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daryl bane
08-18-2009, 11:43 PM
I just finished making this new dial assy for my Monarch EE,and even though they're not quite finished, I was so tickled, I had to post a pic. These are made out of S/S billet out of the junk pile, I think 304, as it certainly wasn't free machining. I cheated and had a friend do the grads. on his CNC, but I did the numbers on my trusty Gorton. The matt finish is bead blast.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v417/brufsupbane/168-6876_IMG.jpg

uncle pete
08-18-2009, 11:54 PM
Daryl, I'd guess you were "tickled" From the pictures that is proffesional quality work. A simple that's nice doesn't quite cut it on work that pretty.

Pete

tony ennis
08-19-2009, 12:11 AM
Gorgeous!!

hawgwrench
08-19-2009, 08:10 AM
I just finished making this new dial assy for my Monarch EE,and even though they're not quite finished, I was so tickled, I had to post a pic. These are made out of S/S billet out of the junk pile, I think 304, as it certainly wasn't free machining. I cheated and had a friend do the grads. on his CNC, but I did the numbers on my trusty Gorton. The matt finish is bead blast.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v417/brufsupbane/168-6876_IMG.jpg
Absolutely gorgeous....thats like a piece of jewelry.You took alotta time with this and it shows. Good job!

John Stevenson
08-19-2009, 08:16 AM
Awesome, whats the front and back dials for ?

Ken_Shea
08-19-2009, 08:36 AM
Outstanding !!!!!!!!!!!!

j king
08-19-2009, 08:39 AM
John.

I know the rear dial is .250 increments and numbered in inches. I have that on mine. I need to hobble out and see if I have outer set.

Jim

Peter.
08-19-2009, 09:19 AM
If I was twice as skilled as I am I'd still not be half skilled-enough to produce something that professional-looking. Truly outstanding!

A.K. Boomer
08-19-2009, 09:39 AM
Daryl, that has to be one of the best photo's iv ever seen on here, your work is meticulous and your photo is perfect.

Ed P
08-19-2009, 09:51 AM
I only wish I could do that quality of work. I have a question
though. Why the four different line lengths? Is that a Monarch
thing?

Ed P

daryl bane
08-19-2009, 10:06 AM
Many Many thanks for all the kind words. The graduation lengths are just, I guess a Monarch thing, I just copied what they did. The two dials are linked by gearing, the inner dial counting rev/divisions of the outer one. And the outer outer one is keyed to the leadscrew itself and can be be used as a vernier/etc. in conjunction with the movable numbered dial.

lynnl
08-19-2009, 10:52 AM
Yep, all the prior attaboys - goes double for me.

I don't understand your comment "...but I did the numbers on my trusty Gorton.."
Did you engrave them with your Gorton? Or use that for stamping them?
We are talking about a Gorton vertical mill, right?

Beautiful job regardless.

daryl bane
08-19-2009, 11:26 AM
Lynnl, A Gorton P1-2 Pantograph Engraver was used. There are many more of these than the mills that they made, in fact, I think pantographs is what made Gorton famous. CNC engravers have all but rendered the lowly manual pantograph into the dustbin of machine tools, but they still can do good work.

Paul Alciatore
08-19-2009, 11:29 AM
Wowwoo!

Really nice job.

I like the four length divisions on the scales. Makes it a lot easier to read.

Only problem is you will stand back and look at it every time you walk up to the machine. At least, I would.

lazlo
08-19-2009, 01:52 PM
Absolutely stunning machine work Darryl!

At this point, do you think it would have been less work to just build a 10EE from scratch? :D

Bguns
08-19-2009, 03:06 PM
Pretty :)

Looks like a bit more radius on handle nut would make it perfect :) :)

pcarpenter
08-19-2009, 03:31 PM
In my book, that's the sort of work that should *require* that you hand sign it somewhere so that someone will know it was "shop made" Otherwise, that's not obvious and the guy who buys your Monarch after you die will get asked "gee I wonder who makes those replacement dials for a Monarch EE":D

Very nicely done and nice photography....the lighting is nice and even which is often a bugaboo in lots of shop photography. Glare and shadows tend to make details disappear. Likewise, the absence of glare or shadow makes for a great representation of just how great the product looks and makes the images look really professional.

Paul

daryl bane
08-19-2009, 03:34 PM
"Looks like a bit more radius on handle nut would make it perfect". Ha Ha , you got me there, I made that one years ago, an stuck it on there. I guess I'll have to radius it alittle better. :) Big Thanks Paul, I think I was lucky, I have a well lit shop and it makes taking pics easy. And that is a good idea, I can put some identification of the maker on the inside.

Pherdie
08-19-2009, 03:36 PM
Exquisite workmanship!!

S_J_H
08-19-2009, 04:47 PM
Hot Dayum! That's slicker than the devil in velvet pants!:eek:

spkrman15
08-19-2009, 05:44 PM
Wow...beautifull work. Absolutely beautifull

Rob :)

Falcon67
08-19-2009, 06:14 PM
"We're not worthy! We're not worthy!" Very nicely done.

lane
08-19-2009, 06:19 PM
Now I call that the work of a Master. Some of the best I have seen.

daryl bane
08-19-2009, 06:42 PM
Geez, A big super Thanks! from everybody. You guys are the best. Except for the engraving, its all mainly straight lathe work with alittle milling thrown in. Alot of chips though.

QSIMDO
08-19-2009, 07:38 PM
If I had a dial like that I'd throw my lathe away.
Stunning!

Hal
08-19-2009, 07:45 PM
Len

The rest of Daryl's lathe is every bit as nice.

Hal

Langanobob
08-20-2009, 06:14 AM
Len

The rest of Daryl's lathe is every bit as nice.

Hal

Beautiful work - and...I also think some recognition should go to the long gone original designers and craftsmen who created a machine that inspires such work.

oldtiffie
08-20-2009, 06:38 AM
Fabulous - absolutely fabulous.

Peter.
08-20-2009, 01:51 PM
I have a question about the pic. In the top-left corner there is a thin dovetail-shaped piece under the cross-slide on top of the larger dovetail. What is it's purpose?

John Stevenson
08-20-2009, 01:55 PM
Sliding chip guard to cover the feed screw.

lynnl
08-20-2009, 02:11 PM
What sort of cutter was used in the CNC to cut the graduations? I assume it was rotating.
And for that matter, what was used in the pantograph?

Was some blacking material applied after all the engraving?

daryl bane
08-20-2009, 03:33 PM
Peter, Sir John is correct. When the crosslide moves almost to the end of its travel, it exposes the crosslide leadscrew, cavity, a sliding plate is employed to cover this and retracts as the cross slide is brought back home. Lynnl, I ground up some carbide single edge engraving cutters for this and used the same cutter for both operations. My friends CNC top speed is about 7000rpm which is alittle slow for engraving, but worked just fine. I ran the Gorton doing the numbers at 18,000rpm. which is about the standard speed for this type of engraving. I found a can of black Hermatite (British) engine lacquer to work great.

Mcgyver
08-20-2009, 07:21 PM
beautiful work! congrats

jackary
08-21-2009, 06:04 AM
Absolutely beautiful Daryl, any chance of more pics of your lathe?
Alan

daryl bane
08-21-2009, 10:14 AM
Yep, they'll be a comming, this was the last piece of a 10 yr project/ restoration.