PDA

View Full Version : DNA assembles itself into machine parts



nheng
08-18-2009, 09:01 AM
Simply incredible ...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2009/aug/07/dna-nanotechnology-machine-components

John Stevenson
08-18-2009, 09:07 AM
I'm not impressed with the involute curve, just imagine a 25 speed box grown out of these rings and inserted into your brain.

Anything above 100 revs would cause your glasses to fall off and give you a right headache.......

.

A.K. Boomer
08-18-2009, 10:29 AM
Technology cracks me up, It really is amazing at what we can do and how far we can go to absolutely nowhere, We will never "catch-up" to all our screw ups - never.
Yet the answer is staring right at us - for most answers to the future look to the past.
Do you think we got here by creating little gears and machine parts and turning them loose in our bodies?
Wonder what livers and kidneys look like after these things have been filtered through them?
Take care of one problem and create 9 more.

My what a bunch of brilliant idiots we've become.

ptjw7uk
08-18-2009, 10:37 AM
Man never looks to the past hence all the repeated mistakes.
History is only off use as a means of keeping score!

Peter

beanbag
08-18-2009, 12:05 PM
I really hate it when popular science articles describe small structures with stupid units like "five millionths of a centimeter" or in units of millionth of a human hair width. How the hell do I know how big that it? Why not just say "500 Angstroms"? EVERYBODY knows how much that is! It's a few hundred atoms across. Duh! ;)

darryl
08-18-2009, 02:14 PM
Yeah, often I wonder how we made it this far as a human race. We have dabs of this, a dash of that. We have awhiles, some, presently- such vague terms for the important things required for survival. :)

Then we have angstroms, the precise period of the cesium atom, and young people these days who have to ask 'how long is 100 centimeters?' How the heck should I know- it's about this long_______________.

I've been told I have a few screws loose. It's not farfetched to think that I've stripped some gear teeth as well. Maybe I could use some of those dna mechanisms.

Maybe I should go read the article now.

darryl
08-18-2009, 02:18 PM
Ok, I didn't get much past the picture. Can't imagine all that rattling around in my head. Would interfere with all the other loose stuff.

toastydeath
08-18-2009, 05:29 PM
As far as I can tell, certain older people of every generation have complained about how the downfall of civilization is imminent because of this or that or the other thing is changing and there are insurmountable problems in society and the kids these days just don't have any respect and stay off my lawn. We have historical record of this going on explicitly since the ancient Greeks, at the very least.

I'm sure when somebody came up with the first handle on a stone axe, somebody thought that was the worst thing ever because we didn't get where we are by swinging axes with handles, goddamnit, we got here by holding them in our hands like normal people.

Frank Ford
08-18-2009, 06:04 PM
As far as I can tell, certain older people of every generation have complained about how the downfall of civilization is imminent because of this or that or the other thing is changing and there are insurmountable problems in society and the kids these days just don't have any respect and stay off my lawn. We have historical record of this going on explicitly since the ancient Greeks, at the very least.


So right you are, Toasty.

I'm one geezer who doesn't go around decrying the failings of the current young generation - I heard enuf of that growing up. Fact is, MY generation has a lot to do with what's wrong with the new one. I won't go into details or discuss the politics of this situation because readers of this forum either know and understand them, or will deny the validity what's presented.

Meanwhile, the pace of technological development is stunning to say the least, and I'm envious already of the young folks who will outlive me to see what comes about!

Fasttrack
08-18-2009, 08:00 PM
This is far more practical than machine parts...

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/fasttrack237/smileyellow.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA_origami

nheng
08-19-2009, 04:26 PM
I'm surprised at all the negativism toward this technology. Just look at the practical side. You're rebuilding an old machine, disassemble and toss the parts from a major assembly into your parts cleaner. Hit the agitate button, the parts get cleaned then swim around a bit more and bam ... it puts itself back together :D

Evan
08-19-2009, 07:53 PM
Self assembling machines aren't exactly something new. That's what we are. It's what DNA is for, to code how raw materials are to be combined to make functional mechanisms.