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Steve Black
07-15-2009, 04:17 PM
I'm a librarian, and the magazine columnist for Library Journal. I'm submitting a column soon about woodworking and metalworking magazines that includes the following paragraph. Is this substantially correct? --
"Machinists cut metal to exacting specifications with lathes, drills, milling machines and grinders. Machinists’ use of tools to carve away unneeded metal distinguishes their craft from smithing metal by striking it, from casting molten metal into a form, and from welding pieces together with high temperatures. Since hobbyists may use multiple techniques in pursuit of their craft, these magazines touch on smithing, casting, and welding, but their focus is on machining. “Dedicated to precision metalworking,” Home Shop Machinist (1982. b-m. $29.95. ISSN 0744-6640) describes projects and techniques for crafting from metal guns, tools, and other functional objects. Machinist's Workshop (1999. b-m. $26.95. ISSN 1521-8112) focuses on shop techniques and beginner’s projects, and Digital Machinist (2006. q. $19.95. ISSN 1933-3773) describes computer operated machining techniques for hobbyists. Despite all coming from the same publisher, the three have distinct content and graphic design."
Thank you!

kf2qd
07-15-2009, 04:18 PM
Not so sure about the "exacting specifications".

What about TLAR (that looks about right)

Carld
07-15-2009, 04:38 PM
Yeah Steve, your description reads about right.

Forrest Addy
07-15-2009, 06:17 PM
Here's my edit:

"Working from plans, drawings, sketches, and samples, machinists manufacture, fit and assemble metal and rigid non metal parts using machine tools such as lathes, drills, milling machines, and grinders. Their work is characterized by close tolerances and fine finishes. Machinists use precision tools to remove metal by cutting it into chips and grinding. This distinguishes their craft from forging or cold working metal by striking it to modify its shape, casting molten metal into a mold, and welding pieces together to form a fabrication using any of several welding processes. Since hobbyists may use multiple techniques in pursuit of their craft, these magazines touch on smithing, casting, and welding, but their focus is on machining. “Dedicated to precision metalworking,” Home Shop Machinist (1982. b-m. $29.95. ISSN 0744-6640) describes projects and techniques for crafting from metal guns, tools, and other functional objects. Machinist's Workshop (1999. b-m. $26.95. ISSN 1521-8112) focuses on shop techniques and beginner’s projects, and Digital Machinist (2006. q. $19.95. ISSN 1933-3773) describes computer operated machining techniques for hobbyists. Despite all coming from the same publisher, the three have distinct content and graphic design."

Yeah, more words but that's the way I am. Someone else take a cut at it. By the time this paragraph gets through a few edits it will be either unrecognizable, so screwed up it will make no sense to anyone, or a masterpiece of concise technical writing.

Edited the edit to add "and rigid non-metal" Thanks for the tune up, Paul.

Paul Alciatore
07-15-2009, 08:49 PM
Not just metal. Almost any solid can be machinned. As an example, plastics are frequently the material of choice.

George Bulliss
07-15-2009, 08:51 PM
Hello Steve,

I am the editor of the three magazines and would be happy to answer any questions you may have. I can be reached at gbulliss(at)villagepress(dot)com

I will make a few comments here in case you choose not to email me.

You have the ISSN numbers and the prices correct on all three magazines.

Regarding the guns, gunsmith projects are only featured in Machinist’s Workshop, not The Home Shop Machinist as you stated.

The word “The” is included in the name for The Home Shop Machinist.

Digital Machinist is directed towards the hobbyist and small machine shops.

I think Forrest did a good job of describing machining processes and I have nothing to add there.

George

Mcgyver
07-15-2009, 09:16 PM
wait until this thread is 9 pages long of arcane need-to-be-right arguments, counter points deep into the minutia....and then we'd like to hear your definition of a "machinist :D

Go with Forrest's def, he's as knowledgeable on the subject as anyone you're going to encounter

oldtiffie
07-15-2009, 09:33 PM
I'm a librarian, and the magazine columnist for Library Journal. I'm submitting a column soon about woodworking and metalworking magazines that includes the following paragraph. Is this substantially correct? --
"Machinists cut metal to exacting specifications with lathes, drills, milling machines and grinders. Machinists’ use of tools to carve away unneeded metal distinguishes their craft from smithing metal by striking it, from casting molten metal into a form, and from welding pieces together with high temperatures. Since hobbyists may use multiple techniques in pursuit of their craft, these magazines touch on smithing, casting, and welding, but their focus is on machining. “Dedicated to precision metalworking,” Home Shop Machinist (1982. b-m. $29.95. ISSN 0744-6640) describes projects and techniques for crafting from metal guns, tools, and other functional objects. Machinist's Workshop (1999. b-m. $26.95. ISSN 1521-8112) focuses on shop techniques and beginner’s projects, and Digital Machinist (2006. q. $19.95. ISSN 1933-3773) describes computer operated machining techniques for hobbyists. Despite all coming from the same publisher, the three have distinct content and graphic design."
Thank you!

My, my - we are self-centred and egotistic - aren't we?

Now re-read the OP's post (my emphasis) where he quite clearly includes, and intentionally or not, gives precedence to "wood-working".

Wood-working and others who use machines are "machinists" as well.

So, either the OP removes the content relating to "wood-working" to accord with the rest of his text and the opinions and bias here - or he doesn't.

If this is to be an informed and informative work in a "learned" publication, the content should not only be correct but consistent with the stated aim and intent of the work.

There should be no justification for bias or inconsistency in this context.

Weston Bye
07-15-2009, 09:57 PM
...describes projects and techniques for crafting from metal guns, tools, and other functional objects..."
Thank you!

Just picking a few nits here, I would rewrite the section as follows:

...describes projects and techniques for crafting tools, guns and other functional objects from metal and other materials...

Placing tools before guns places the emphasis on tools, as it should, gun related articles being a smaller part of the content. Also, you wouldn't go wrong following Forest's suggestions.

wierdscience
07-15-2009, 10:16 PM
The only statue cast to honor Machinists in this country I have been told is of a man standing behind an anvil holding a hammer.Obviously the person depicted is a Blacksmith a highly skilled trade in it's own right.However few gears are ever made on an anvil.

I want to say thank you Steve for taking the time to get the job done right. Are you sure your not a Machinist deep down inside? Attention to detail is a common trait in the trade you know.:)

cboucher
07-16-2009, 10:27 AM
wouldn't necessarily say "techniques for crafting from metal guns" because we all know this, and most of us appreciate this... but in this politically correct world that will probably throw up red flags... "i dont want my kids with magazines on how to make guns"... that kinda crap... i'd just leave that out for fear of not getting the magazines in the library.

Steve Black
07-16-2009, 10:41 AM
Thanks very much for all your replies. Forrest, I'm going to use your wording with the couple of changes George posted.

I should clarify that despite "Journal" in Library Journal's title, it's a magazine consisting mostly of very brief reviews. The purpose of my column is to list good magazines in a topic area. Combining a dozen woodworking and metalworking publications in one column probably doesn't make sense from a craftsman's point of view, but it works for library collection development.

After reading my first draft, my editor suggested adding a description of machining since many librarians aren't familiar with it. Now I just have to hope she doesn't cut much of it back out!

Thanks again for letting me intrude and for the helpful feedback.

Evan
07-16-2009, 11:22 AM
Just one small note: The technical description of machining is that it is a "Subtractive process" in the same manner as sculpture and opposed to Fabrication where pieces are joined by various methods including welding.

Fabrication shops and machine shops frequently co-exist in the same business but are separate disciplines. The home shop machinist may employ both techniques in his work. This is common in the home shop as very few home shops are equipped to cast ferrous metals especially and not many to cast light metals. The home shop machinist is a Jack of all Trades and many are a Master as well.