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View Full Version : Raising table height on a Millrite



RossW
07-05-2009, 11:13 PM
Need sugestions on how to raise a Millrite. I am tall and the table is to low to suit me. I would like to to be about 12 inches higher. I wa thinking abour pouring a 12inch thick concrete base and bolting the mill to that. Any better ides?

Thank

gnm109
07-05-2009, 11:43 PM
I wanted to raise my ENCO lathe a few years ago since I had trouble cleaning out the chip tray. It was also a little bit low. I used 2" X 4" x 3/16" wall square steel tubing to raise it 4". It wouldn't be too difficult to make a heavy-duty stand to raise your machine up 10" or 12". I just cut 45 degree joints on the units and MIG welded them together. They are about 18" long and 12 " wide. They bolt to the original holes in the base with longer bolts through 1/2" holes in the square tubing. Concrete would work also but I'd prefer to work with steel.

I was only raising the lathe 4" so I used an engine hoist and did one end at a time. I guess you'd need something larger to lift your machine.


http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/MachinesE.jpg


http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/MachinesF.jpg

Astronowanabe
07-06-2009, 04:11 AM
Need sugestions on how to raise a Millrite. I am tall and the table is to low to suit me. I would like to to be about 12 inches higher. I wa thinking abour pouring a 12inch thick concrete base and bolting the mill to that. Any better ides?

Thank

use it as an excuse to get a bigger mill.

BadDog
07-06-2009, 04:44 AM
A good friend of mine (who recently moved away) had similar problems. He was about 6'7, and his Bridgeport had him stooping! He built a sub-frame from structural steel (2" square 0.250 wall I think) such that he had space underneath (for stock storage or whatever) and could easily get a pallet jack underneath to move as needed. He also had a Van-Norman lifted with heavy caters and screw feet to stabilize and take weight off the casters. Or maybe that's backwards? Anyway, you can easily raise it any height you like by just welding up a frame. My 17x60 lathe was too low, so I turned some (roughly) 6x5 round slugs and set the adjustment feet on those.

Ed ke6bnl
07-08-2009, 03:49 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v313/ke6bnl/Metal%20Working/drivers005.jpg

mine is on a steel plate only about 5" talller but I quess you could go higher. Ed bolted to plate and can put pallet jack under it to move.

Jim Shaper
07-08-2009, 07:34 AM
When I get around to it, I'll be parking my turret mill on some 4x4 skids.

You can make them out of steel, but the simple truth is that the machines aren't all that heavy - even at 2300#. A 2x4 in vertical orientation has a load capacity of something like 5000lbs compression strength. With the price of steel - it's a no brainer to use wood for a non-critical dimension spacer. It has the added benefit of absorbing some of the vibration as well.

I'll be using old dry wood. Using fresh stuff from the store might leave you prone to some warping as it fully dries. With how green the stuff they claim is heat treated is these days - I'm not taking any chances.

kvom
07-09-2009, 12:00 PM
I have my lathe sitting on a pair of 4x4s, which not only raised the height to where I wanted it but also allows me to get a pallet jack underneath if I need to move it.

The same should work with a mill.