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brian Rupnow
08-25-2009, 12:35 PM
Quite literally!!! I called around yesterday to a couple of photocopier repair shops, asking if I could root thru their "Junk bin" in search of any small gears that they might be throwing away. One of the repair shops said that they no longer repaired the old non digital copiers, but that I could come over and have their entire stock of "New" spare parts of the shelves, as they no longer had any use for them. In addition to what you see in the picture, they also gave me two enormous old photocopiers, complete, that are full of gears, sprockets, and miniature drive chains. Unfortunatey, most of the gears are nylon, but Hey---I can work with that!!! However right now, I am tired of playing with model steam engines, tired of reading books, tired of playing on the internet----In short, I need some real work. I sure hope things pick up soon and I get a design contract before I go absolutely gaga.---Brian
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/gears002-1.jpg

camdigger
08-25-2009, 01:21 PM
Good find Brian!

Years ago, before the dumps clamped down, I went through a local dump and ripped out the transmissions of several wringer washers. All metal gears at least 3 pairs per machine, and lots of helical pairs.

Might be another source for you.
Cam

uncle pete
08-25-2009, 01:53 PM
Good score, You could now build a light duty Geometric chuck, Goggle it, An amazing piece of equipment invented a few hundred years ago.

Pete

davidfe
08-25-2009, 06:37 PM
Brian,

Nice score. Don't forget the electronics too...switches, micro switches,
beautiful ground rods and stepper motors. Lots more.

Enjoy.

Black_Moons
08-25-2009, 07:45 PM
I even got a 1/3hp 3600/28rpm output gearmotor outta a laser photocopyer once. and some chain and spockets.

awsome stuff in them. tons of motors and solanoids. you'll find those *wide* nylon gears to transmit a supriseing amount of power, and the bevel ones will be very quite :)

brian Rupnow
08-25-2009, 08:08 PM
I just know I'm going to do something crazy with some of these gears----
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/FULLASSYHITANDMISSENGINE-5.jpg
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/th_CHUCKSHORIZONTAL-CONVENTIONALVALVIN.jpg (http://s307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/?action=view&current=CHUCKSHORIZONTAL-CONVENTIONALVALVIN.flv)

oldtiffie
08-25-2009, 08:15 PM
Funny you should mention that Brian.

Only in the last few days, I got sick and tired of my A3 photocopier which was getting increasingly more unreliable and difficult to use. It was "chock-a-block" full of gears shafts, screws and electronics. I pulled it apart to the last screw and separated the PCB's and other electronics out and took it all to the tip (waste disposal) yesterday.

I bought a "Brother" laser multi-function centre (MFC) as it does a very good and quick job as a printer, scanner, copier and fax. Cost was excellent. It was only only a few hundred dollars and the consumables ("toner" and "drum") are relatively cheap and readily available. If I have a problem that is "out of warranty" (2 years) and too expensive to fix I will just upgrade/replace (read: dump) it.

The old copier owed me nothing as I had 4 good years out of it. It only cost me AU$100 ~ US$85 with two full bottles of toner "thrown in" - and delivered and set up. It was a redundant unit then that nobody wanted and it got the owner a 100 bucks as well as saving him shelf space or dumping fees. He was passing here anyway. His side-line was servicing photo-copies. He had provided our (always redundant but very useful) copiers for years, and he like I, was retiring. So it all worked out very well.

I couldn't see me needing any of those gears etc. - so out they went.

lakeside53
08-25-2009, 08:41 PM
Yep.... Desktop film/print processors are full of gears and shafts - that last one I did has 46 stainless shafts and a few hundred gears. And... heaters, motors, pumps.. gold in my eyes:D

wtrueman
08-26-2009, 12:41 AM
Another thing in there is some Al. I got an a very good machined tube that I really have no use for but...? probably will find a neat home for it maybe :) Wayne. PS. I'm also watching the price of scrap Al; so who knows. Wayne.

malbenbut
08-26-2009, 04:11 AM
Quote by Brian Rupnow
[I just know I'm going to do some thing crazy with some of these gears

How about a steam powered table feed for your milling machine.
MBB

David Powell
08-26-2009, 08:48 AM
When I had virtually no money to spend on machines I built a little drill press using a bottle capper and a motor from a defunct photocopier. Later on an old friend gave me a small ancient toolpost grinder,( Which looked like it was intended to be driven from an overhead countershaft )by then I was able to buy a cheap drill press so I fitted the photocopy motor to the grinder. Nearly 20 yrs later it is still in use and looks like it will outlast me. An other man's junk can be your gold. Regards David Powell.

brian Rupnow
08-26-2009, 01:11 PM
Something really, really crazy---
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/FULLASSYHITANDMISSENGINEWITHGEARSAN.jpg

camdigger
08-26-2009, 02:28 PM
Ain't half crazy.

I would suggest biasing the axles such that the machine rolls in a circle though. I've seen pictures of Rudy K.'s traction engine doing laps of a barrel end at a show. I have no recollecetion of what might have been done to keep the airline to the boiler from wrapping up and twisting off though...

john hobdeclipe
08-26-2009, 02:34 PM
Something really, really crazy---
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/FULLASSYHITANDMISSENGINEWITHGEARSAN.jpg

Well, all you need to do now is have the undriven wheels turn an air compressor that will pump air into the motor. Then we can have another long thread about perpetual motion machines, and perhaps you could get a government grant to develop it, and a website to sell shares in it, and you'll get rich, and you'll remember who told you so, and spread your wealth amongst all your cyber-consultants.

David Powell
08-26-2009, 09:22 PM
Your transmission is the wrong way round, a belt drive should be a primary drive, A single cylinder steam engine( especially a single acting one) produces quite vicious power impulses when trying to start a vehicle from rest, a gear reduction prior to the belt makes things even worse. Simply reverse things use the belt( of whatever sort) as the initial speed reduction and have the gears as the final drive. I rode behind a Mamod stationary engine, fitted on a meccano frame some 45 yrs ago. An attempt to have a vee belt as final drive on a model steam roller while I made gears was a total failure. A toothed belt might have a chance of success on light duty but would be prone to stripping belt teeth if worked hard. regards David Powell.

brian Rupnow
08-27-2009, 07:42 AM
David---I agree with you 100%, however, since this thing is purely a flight of fancy, it is more a matter of "what fits" than of a practical application. This thing is very light at any rate, so i don't think it will matter all that much.---and if it doesn't work, I can change it.--this is just a time killing exercise anyways.---Brian

David Powell
08-27-2009, 09:05 AM
Brian, if you ever get a chance look up the Richmond Hill Live Steamers site and come down to an " Open House" I am sure you will enjoy yourself. Regards David Powell.

brian Rupnow
08-27-2009, 11:32 AM
For lack of a better name, I'm going to call this thing the "DOODLEBUG". ---Does it ever look neat with the engine running and all those gears whizzing around.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/DOODLEBUG-2001.jpg

brian Rupnow
08-27-2009, 04:59 PM
Just like Mr. Darwins monkey, its evolving---
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/FULLASSYHITANDMISSENGINEWITHGEAR-1.jpg

David Powell
08-27-2009, 07:57 PM
and I will provide it with some steam to add "flavour", regards David Powell.

studentjim
08-27-2009, 08:20 PM
Your transmission is the wrong way round, a belt drive should be a primary drive, A single cylinder steam engine( especially a single acting one) produces quite vicious power impulses when trying to start a vehicle from rest, a gear reduction prior to the belt makes things even worse. Simply reverse things use the belt( of whatever sort) as the initial speed reduction and have the gears as the final drive. I rode behind a Mamod stationary engine, fitted on a meccano frame some 45 yrs ago. An attempt to have a vee belt as final drive on a model steam roller while I made gears was a total failure. A toothed belt might have a chance of success on light duty but would be prone to stripping belt teeth if worked hard. regards David Powell.

David, I agree with your theory, but have you seen the belt driven motorcycles?

brian Rupnow
08-28-2009, 04:24 PM
Okay---I warned you it was going to get crazy---
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/th_RUNNINGONOFFICEFLOOR.jpg (http://s307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/?action=view&current=RUNNINGONOFFICEFLOOR.flv)

Black_Moons
08-28-2009, 05:02 PM
Awsome, you could make a new drifting movie: Fast and the non ferrous.

David Powell
08-28-2009, 05:44 PM
Now that it runs tie a string to your office chair and get it to tow you round the shop!!! You will soon be building real steamers. regards David Powell.

1937 Chief
08-28-2009, 07:24 PM
I saw something interesting one time. It was about a cubic ft squart with clear plastic sides. It had gears and shafts cantained within the cube going everywhich way, and did absolutly nothing. It had one inlet shaft for power. Looks like you have a good start for something like that. Have fun. Stan

uncle pete
08-28-2009, 07:33 PM
Black Moons,
The fast and the non ferrous, Now that was really clever, I'm ROTFLMAO,
Good one.

Pete

ckelloug
08-28-2009, 07:56 PM
I guess we'll just have to call Black Moons a member of the Aluminatti

brian Rupnow
08-29-2009, 01:06 PM
This is where I am eventually going with this "Doodlebug". The grey transparent disc is 36" diameter 3/4" plywood. The red tether is a rigid 3/16" diameter rod and goes from the side of the Doodlebug to a post in the center of the plywood disc. You can see that I plan on modifying the front wheels to be on an angle such that the Doodlebug will actually steer in a circle without having to skid as it drives around. The air supply will come up the center of the blue post and then thru a swivel air fitting out to the Doodlebug.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/MACHINERUNNINGONPLYWOODCIRCLE.jpg

Weston Bye
08-29-2009, 01:16 PM
Drive only one of the wheels and let the other one freewheel on the axle, otherwise you'll need a differential to prevent one or the other of the drive wheels from scuffing.

Or (idea) make the drive wheels different diameters.

brian Rupnow
08-30-2009, 10:25 AM
This is beginning to get really interesting. You can see the purchased "swivel air fitting" ($10.00 at Princess Auto) at the top of the steel center tube. The pale yellow tube that reaches from the air swivel fitting out towards the Doodlebug is a rigid 5/16" O. D. copper tube. It has a hinged joint where it attaches to the Doodlebug. It also has a short section of 3/16" tube soldered into the outboard end of it, which is connected with a peice of clear neoprene flex tubing to the infeed pipe on the cylinder of the engine. Air supply will come into the bottom of the center pipe thru the bottom, underneath the plywood disk. The rigid pale yellow peice of 5/16" copper tubing will act as a radius arm, and air will flow thru it out to the engine. This way the engine should run around the perimeter of the plywood disc all day without twisting any lines off.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/MACHINERUNNINGONPLYWOODCIRCLE-1.jpg

camdigger
08-31-2009, 11:36 AM
I saw something interesting one time. It was about a cubic ft squart with clear plastic sides. It had gears and shafts cantained within the cube going everywhich way, and did absolutly nothing. It had one inlet shaft for power. Looks like you have a good start for something like that. Have fun. Stan


Maybe Brian should look up Rube Goldberg??!? That name is synonymous with outrageously overly complicated mechanical marvels that do simple tasks or accomplish nothing. Seems a geat idea to use up some copier gears and burn up some time while passing tsome time in the shop :).

Duffy
08-31-2009, 11:54 AM
This is beginning to get really interesting. You can see the purchased "swivel air fitting" ($10.00 at Princess Auto) at the top of the steel center tube. The pale yellow tube that reaches from the air swivel fitting out towards the Doodlebug is a rigid 5/16" O. D. copper tube. It has a hinged joint where it attaches to the Doodlebug. It also has a short section of 3/16" tube soldered into the outboard end of it, which is connected with a peice of clear neoprene flex tubing to the infeed pipe on the cylinder of the engine. Air supply will come into the bottom of the center pipe thru the bottom, underneath the plywood disk. The rigid pale yellow peice of 5/16" copper tubing will act as a radius arm, and air will flow thru it out to the engine. This way the engine should run around the perimeter of the plywood disc all day without twisting any lines off.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/MACHINERUNNINGONPLYWOODCIRCLE-1.jpg
This is a really neat system Brian. Could I suggest that, since you fabricate almost everything anyway, that you make a banjo fitting for the center post, rather than the commercial swivel. It will provide a straight-line connection at the level of the doodle bug, and might increase the gee whiz factor a bit, since the energy source will be less obvious. Since air pressures are low, o-ring seals on a banjo should work just fine. Duffy

brian Rupnow
08-31-2009, 12:06 PM
I chose the swivel fitting I am using because it not only swivels round and round like you would expect, but also because the grey portion of the swivel will swivel up and down. This "Up and down swiveling" combined with a hinge type attachment to the Doodlebug will help to keep all 4 wheels of the Doodlebug in contact with the plywood.---And yes, I know who Rube Goldberg and Gyro Gearloose are----also Boob McNutt----and if I don't get some real work pretty damn soon, I'm going to be as nutty as they were.

camdigger
08-31-2009, 01:57 PM
Well, if you're really looking for something to do, there's always the Tetra Society and the like who make gizmos to make disabled people's life a little more palatable. Seems a natural fit for anyone with a talent for machine design, a shop, and some extra time. Be an opportunity to keep those design skills sharp too.

Just a suggestion, I know it's really none of my business and that volunteer work isn't for everyone.

brian Rupnow
08-31-2009, 02:35 PM
Well, if you're really looking for something to do, there's always the Tetra Society and the like who make gizmos to make disabled people's life a little more palatable. Seems a natural fit for anyone with a talent for machine design, a shop, and some extra time. Be an opportunity to keep those design skills sharp too.

Just a suggestion, I know it's really none of my business and that volunteer work isn't for everyone.

I have never heard of Tetra Society. Thanks---I will look it up.---Brian

camdigger
08-31-2009, 04:21 PM
I'm a bit surprised you hadn't heard of them. I heard from them from a internet aquaintance on this and other boards. FWIW, their website is.. http://www.tetrasociety.org/

brian Rupnow
09-01-2009, 07:27 PM
And here we have it!! I have been wanting to try this for some time now, and it works---very well. The video says it all.---Brian
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/th_DOODLEBUGUNDERPOWER.jpg (http://s307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/?action=view&current=DOODLEBUGUNDERPOWER.flv)