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Alistair Hosie
07-15-2009, 02:42 PM
I scratched my new car only a little on the plastic bumper, anyway this might seem like a dumb question but I really need to know .I know that matching white is an awful job to do as there are a thousand shades of white and technically black and white are not colour's ,so I was wondering is black a one off ? in other words is black just black and will any gloss black do or are there different blacks out there .I never thought about this before.But a builder made an Erse of my bedroom on suite I had installed recently, and I had to have some white tiles replaced matching them white gloss's was almost impossible so what about the black any help would be great thanks guys. Alistair

Frank Ford
07-15-2009, 03:05 PM
Well, for me at least, black is considerably harder to match than white. I always get some kind of problem - iridescence, too green, too brown, too blue. Color matching is not my strongest suit, and my best "excuse" is that I miss a few numbers in the color vision test book.

We bought a new Toyota Sienna recently, and in the first 1000 miles, Joy managed to put a foot long scratch and crease in the rear fender. She felt lousy about it, for sure. Me, I was happy and told her I really didn't want to fix it. Now the damn car doesn't own us anymore, and we can actually USE it. . .

lynnl
07-15-2009, 03:08 PM
Well even tho black is black, I imagine there will be slight variations in the appearance of different colorings from different mfgrs.

And even if the color is exactly the same, differences in texture, gloss, amount of pigmentation, etc. could yield a slight visual difference. May or may not be noticeable.

I don't know if there are actual different colors of black, but I'd guess those other variations are likely to be just as significant.

Falcon67
07-15-2009, 03:38 PM
Tray a little shoe polish. Then maybe overwipe the whole bumper with a towel sprayed with STP Son-Of-A-Gun Tire Cleaner. I like the STP cleaner because it makes things black again without the overdone ricer-tire super shine look.

Rustybolt
07-15-2009, 07:44 PM
Is black, black. As far as auto colors go, no. Hard to believe but Audi black is a different shade than BMW black. Rustoleum black is a different shade than Dodge black. i discovered that one on my own.

John Stevenson
07-15-2009, 07:48 PM
Alistair,
You need dark black.

.

speedy
07-15-2009, 08:03 PM
If you're going to touch it up see your vehicle agent for the appropriate kit.
Me? I would live with it. It will be the first of more.
Cars are just another means of transport: leastways that's all they are to me.
Ours was new in December 1993; a Toyota Corona with stone chips, bangs and scratches. Still going strong at 200,000km:D

gregl
07-15-2009, 08:33 PM
I vote for the "live with it" answer. I once had a Model A Ford that was just a floppy runner. After I restored it, the fun sort of went out of it. I worried too much about it getting bunged up. The best car I had was a '67 bug. It was bashed and thrashed but I put over 250,000 miles on it. I could park it in the tightest places and not worry about the idiot parked next to me whacking it on his way out. In fact, on a few occasions I deliberately parked tight against some dolt who didn't get between the lines in the parking lot just to give him some grief in getting in and backing out. I knew he wouldn't want to scratch his car and I didn't care if he got mine.

doctor demo
07-15-2009, 09:58 PM
Alistair,
You need dark black.

.
Not if it is the front bumper, they are a lighter shade than the rear bumper.
Alistar also said it was a plastic bumper , so He will need plastic paint.

Steve:D

lynnl
07-15-2009, 10:32 PM
Another vote for "live with it."

That's a good reason for never buying a brand new vehicle. Especially a truck. A truck is supposed to get dents and bangs and scratches. ...unless maybe it's a business and you need to show the depreciation expenses.

lwalker
07-15-2009, 10:53 PM
I know what you mean. Three years ago, my then pride-and-joy pearl white Nissan 350Z was left outside in a hailstorm and now bears a distinct resemblance to a golf ball. Everyone said I should get the dents removed but my feeling was exactly as yours: now I don't need to worry about scratching it and I can just have fun driving.




We bought a new Toyota Sienna recently, and in the first 1000 miles, Joy managed to put a foot long scratch and crease in the rear fender. She felt lousy about it, for sure. Me, I was happy and told her I really didn't want to fix it. Now the damn car doesn't own us anymore, and we can actually USE it. . .

oldtiffie
07-15-2009, 11:45 PM
There is a franchise here called "The Touch-up Guys" that seems to be run by very young and healthy and very happy young guys in vans. The signage says their specialty is "touching up" "dings" and scratches etc on car bodies and paint-work - and bumpers etc.

I am retired and the wife and I see a lot of these vans with these happy guys tearing around the place.

They are not as busy as they were - since money got "short" and a lot of men are home more than they were before jobs got "tight" - but they are still tearing around.

They are never around when the men are due home but only when the women have dropped the kids off for/at school or are "home from shopping".

Maybe its all "legit".

There are some quite worried/concerned men though. You'd think they'd be happy if their wives were happy - wouldn't you?

I daresay the chipped paint and scratched bumpers get the attention they deserve.

Its nice to see men happy in their work and satisfied customers.

fasto
07-15-2009, 11:47 PM
In fact, on a few occasions I deliberately parked tight against some dolt who didn't get between the lines in the parking lot just to give him some grief in getting in and backing out. I knew he wouldn't want to scratch his car and I didn't care if he got mine.
Hah, I used to do that with my 'Vette...




Chevette, that is.

Paul Alciatore
07-16-2009, 02:07 AM
White is supposed to be an equal mixture of all colors and black is the complete absense of all color. Grays are inbetween these two, but still with equal parts of all colors. At least those are the definitions.

In the real world, "white" light sources will have a property called color temperature. This is the temperature in degrees Absolute of the source of the light emissions. Reflected light is more complicated but it is defined in reference to radiated light.

Black is a more difficult thing to actually achieve on a solid surface, in the real world. All surfaces will reflect some light and almost all will reflect some colors more than others. So a true black paint is impossible and real black paints will all have slightly different color values. Hence, different blacks will not match.

Scientists who need a good source of white light will construct a box with a small opening. The interior of the box will be heated to the temperature that will radiate the desired "white" light and this light will escape from the small opening as "white" light. But it will have the color temperature of light emitted by an object at the temperature of the inside of the box.

Strangely, when they want a pure black, they will use the same kind of box. The interior will be coated with the best absorbing paint (flat black) they can find. It will have a flat finish to scatter the small percentage of light that is reflected and to discourage direct reflections back to the opening. Thus all light that passes through the small opening, into the box, will be absorbed and none will return outwards throught he small opening. Since the opening emits no visible light radiation, for visible light it is essentially an emitter that has a color temperature of 0 degrees Absolute, more commonly called Absolute Zero. Strictly speaking, this is only true for visible light, not for other forms of radiation as they have very different behavior when they strike the inside walls of the box. This small opening is then the pure, black object or as close as we can get to it at the present time.

As a TV engineer, when I want a pure black to set up the TV cameras, I use a crude version of this kind of box. A hole is cut in the center of a gray scale chart and a box that is painted flat black on the inside is placed behind this hole. This is far better than any black paint or die that could be used to color the chart. Cardboard rectangles that are colored white have to be used for the white reference on the chart as a proper white light emitting box would be over 4000 degrees absolute and a bit arkward on a TV set or even in the maintenance shop.