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RTPBurnsville
07-04-2009, 05:38 PM
Hi,

I have been looking for a compressor for my shop and today I discovered a Quincy at the local Northern Tool. This looks like a very nice compressor and was wondering if anyone had any comments or if there is something else I should also look at.

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200350475_200350475&issearch=35239001

Thanks
Robert

wierdscience
07-04-2009, 05:54 PM
Quincy makes a good pump,but did you notice a couple of things?

The one you have selected the pump turns at 1310 rpm,as a rule of thumb the lower the pump RPM the longer the life.Also the 5hp motor they have rated at 230vac 21amps.The amperage is light for a 1800 rpm motor,so I suspect it's running 3600.
The next model up features a 932rpm pump speed and a 5hp,230vac 28amp motor running 1800 rpm.20 more gallons of tank and 17.2 CFM@175 it's also $600 more,but it's a lot more pump.

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200350476_200350476

IMHO The first one will probably work just fine for years depending on how much you use it.If you are needing to run 40hrs a week and use a lot of air,then I would go with the heavier low RPM unit.

jimmstruk
07-04-2009, 07:44 PM
Weirdscience did not mention that the more expensive model is equipped with a magnenic motor starter and delivers 2cu/ft more air. JIM

davidh
07-04-2009, 07:57 PM
and the first one will be quite noisy. . compared to the slower one.

steverice
07-04-2009, 09:22 PM
When I bought my air compressor, I went to the tool store and lined up the candidates. I looked at h.p. c.f.m. and how loud they were. In the end the Quincy won out, even though it was less h.p. it still had higher c.f.m. and was considerably quieter than the other "name" brands that were there. It has been working flawlessly for over 10 years now.

It did cost more, but in the long run it was worth the extra.

s.r.

ligito
07-04-2009, 10:53 PM
I bought the same Quincy compressor, from Northern tool and just fired it up, this afternoon.
I also installed a 30 amp DPST switch from Platt Electric ($22), so I can shut it off by my entry door.

I don't think it's any noisier than my portable 2 HP Speedaire and a whole bunch quieter than my oilless portable.

I was going to get a single stage but talked myself into spending (credit card) twice the price for a 2 stage.

It will outlast me.

I still have to finish the air lines.

radkins
07-05-2009, 12:48 AM
That Quincy you are looking at is a REALLY good outfit that will last for many years with proper care. Quincy is one of the oldest names in the business and their units are well engineered, 21 AMPs is not bad for a 5 HP rated motor and did you notice that motor is an industrial rated Baldor? Also these things are made in the USA not just "assembled" in the USA from Chinese parts like some who claim to be made in America (Quincy has a joint venture in China to produce some rotary compressor parts for the Chinese and foreign markets but nothing else). I honestly believe that Quincy builds the very best compressor in this class, and larger units too, and they still have old-time American made quality that other companies have sacrificed by using import parts or entire units.

tmc_31
07-05-2009, 12:02 PM
Hi all,

I bought a Quincy Compressor a few years ago. It was one of the "tire buster" style, 2 stage with a 8 hp Honda engine on it. The compressor was and is excellent, very high quality. The pump was manufactured in Italy.

I don't think you will go wrong with Quincy.

Tim

lazlo
07-05-2009, 12:23 PM
I honestly believe that Quincy builds the very best compressor in this class, and larger units too, and they still have old-time American made quality that other companies have sacrificed by using import parts or entire units.

That's my understanding as well: Quincy are high-end industrial grade compressors, in the same category as Champion.

mikem
07-05-2009, 12:31 PM
The horizontal Quincy that I bought a while back is much quieter than the one I had previously. I really like mine. It runs on 110V and is smaller than the one you are looking at. If you get it, let us know how it works.

radkins
07-05-2009, 02:18 PM
The horizontal Quincy that I bought a while back is much quieter than the one I had previously. I really like mine. It runs on 110V and is smaller than the one you are looking at. If you get it, let us know how it works.



The concern that because the pump is running at more than 1000 RPM that it will probably be noisy and relatively short lived is usually a genuine concern with a lot of compressors but it should not be with the Quincy, or any other well engineered compressor. I have "first-hand" experience with the compressor being discussed here (also from Northern) and I can honestly say it is no more noisy than most compressors this size and actually quieter than most.

As far as pump life only time will tell of course but Quincy's track record is extraordinary. A simple inspection of the pump and the way the complete unit is assembled shows obvious quality differences between it and most compressors of this class. My old Quincy pump was built in 1970 and supplied an auto body shop for over 24 years before being replaced by a new Quincy, this pump (without being rebuilt) was then mounted on a new 30 gallon tank and powered by a gasoline engine and mounted on my service truck where it has performed flawlessly since.

steverice
07-05-2009, 04:59 PM
It sounds like the general consensus is that the Quincy is a high quality part.

Glad it is the path I chose.

wierdscience
07-05-2009, 08:06 PM
It sounds like the general consensus is that the Quincy is a high quality part.

Glad it is the path I chose.

Certainly,just some of us were pointing out that even Quincy has several different,call it-"service factor"compressors.

That first pump is lighter duty than the second one I linked too,but it will still be several times better quality than a comparable unit from the likes of Home Depot or Sears.

steverice
07-05-2009, 11:46 PM
Certainly,just some of us were pointing out that even Quincy has several different,call it-"service factor"compressors.

That first pump is lighter duty than the second one I linked too,but it will still be several times better quality than a comparable unit from the likes of Home Depot or Sears.

And I am sure that the service factors will all be related to price point.

RTPBurnsville
07-06-2009, 08:44 AM
Thanks for all the comments. I am going to stop back at Northern later this week and take a second look at compressors with the above in-mind.

At this time its hard to justify an additional 600 or 700 as the original model was a significate jump up from where I started shopping. I just have a home shop and do a few odd jobs at times so want something nice but not over the top. I like to buy quality but there are limits to what one can afford, as mentioned everything is to a price point. Thanks again as your input has been helpful.

oldtiffie
07-06-2009, 09:33 AM
21 amps is a lot to draw from a normal 230V single phase (domestic?) supply here in OZ.

This may or may not be a problem if you are using the compressor on its own without any other power hog at the same time. This will be the case mostly.

It will certainly not be the case if you have a small-to-medium plasma cutter running as well as some have quite high air demands and fairly high power demands as well - both the compressor and the cutter will be running simultaneously. The air is essential for plasma cutting and on my machine is used for cooling as well.

I have 2 X 60A 1 phase 230v 50Hz supplies to my shop (no 3 Phase) so I can put one machine on each phase.

I don't know how a single circuit with two high load machines/loads would take two of those larger loads starting together.

My 240A MIG welder draws 35A as well.

My 2-phase 240A "chokey" "stick" welder draws lots of amps as well.

My high(er) loads/machines are spread across both phases for "balance". Each are from 50A 3-phase sockets (wired for single phase) with 50A cables. I have a 6m (20 feet) 50A extension cable as well.

I had one of the local Electrical Contractors install it all.

My shop is OK as there is only me in it. If there was more than one person running any of the higher load machines, I'd have to re-think it and perhaps have it re-wired.

We still have the 2-phase supply we had installed (from the Suppliers connection point) when getting 2-phase was relatively easy as they were looking for additional loads (and charges) - but 3-phase was not available to domestic services. Its different now as they are at capacity. We had 2-phase as we had a lot of demand as well as a (big) double-element "off-peak" electric hot water service (we have gas now).

I go off and see the Electrical Contractor for advice before even really settling on a machine. I take his advice and get him to do any circuit work. Good service, good price and never a problem.

HSS
07-06-2009, 09:50 AM
I have a Quincy at work and it is very quiet, but I have an oilless in my shop at home and the shop is far enough from the house that the noise doesn't bother anyone, yet if I forget and leave it on when I go in I can hear it running and go back out and shut it off. It is outside the shop so the noise doesn't bother me when inside the shop working. They both serve the purpose intended and, so far, haven't had any problem with either one. My wife complains the Quincy takes too long to pump up and she wants to rebuild it. I just turn it on before I need it and don't worry about how long it takes to get up to pressure. She's just used to larger air systems.

Patrick

pressurerelief
07-06-2009, 11:08 AM
I bought a Quincy with a pressure lubricated pump. I hope my daughters enjoy it because it will surely outlast me.

HSS, how did you train your wife so well? Mine is happy if the compressor blows up the kids pool toys.

P/R

Roy Andrews
07-06-2009, 01:40 PM
this is going to be kinda long but has a good point. i purchased a compressor like the one in the second post at an auction. it was very lightly used but had a 3 phase motor so it went cheap. i pulled the 3 phase and made a rotary converter for my uncle. the compressor sat for a couple years while i got on with life. then i wanted more air and decided to commission the big compressor. got a new baldor low speed compressor motor but couldn't find the old pulley. after a lot of research and getting the specs on the pump i was amazed to find out how much life you can get out of these pumps with just a little under-driving. according to the specs under-driving the pump 8% lost less than 2 cfm of air and pushed the overhaul rating up 30%. it converted to an extra 10 years of 40 hr weeks. the low speed is nice also you can stand next to this thing and have a conversation.