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denger
07-10-2009, 11:43 AM
First of all, I am not a machinist in any way. I am a woodworker, so please bear with me since I know nothing about machining metal.
I have several beautiful old hand planes. Unfortunately the soles of the planes have been bitten by rust pitting. I would like to somehow grind a layer of metal away to get to a good surface.
I have done this on one plane by just using my sharpening water stones and a ton of elbow grease, but I am out of elbow grease since it took me 2 hours and 45 minutes to do one surface by hand. Had to take a bunch of pain killers after that.
So, here comes the question: is there a way to gently grind (sand?) a surface without distorting it out of being flat too badly?
I certainly do not need high precision. I can correct somewhat out of flat sole by hand on a stone. But what would be the easiest way to take off the bulk? I am talking about taking off approximately 0.01-0.03 inches off a cast iron surface approx. 2"x16".
I cannot afford and I do not want to buy a mill or a surface grinder. I only have woodworking tools, but among them I do have a disk sander. Will that work? Any other ideas?

oldtiffie
07-10-2009, 11:48 AM
The simplest solution might be to get an opinion and a price/quote from a shop that re-conditions/grinds automotive engine heads etc.

Falcon67
07-10-2009, 12:01 PM
You could use a good, flat piece of steel or iron and wrap it with 320 grit wet/dry then use WD-40 to lube it and sand the bottom of the planes with that. Or get a small surface plate and put a bit sheet of 320 and the WD-40. Go up to 400, then 600 and see if that's smooth enough.

Bruce Griffing
07-10-2009, 12:04 PM
Get a thick glass plate. Support it well on a flat surface. Check it for flatness using a straightedge. Use spray glue to attach ~100 grit zirconia sanding belt. Weight your plane with about 30 pounds of whatever you can find and start sanding it flat. After a few minutes the abrasive will dull - sharpen it by going over it with the end of an old file. Once you have it removed the pits, ~15 minutes if the plane is worth saving, go to finer grits until you are happy with the finish. On the finer grits, lubrication with oil helps remove swarf.

oldtiffie
07-10-2009, 12:17 PM
.................................................. ....
I have several beautiful old hand planes. Unfortunately the soles of the planes have been bitten by rust pitting. I would like to somehow grind a layer of metal away to get to a good surface.
I have done this on one plane by just using my sharpening water stones and a ton of elbow grease, but I am out of elbow grease since it took me 2 hours and 45 minutes to do one surface by hand. Had to take a bunch of pain killers after that.
..............................................
..............................................

But what would be the easiest way to take off the bulk? I am talking about taking off approximately 0.01-0.03 inches off a cast iron surface approx. 2"x16".
I cannot afford and I do not want to buy a mill or a surface grinder. I only have woodworking tools, but among them I do have a disk sander. Will that work? Any other ideas?

As there are "several planes" (not just one or two), I'd have thought that the "being out of elbow grease" and the need for pain-killers would or should have eliminated anything repetitive or strenuous.

"Tennis elbow" and the like can be a real PITA and is not cured by a couple of pain-killers. I've seen a bad case with a Carpenter who was using a common manual screw-driver to drive a lot of "difficult" and "big" wood-screws. He had his arm in a sling for weeks and lots of trips to his Doctor. He was very wary of it ever since. He was NOT a "newbie" - far from it.

aboard_epsilon
07-10-2009, 12:35 PM
You don't say what country you are from ..


if you live in the UK ..you will be able to pick up a surface grinder for hopefully under £200 (less than the cost of a decent electric drill)

like so

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/JONES-SHIPMAN-540-SURFACE-GRINDER_W0QQitemZ150357085019QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK _BOI_Metalworking_Milling_Welding_Metalworking_Sup plies_ET?hash=item2301fb0b5b&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=65%3A12%7C66%3A2%7C39%3A1%7C72%3A1688%7C 293%3A1%7C294%3A50

one of the above will help you sharpen a lot of your woodworking tools including planer knives of up to 18 inches long



if in the USA ..its hard luck you pay through the nose for one of these second hand.

all the best.markj

daryl bane
07-10-2009, 01:22 PM
I know nothing about the requirements of woodworking tools, but could these planes be hand scraped? Would a hand scraped surface on these tools be a plus or minus, just a thought?

Carld
07-10-2009, 01:31 PM
Almost any job shop machine shop could flycut the surface for you. It would be faster than setting up a surface grinder and just as accurate for what you want. Have you priced having it done at a machine shop?

The only problem would be holding them so they may have to make a fixture but it would be required for surface grinding too.

budedm
07-10-2009, 01:42 PM
Do you have a bench type belt sander? That would do it. I wouldn't use a disk sander as you may put gouges in it.

dockrat
07-10-2009, 01:48 PM
In the days before I had a combo disk/belt sander I used to mount my B&D hand held belt sander in the big vise bottom side up to do stuff like that. As a woodworker, you must have one of those.

thistle
07-10-2009, 01:57 PM
I am working on a couple of stanley # 6 planes ,notbeen used ,
looked terrible and work terribly as the finish(ex factory ) is a very course belt sand .
the soles also are quite warped.

if they needed a lot of metal removed i would have stuck them on the vertical mill and cleaned up the bottomm and sides with whatever small end mill was in the mill. i would not use a large diameter cutter .

I just started on theplane with a biax scraper, and went over it until i had got the bottom of the grinding marks , i then spotted the bottom with blue and worked off the high spots , repeat ect until i was happy.

how far to go? blue the bottom of one of your best working planes and go about that far.

a wood plane doesnt need to be perfectly flat,just good enough.


now you probably dont have a biax, you can make a carbide scraper, and buy a cheap granite plate and accomplish the same thing fairly cheaply

Mcgyver
07-10-2009, 03:11 PM
first off, I completely agree scraping is the way to go, they are such a treat to use after being scraped...less stiction if thatís word. Its what Iíd to do a new or old plane, and consider it a significant upgrade. i would never go at with a belt sander though, no control.


Ihow far to go? blue the bottom of one of your best working planes and go about that far.

a wood plane doesnt need to be perfectly flat,just good enough.



perfect doesn't exist...but i would go for better than existing planes. they are notoriously for being out - everyone's rushing product out the door and a casting that shape is expensive season when they think woodworkers will never notice. now splitting tenths doesn't matter, we donít need it perfect but should shoot for pretty damn good. Frankly, when scrapping, whether you get it to tenths or thou's is just a function of how flat the reference is not how much work it takes

why does it matter? most i think underestimate how sensitive a touch us humans have; most can distinguish a thou when given two gauge blocks a thou apart. Its an incredible thing that experience can let us grab a plane and create just by feel and observation a very flat and square board. As skills progress you need the square and ruler less to achieve this. My theory is in developing this tactic ability with a plane, having the sole out 3 or 5 or 10 thou will make a big difference, like trying to learn to race cars but the steering is out of alignment and the suspension mushy; you just donít' get the feedback and feel you need to progress.

point is i guess a super experienced hand tool craftsman would probably scoff at the notion of the plane being within a thou, but for the rest of us trying to develop the tactile feel, removing error for that source can help....and the reduced stiction is in of itself a good reason to scrape them....and afterall weíre metal workers so of course think in terms of much more accuracy than woodworkers are accustom to :D

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/scraping/planescrapedin.jpg

thistle
07-10-2009, 03:19 PM
2 planes scraped and ready for duty.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/mudskipper/july10017.jpg

thistle
07-10-2009, 03:23 PM
thank goodness you posted that, i thought i was the only one silly enough to be scraping planes as the sweat dripped off my nose earlier...

lost in la
07-10-2009, 03:45 PM
Scraping is a good way to go if you have lots of time and the proper tools. The easiest way is to take it to a machine shop and have them mill it flat.

Sanding flat with a belt sander will leave a roll off near the edges.

A small machine shop would probably do them for $20-30 a piece.
Lost

Al Flipo
07-10-2009, 03:50 PM
Whatever you do...Do not try to clean them up in the mill, they will warp in all directions...been there, done that.

thistle
07-10-2009, 03:54 PM
so for about 50 bucks you could be in the scraping business.

carbide blank


http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INSRAR2&PMAKA=619-1237&PMPXNO=16718986


piece of granite

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=640-0120&PMPXNO=949402&PARTPG=INLMK3

blue

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-1387&PMPXNO=942802&PARTPG=INLMK3


find a piece of scrap steel for a shank , turn a handle, have the blank silver soldered by someone.....

Mcgyver
07-10-2009, 03:57 PM
thank goodness you posted that, i thought i was the only one silly enough to be scraping planes as the sweat dripped off my nose earlier...

I create a competitive environment for the manifestation of workshop silliness.......you haven't see the hinged and crank rig i made for the lathe to wear in baseball gloves :D and i hadn't even been drinking

thistle
07-10-2009, 03:57 PM
my biggest diaster was doing the sole of a plane on a shaper, the tool caught

in the hole for the blade and bang , scratch one plane casting , lucky it was a free dump find , but still...

so milling it is for me.

dixdance
07-10-2009, 04:57 PM
Scraping is definitely the way to go. I've seen people take planes to machine shops for grinding and get them back still not flat. Hard to fixture them so they don't deflect, especially the longer ones. And once you get good at it, it take less time than to drop the plane off at someone else's shop and pick it up later.

You don't even need a carbide scraper, easy to grind the end of an old file. And far easier to modify it or vary the angles.

For the original poster, that piece of flat granite can be very useful for all sorts of things, well worth the money.

NSB
07-10-2009, 05:22 PM
With the caveat that I haven't tried this myself, but would not some judicious use of a good quality file remove the pitted metal quickly and with a relatively low financial investment?

I'd probably start with conventional filing until under the pits, then move to draw filing (http://www.tpub.com/content/armyordnance/Od16218/Od162180135.htm).

I am assuming that planes are not file hard, or scraping would not be an option.

Frank Ford
07-10-2009, 05:38 PM
In reading through this thread I didn't notice any mention of one little item.

There's a temptation to take the plane apart before working on it. I think it's a good idea to retract the blade and tighten the cap down normally before flattening the sole, to avoid having the plane body distort slightly when it's clamped up for use, negating some of the effort in truing it up.

Michael Edwards
07-10-2009, 05:54 PM
thank goodness you posted that, i thought i was the only one silly enough to be scraping planes as the sweat dripped off my nose earlier...


Looks like you are in good company, here is a link that shows some incredible planes made by Stephen Thomas. Post # 28

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/showthread.php?t=184209&highlight=hand+plane

ME

Forrest Addy
07-10-2009, 06:56 PM
I have some experience with hand planes. Trust me, you do not want them perfectly flat. If you make them flat there's no way you can disengage the plane from the chip it's generating without aactually lifting it. Flattening planes (smooths and jacks) need to have a little rocker in the half of the sole under the tote. Then you can relaxe your downward force on the knob and push down a little harder on the tote. This action is almost automatic - an action communicated by the plane to the user rather than a user skill learned from a mentor or from experience.

Thus, how the plane sole is flattened will depend to some extent on the uses the user intends. The flattest sole will work best on a long jointer plane and the most convex on a small smooth. The sole should never bne made concave. Some advocate a little concavity but it dooms the user of such a plane for smoothing convexities like barrels and boat hulls.

Anyway to the center of the narrative: Before you get into hand scraping find a good second cut square file and fit it with a good handle. A square files (and round and trianges) are not perfect tapers. They have a belly in the toothed face. Use this belly to concentrate filing action on the high places in the work. File the plane's sole down until the pits vanish (I don't know why a few pits are anathema to a plane user but they do hate them. I'm not at all bothered by them.) Monitor progress by usung a straight edge longitudanally, cross wise, and diagonaly. A good scale from a combination set is very suitable as a reference straightedge for this class of work.

Once the sole is filed flat, check with the graninte flat and Prussian blue. Scrape accordingly striving for very little undulation. Stone after scraping before taking the prints. Cast iron planes are very flexible. Do not bring the plate to the work if it's clamped in a vise. Remove it from the vise and take it to the plate.

Don't forget cleanliness. Use a shop vac to clean up the area before you take a print from the surface plate.

Make sure the area around the mouth of the plane is finely scraped with clear sharply defined indications right up to the opening. "Rolled off" corners are the source of a number of performance problems in a hand plane.

If I was to suggest a model contour for a plane sole it would be this: The heel side of the mouth would be scraped to the reference plane back to about 1/2 the way to the heel. The toe flat would be scraped to 0.001 to 0.002 above the reference flat so it acts somewhat like the infeed table of a wood jointer. The heel portion would be scraped to a ramp ranging from 0.003 total on a #3 smooth to 0.001 in a long jointer like a #7 or 8. Bear in mind these are personal preferences. Flat to a few thou convex works very well for most work.

Absolute flatness in a plane sole is a rube's requirement.

tattoomike68
07-10-2009, 07:45 PM
The simplest solution might be to get an opinion and a price/quote from a shop that re-conditions/grinds automotive engine heads etc.


Yep they will it it close to a butthair, a good first step for sure.

denger
07-10-2009, 07:48 PM
First of all, thanks for everyone who replied. Now I have some questions about scraping.
I already have a granite plate. So, if I buy this carbide blank, and attach it to steel rod and fit it with a handle, I get some kind of a tool. Now how do I use that?
Remember, I never touched a metal tool.


so for about 50 bucks you could be in the scraping business.

carbide blank


http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INSRAR2&PMAKA=619-1237&PMPXNO=16718986


piece of granite

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=640-0120&PMPXNO=949402&PARTPG=INLMK3

blue

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-1387&PMPXNO=942802&PARTPG=INLMK3


find a piece of scrap steel for a shank , turn a handle, have the blank silver soldered by someone.....

tattoomike68
07-10-2009, 07:52 PM
first buy a good file or two, a big nice one. it will make scaping far less work.

A little advice dont spend $1,000 on a $20 problem. ;)

oldtiffie
07-10-2009, 08:00 PM
This is a previous partial post by the OP and my response.



Originally Posted by denger

.................................................. ....
I have several beautiful old hand planes. Unfortunately the soles of the planes have been bitten by rust pitting. I would like to somehow grind a layer of metal away to get to a good surface.
I have done this on one plane by just using my sharpening water stones and a ton of elbow grease, but I am out of elbow grease since it took me 2 hours and 45 minutes to do one surface by hand. Had to take a bunch of pain killers after that.
..............................................
..............................................

But what would be the easiest way to take off the bulk? I am talking about taking off approximately 0.01-0.03 inches off a cast iron surface approx. 2"x16".
I cannot afford and I do not want to buy a mill or a surface grinder. I only have woodworking tools, but among them I do have a disk sander. Will that work? Any other ideas?


As there are "several planes" (not just one or two), I'd have thought that the "being out of elbow grease" and the need for pain-killers would or should have eliminated anything repetitive or strenuous.

"Tennis elbow" and the like can be a real PITA and is not cured by a couple of pain-killers. I've seen a bad case with a Carpenter who was using a common manual screw-driver to drive a lot of "difficult" and "big" wood-screws. He had his arm in a sling for weeks and lots of trips to his Doctor. He was very wary of it ever since. He was NOT a "newbie" - far from it.

I see and hear all the good advice regarding filing and scraping etc. and what YOU would do.

The topic by the OP makes it clear that its about what HE can and cannot do to get an acceptably cleaned and flat base on his multiple planes.

As the way he has been doing it has caused him as much grief as it has, it seems that filing and scraping may not only not help him at all but may well make a bad problem a lot worse to the extent that his wood-working skills and activities may be even more restricted than they are now.

While he is a wood-worker with little HSM-ing/machining experience, I'd also doubt that he is a practiced scraping hand and that he has or wants to buy the stuff that's needed for scraping. He has cost limits.

So let's see if we can get back to addressing the OP's problems so that he can get his required outcome within his limitations.

thistle
07-10-2009, 08:43 PM
you dont need to be an expert to scrape a plane bed.
just get stuck in and do it.

it will make you sweat, but you will get there much quicker than using abrasives,( and it just looks better)

i have been there done it.

if you do a search you will find all manner of advise on here and PM on scraping, also a google search will yeild a bunch of links.

heres a good link on making a carbide scraper blade

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/showthread.php?t=92030&highlight=carbide+scraper


and here

http://www.dapra.com/biax/scrapers/reference.htm

solder the carbide on to the steel , then put a radius on it. you can do this with a diamond file( will take a while, but it can be done) you can also sharpen it with a diamond file, whetstone , like the ones DMT make.

the proper way to do it is with a diamond grinding wheel on the bench grinder,to form the radius ($$$$$$)and finish lap with a soft metal(iron) lap embeded with diamond paste


cheers

oldtiffie
07-10-2009, 10:31 PM
Maybe I am being unduly sceptical or questioning of the OP here, but I've just re-read the original post:


First of all, I am not a machinist in any way. I am a woodworker, so please bear with me since I know nothing about machining metal.
I have several beautiful old hand planes. Unfortunately the soles of the planes have been bitten by rust pitting. I would like to somehow grind a layer of metal away to get to a good surface.
I have done this on one plane by just using my sharpening water stones and a ton of elbow grease, but I am out of elbow grease since it took me 2 hours and 45 minutes to do one surface by hand. Had to take a bunch of pain killers after that.
So, here comes the question: is there a way to gently grind (sand?) a surface without distorting it out of being flat too badly?
I certainly do not need high precision. I can correct somewhat out of flat sole by hand on a stone. But what would be the easiest way to take off the bulk? I am talking about taking off approximately 0.01-0.03 inches off a cast iron surface approx. 2"x16". I cannot afford and I do not want to buy a mill or a surface grinder. I only have woodworking tools, but among them I do have a disk sander. Will that work? Any other ideas?

The parts that I have emboldened are a cause for concern.

Planes that are 2" x 16" are not the norm - but would be available.

If the sole was corroded by 0.010">0.030", that is a lot of rust in cast iron and I can't see it being restricted to just the sole either - think: sides, blades, and all ancillary/adjusting parts. If that were the case, I'd doubt that the plane/s would be worth the effort. It is one hell of a job to grind and then scrape as the grinding won't help the scraping much at all.

I just hope that this is not a scam or a "wind-up" or a Troll.

My "Troll Alarm" is blinking a rapid amber and about to move to red.

I am all too well aware of the adverse comments that were heaped on member "Teenage Machinist" (aka TM and TMT) as he got an undeserved "rubbishing" in his earlier times and posts here.

I do hope that I am proved to have unnecessary concerns or doubts.

The OP should now be well aware of what scraping is and what is involved and yet I've seen no response from him in that regard other than to say that he is considering buying the tools for it. I don't know how that will fit with his aching arm/s?

Here's a few relevant links:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plane_(tool)

http://www.handplane.com/
http://www.record-planes.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Works

denger
07-10-2009, 11:02 PM
The parts that I have emboldened are a cause for concern.

Planes that are 2" x 16" are not the norm - but would be available.


Didn't I say approximately? Yes, yes, a jointer plane would be closer to 2 1/2 wide.




If the sole was corroded by 0.010">0.030", that is a lot of rust in cast iron and I can't see it being restricted to just the sole either - think: sides, blades, and all ancillary/adjusting parts.


Didn't I say approximately? I was giving a range where 1/64 is, which is the best precision woodworkers operate in.

Yes, they are pretty rusty. No, I do not intend to keep the old blade, I have wonderful Japanse laminated blades for them and new cap irons.
I do not care about pits on the sides - they do not affect performance. "ancillary/adjusting parts" you are referring to, like frog with the lateral lever and the depth screw adjust cleaned up nicely and work fine.



I just hope that this is not a scam or a "wind-up" or a Troll.

My "Troll Alarm" is blinking a rapid amber and about to move to red.


Thank you for the vote of confidence and a warm welcome.



The OP should now be well aware of what scraping is and what is involved and yet I've seen no response from him in that regard other than to say that he is considering buying the tools for it. I don't know how that will fit with his aching arm/s?

"Well aware" and "know how to do it" are two entirely different things. Here is an example of my work.
You should be "aware" of what it is. Now, can you actually make one?

http://photo.gerasimov.net/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=21107&g2_serialNumber=2


BTW, I fail to see how your basic plane links are relevant to anything discussed here.

lazlo
07-10-2009, 11:10 PM
Here is an example of my work.

Wow, that's beautiful! Love the Ying Yang :) I don't know the first thing about woodworking -- what kind of wood is that?


I have several beautiful old hand planes. Unfortunately the soles of the planes have been bitten by rust pitting. I would like to somehow grind a layer of metal away to get to a good surface.

As Michael mentioned in a previous post, you might want to drop Stephen Thomas a PM or email -- he's makes hand-made planes, and he's also a master (machinery) scraper. I seem to remember that he mentioned using a tool and cutter grinder to sharpen hand plane blades...

oldtiffie
07-10-2009, 11:21 PM
Deleted - duplicated in following post.

oldtiffie
07-10-2009, 11:25 PM
Thanks denger.

That clears it up nicely.

Nice work - very nice indeed.

So my "meter" is now back to a brilliant "Green".

The links were there for others to refer to - if they chose to.

Could I make them? Definitely no.

Would I try to? No - not in the foreseeable future anyway.

Would I like to be able to? Definitely yes.

denger
07-10-2009, 11:28 PM
what kind of wood is that?

The salt shaker body is primarily maple. The pepper grinder is walnut. The rings are made of merbau edged by white ash veneer.




As Michael mentioned in a previous post, you might want to drop Stephen Thomas a PM or email -- he's makes hand-made planes, and he's also a master (machinery) scraper. I seem to remember that he mentioned using a tool and cutter grinder to sharpen hand plane blades...

Thanks, I will do that. I understand the general idea about scraping, I do scrape wood and am very familiar with a cabinet scraper and scraper planes.

There was a mention of an old file ground to the correct shape. Can I use that to try things out instead of getting the carbide, solder, steel piece and other things?

Forrest Addy
07-11-2009, 01:18 AM
Here's a scraping link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkYyWcflMy8&feature=PlayList&p=4CAFB94720BD888D&index=2

I teach much the same technique in my scraping classes and is applicable to small work like plane soles.

If you all want to see how they do it in a production shop look here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3Bc1-VZ__s&feature=PlayList&p=4CAFB94720BD888D&index=4

Frankly this guy's technique with his reference tooling sucks. Look at the way he's forcing the reference into the work. However there's nothing wrong with his scraping effort. That scraper extends to his body where it ends with a pad. He thrusts with his hips or belly to push the scraper 4 to 6 times as hard as by hand alone and really move the metal. It also saves wear and tear on the shoulder girdle but the low body angle is a back killer.

oldtiffie
07-11-2009, 03:42 AM
Scraping-in is one thing and is hard enough on its own, but getting the necessary material off and the face ready for scraping is quite another - assuming 1/64" ~ 0.016" as stated by the OP.

That's a lot of filing!!!

I would think that grinding won't help the scraping - and neither will any grease or oil.

Forrest Addy
07-11-2009, 03:56 AM
[QUOTE=oldtiffie]...That's a lot of filing!!!QUOTE]

Two hours tops for a #5 Stanley jack and a 14" second cut square file - well maybe when I was in my prime. And I doubt if 0.015" needs to be taken off. A few isolated pits won't affect function or the quality of the planed surface.

oldtiffie
07-11-2009, 04:56 AM
I believe you Forrest, but have a look at what happened to the OP after his attempt at a similar task - and which he wants to avoid repeating.

Add a decent amount of time for scraping and the effort and method required and there's the basis for a lot of sore arms.

The OP (my emphasis in RED):

First of all, I am not a machinist in any way. I am a woodworker, so please bear with me since I know nothing about machining metal.
I have several beautiful old hand planes. Unfortunately the soles of the planes have been bitten by rust pitting. I would like to somehow grind a layer of metal away to get to a good surface.
I have done this on one plane by just using my sharpening water stones and a ton of elbow grease, but I am out of elbow grease since it took me 2 hours and 45 minutes to do one surface by hand. Had to take a bunch of pain killers after that.So, here comes the question: is there a way to gently grind (sand?) a surface without distorting it out of being flat too badly?
I certainly do not need high precision. I can correct somewhat out of flat sole by hand on a stone. But what would be the easiest way to take off the bulk? I am talking about taking off approximately 0.01-0.03 inches off a cast iron surface approx. 2"x16".
I cannot afford and I do not want to buy a mill or a surface grinder. I only have woodworking tools, but among them I do have a disk sander. Will that work? Any other ideas?

Ozcad
07-11-2009, 07:27 AM
I do have a disk sander. Will that work? Any other ideas?
Only if it is large enough to take the whole length of the plane? we have a horizontal sanding disk named the wheel of death :eek: as it has a habit of throwing work pieces off . If you have a motor reconditioner's locally I would give them a call, maybe they could surface grind them?

denger
07-11-2009, 12:18 PM
Stupid question, would this kind of scraper work if I attach it to a proper handle:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=370218572472&fromMakeTrack=true&ssPageName=VIP:Watchlink:middle:us

I do suspect this is going to be too much work, but I would like to at least try once.

BTW, great thanks to the video links!

Forrest Addy
07-11-2009, 02:21 PM
Debger, only if its sharpened correctly. When you go to scrape anything you need to be able to sharpen your scraper. That can get into some fancy expensive stuff but a simple HF diamond plated knife hone will work surprizingly well.

Something like this

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=92867

but his would be better

http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/DMT-C24.aspx?gclid=CMT6tJOhzpsCFSMSagodyj8sKA

Then there is this stuff applied to most any metal

http://business.shop.ebay.com/items/?_nkw=Diamond+lapping&_sacat=12576&_trksid=p3286.m270.l1313&_odkw=&_osacat=12576

And uf you really want to get into it make a diamond lap (second photo down - cheap) or round up a face wheel grinder and mount a diamod face wheel on it (rhird photo down- expensive)

http://business.shop.ebay.com/items/?_nkw=Diamond+lapping&_sacat=12576&_trksid=p3286.m270.l1313&_odkw=&_osacat=12576

Anyway you want a 93 to 95 degree edge angle on eack sid and an end radius of about 3" Look at the scrapers shown in the Steven Thomas link #13 of the link in post 29).

All this assumes you're challenged by the DIY aspects of cleaning up your plane soles and making them flat. New hand planes are still available and not that expensive. A good used worker plane can be had for $20 tp $50 and there are Lie Nielson for hundreds (utterly top of the line) and the Anants for much less. Don't sneer at the humble Anant (made in India). They've come a long way the last few years.

tony ennis
07-11-2009, 02:28 PM
Just remove the rust and call it a fine day. No need for them to be 'machinist' flat. The wood you're planing changes to a remarkable degree. I have never seen an old plane that wasn't sufficiently flat once de-rusted.

I have an assortment of antique Stanley planes. They clean up quick with some steel wool and WD40.

If your's are extremely rusted I'd shelf them and just buy replacements. Replacements would likely cost less than getting them machined. If you go this route, drop me and email and I can hook you up with The Guy.

An an example, you can get a very nice #5 for $30 or $40 at a flea market. You'll pay more from The Guy, but what you get will be very nice indeed.


Planes that are 2" x 16" are not the norm - but would be available.

I think a #5, the most common and useful plane, is about 14" long and not a lot less than 2" wide. My #8 is 22" long and about 2.5" wide. It's really heavy but I love it.