromwell Tools ] copy of the Zeus book or rather their interpretation of it, waxy type pages, not laminated but double the content of the Zeus book and cost 2.93.

It won't last as long as a Zeus in the workshop but it's a lot handier.

Got 4 copies, one for office, one to carry in workshop, one for upstairs bog and one for the downstairs thunderbox.

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Scishopguy
07-01-2009, 12:19 PM
Over here and I think in OZ we have the Zeus book.
Pocket sized book, laminated pages about 26, with thread charts, decimal trig, sheet metal bending etc, cost about 5 and is probably on it's 10th release.

Sir John....That brings to mind a little trade show giveway that I was given by my former boss at the university. It was a spiral bound, 3"x5" notebook of reference tables, logs and anti logs, trig tables, drill and tap data, and a collection of tips and tricks. It was put out in the 60's by Morse Cutting tool. It is the neatest little guide and yet I have not seen anything like it available here in the states. I must admit, I have not been to a trade show since the early 80's, though. :(

lazlo
07-01-2009, 12:31 PM
Sir John....That brings to mind a little trade show giveway that I was given by my former boss at the university. It was a spiral bound, 3"x5" notebook of reference tables, logs and anti logs, trig tables, drill and tap data, and a collection of tips and tricks.

That's the Engineer's Black Book, with the exception of the Tips and Tricks, which I don't need in a shop book anyway...

motorworks
07-01-2009, 05:31 PM
Just a tip
I have a folder in the shop with plastic sheeves that you can put standard sheets in
I print off tables,emails,items from shop forms, etc and have it on hand for quick reference
Been doing this for years...
I have shop form notes the likes of: Sir John, Forest,Weird Science,Thrud,and others.
email from many friends,shop form people,and tech advice from suppliers
Threads tables from various places on the net, the best being
http://www.gewinde-normen.de/en/index.html
Taper pin charts,strength charts,bearing fits, material properties etc
and a **** load of hand written notes on how the hell I did it :)

just a though
eddie
ps copies available at 25.00 + shipping :)

TexasKnifeMaker
07-02-2009, 12:47 AM
I asked this question a little over a year ago - what's a good set of books for a beginner - and got some great answers. Try this thread - - - http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=29183

Regards,
Jacque

Oldbrock
07-02-2009, 01:17 AM
I taught from and still prefer " Technology of Machine Tools" by Steve F Krar and Albert F Check. Krar has collaborated with others in earlier texts. Got my last copy from Alibris. ISBN 0-02-803071-0 It will probably cover most of any HSM needs. Peter

Thomas Staubo
07-02-2009, 06:37 PM
From recommendation by John S. in another recent thread here, I ordered vol. 1&2 of "Workshop Technology" by Chapham.
I bought them used from UK, the books were very cheap but with postage it came to a total of $22.70 (bought on Abebooks.com).

I got them books today, right on time for my birthday :D.

Going to read them on the bed now, will probably go to sleep quite fast I suspect :p.


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