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gambler
07-01-2009, 01:01 PM
Hi all, I noticed other posts concerning wiring a lathe to run in reverse. On my logan I have a threaded spindle nose, my chucks and face plates screw on to the spindle.

My question is what benefit could running in reverse offer, and wouldn't my chuck be more likely to unscrew if I take a heavy cut?

websterz
07-01-2009, 01:06 PM
Hi all, I noticed other posts concerning wiring a lathe to run in reverse. On my logan I have a threaded spindle nose, my chucks and face plates screw on to the spindle.

My question is what benefit could running in reverse offer, and wouldn't my chuck be more likely to unscrew if I take a heavy cut?

You are not going to do much cutting in reverse, but yes, it can unscrew and get a bit wild. Reversing the spindle is handy if you are power tapping in the lathe, other than that I wouldn't worry about it.

Astronowanabe
07-01-2009, 01:24 PM
Hi all, I noticed other posts concerning wiring a lathe to run in reverse. On my logan I have a threaded spindle nose, my chucks and face plates screw on to the spindle.

My question is what benefit could running in reverse offer, and wouldn't my chuck be more likely to unscrew if I take a heavy cut?


I decided not to wire in reverse when I switched out my motor figuring I was still pretty new to owning a lathe and the main thing was not to hurt myself, the machine or ruin parts and reverse is one more thing you can do wrong.
it has been a year and a half and I cant say I have missed it much. the only operation I might have done differently is avoid threading into a shoulder
but that hasn't been enough of a problem to wire reverse back in.

if you are not production oriented and haven't totally mastered forward yet
I would recommend just skipping it for now, you can always take an hour an or so and rewire the motor to reverse if you really need to for some reason.

Mcgyver
07-01-2009, 01:40 PM
while not a super common use, its handy on some threading jobs such as threading to an internal shoulder....you turn the tool upside down or put it at the back, put the lathe in reverse and you are now cutting the thread from headstock to tailstock....that and backing out a tap and is what i use it for

mayfieldtm
07-01-2009, 02:55 PM
I like to run in Reverse when Filing.


Tom M.

aboard_epsilon
07-01-2009, 03:26 PM
Don't forget metric threading ..you need reverse then..but you're not cutting or threading ..just reversing back to start position ..so chuck should not come off.

All the best.markj

J. Randall
07-02-2009, 12:54 AM
Gambler, you do need to exercise a little care, but in many cases you can run a live center in the tailstock and that will keep the chuck from unscrewing on a heavy cut. Wire it up, when the need arises you will like it, just use a little common sense.
James

gambler
07-02-2009, 12:59 AM
thanks for the replys guys. currently I only have forward. but I did get a new drum switch and will install it eventually. I intend to do some tapping so I will sometimein the future make reverse functional. and remember the cautions.:)

DaHui
07-02-2009, 01:13 AM
I run in reverse when chamfering the OD or when facing large diameter work.

gnm109
07-02-2009, 05:17 AM
Reverse is handy on a lathe from time to time. I use if for polishing with emery or crocus cloth, filing, backing out of tapped holes, reverse for metric threading. You definitely need to have the capability.

Pherdie
07-02-2009, 09:04 AM
Also handy for internal threading in a blind hole. Start at the bottom and work your way out. A lot easier on nerves and tools.....