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davidh
07-10-2009, 02:03 PM
who is the wizzard on these shavers? i tried the search but alas, ,

Carld
07-10-2009, 02:33 PM
It could be Gandoff but I am not certain about that. There are a lot of Wizards out there, some known and some not known.:D

Liger Zero
07-10-2009, 02:49 PM
It could be Gandoff but I am not certain about that. There are a lot of Wizards out there, some known and some not known.:D

My guess was Dumbledore.

chriskat
07-10-2009, 03:57 PM
Do you mean a straight razor? If so you might want to try these people:

http://www.classicshaving.com/Straight_Razor_Sharpening_Service.html

I had them sharpen mine but I'll admit that I still can't shave with it as comfortably as with a "normal" twin blade razor.

Jeff

Carld
07-10-2009, 04:15 PM
All kidding aside, if you want to sharpen a straight razor buy a fine silicon stone and a bar of shaving soap and shaving brush and a razor strop. Put the soap in a coffee cup and with a wet shaving brush work up a lather and apply the lather to the stone. You lay the blade flat on the stone with the edge and the back touching the stone. Apply more pressure to the edge than the back and slowly stroke the full length of the razor across the full length of the stone in a sweeping motion. Keep the stone lathered up real good. After several strokes on each side then anchor one end of the strop and work the blade over the canvas side of the strop several times. Then flip the strop over and lather up the leather side of the strop and strop the blade on the leather side several times. Don't push hard on the stone or the strop when working the blade. You don't want to round the edge when stoning it or stropping it. Easy does it.

Try the edge on the hair of your arm and if it cuts clean and freely your done. If it drags and don't cut easy then go through the process again.

Practice makes perfect or as near perfect as it will ever get.

You could use a diamond lapping "stone" in place of the silicone stone, but I don't recommend it, and you don't need soap on the diamond lap but you still need soap on the strop. Shaving cream won't work, it has to be the old fashion shaving soap. You will also need a mouse to dress the stone after each use. Wash the soap off the stone and mouse after use. The stone has to be flat as a new stone all the time so don't use the stone for anything else. A mouse is a lump of pumice that has a flat side on it ready for use. Barber supply houses will have the stuff you need.

oldtiffie
07-10-2009, 09:27 PM
My father had a genuine "Bengal" blade razor. It was his pride and joy. He had the whole kit. He used to get it "set" by a local Barber, many of whom were very skilled at it.

I would think that as some Barbers still use a blade for trimming etc. that they would either have the skills to "set" them themselves or could advise who does theirs for them.

This might help:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straight_razor

Dad, bought a "Rolls" razor:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolls_Razor

as he reckoned that the blade/"Bengal" was not for him due to:
- my "having a go" and using it to sharpen a pencil with the razor and leaving a big "smile" in it and compounding it by slashing the strop when I attempted to strop the "smile" out. He was "not happy".

- his "nerve" and "steady hand" being shot to pieces because of us kids (he said).

He went to a "Gillette" razor first with single-edged rib-backed and then double-edged thin disposable blades (which did NOT sharpen successfully by "bowing" them and running them around the inside of a drinking glass).

My Barber (Hair-dresser) - "Tonsorial Artiste'???" - still uses a blade at times and has quite a few business cards displayed for blade-razor setting services.

Dawai
07-11-2009, 09:32 AM
Tattooing, well psychology of it? you take a straight razor and clear the top of the skin with it. hair and bacteria you don't want down in the tattoo to heal properly..

Once you shave the client with the "scary" straight razor they trust you and relax. Allowing you to tattoo them and do a better job.

I eventually ended up using throw-a-ways since the health laws came into effect. A razor is a health risk shared person to person. Not as bad as a needle, but.. auuwww the education I got over the years.. Portals of entry..

They make a "hair shaper" that is a razor with a throw-away blade.. you just slide the hair shaper comb off it. Look to barber supplies.

lazlo
07-11-2009, 10:46 AM
I had them sharpen mine but I'll admit that I still can't shave with it as comfortably as with a "normal" twin blade razor.

Bummer. I've been wanting to try a cut-throat razor -- the aficionados claim it's a closer, cleaner shave than a safety razor, and it seems very Zen compared to the toothbrushing experience of a Gillette.


They make a "hair shaper" that is a razor with a throw-away blade.. you just slide the hair shaper comb off it. Look to barber supplies.

They make a high-end straight razor like that too -- the "Feather." A couple of the young guys at work have them, and they describe it as "Darth Vader's razor" -- it's so unbelievable sharp that the slightest twitch leaves a deep cut.

It's hard to see in this picture but there's a very fine, custom-ground insert:

http://www.classicshaving.com/i/Feather/Artists_Club_DX_Special.jpg

boslab
07-11-2009, 08:07 PM
try also Thiers-Issard singing razor for amusement, dont drop it, it'l shatter!, yes it sings apart from the ow noise it makes taking the pimples off!
[ i wont try one now i take blood thinners, too messy]
mark
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thiers_Issard

2ManyHobbies
07-11-2009, 11:48 PM
I gave up on disposable blades in October last year. I won't go back. Got a kit off of http://www.vintagebladesllc.com/ and a a 4k/8k waterstone to hone with. I hone somewhere in the range of quarterly, but you know when you get to the point of needing it. I can shave for a work-day in about 5 minutes, if I have a special occasion, I can shave so you can see a reflection in about 20 minutes. My face wants a day off after that, but it still looks clean the next day anyway.

My reasons for switching involved continual problems with ingrown hair and an inability to attain a good clean shave with any consistency. I've gone from having 2-3 ingrown hairs at any given time to maybe 2-3 a year. With disposable blades (1, 2, 3, or 4 at a time), a good close shave usually involved a ground-beef look to my neck for a few hours. I just never had good results with electric shaving. It never felt close enough for me.

Shave as hot as you can stand it, rinse as cold as you can handle. Use aftershave and/or shave lotion. Styptic pens are great if you have a tiny nick that won't stop. Don't worry about slicing yourself and needing stitches -- if you shave with a heavy sawing motion, you might ought to stick with a beard instead. Sure you can nick yourself good, but there is all manner of overblown hype out there about how dangerous a straight razor can be. I've done more damage with a socket wrench than I did learning to shave with a straight razor.