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gearhead
08-30-2009, 05:18 PM
Saw two Lincoln pipeliner type generators welders parked next to a warehouse in my neck of the world. Had a quick chance to look the welders over and they are well used and very rusty. Never one to shy away from a project can these welders be brought back to life. Unknown if they run and unknown if the welding guts still work.

I'm finishing my DoAll C12 bandsaw project and looking for something else to spend money on. I can rebuild the motors, if parts are still avail, but not sure about the electrical side of the welders. Are they complicated and are the parts still availalble for a possible rebuild.

And any thoughts on what to offer for the rusty hulks as they are right now. gearhead

Tim S
08-30-2009, 09:46 PM
Here's a couple of good resources.


http://billswelderrepair.com/Engine-Drives.html

http://www.aws.org/cgi-bin/mwf/board_show.pl?bid=44

http://stumpfweldingsupplies.com/



I've got a '73 model that I'm working on now. They're pretty tough welders.

macona
08-31-2009, 03:09 PM
Brushes and the like are available but id there is any serious issues with with the stator or rotor then they are scrap.

gearhead
08-31-2009, 07:11 PM
"Brushes and the like are available but id there is any serious issues with with the stator or rotor then they are scrap."

If problems exist with the stator or rotor can they be replaced at a
reasonable cost.

macona
09-01-2009, 04:13 AM
No, they are not available. Could be rewound but that would be as much as a new machine.

gearhead
09-01-2009, 07:09 AM
Thanks for the info, very important stuff to know. Just may pass on the machines. gear

rancherbill
09-01-2009, 01:25 PM
How much do they want for them? Do they run.

Which models are they?

Some are more in demand than others, On the welding forums there are guys that love restoring them to way better than new.

macona
09-01-2009, 05:23 PM
Way better than new old machine is still not as good as a new modern machine.

Tim S
09-02-2009, 05:48 PM
Unless they're free I agree on passing.

On the other hand if you could try them out and they work they are better than no welder.


The red face machines do have an almost cult like following. You may can turn a few $'s if priced right.

gearhead
09-03-2009, 08:07 AM
Trying to decide which direction to go with them. They are not going to be free and any means. May be able to make one work out of the two avail...sc

Roy Andrews
09-10-2009, 09:46 AM
Way better than new old machine is still not as good as a new modern machine.

i hardily disagree. i have an old pipeliner with a tag that says it was rebuilt by lincoln in the 50s. these are the nicest running dc welders i have ever welded with. unlike the new welders with their screaming, high rpm motors. they are quiet and reliable.

R W
09-11-2009, 07:25 AM
i hardily disagree. i have an old pipeliner with a tag that says it was rebuilt by lincoln in the 50s. these are the nicest running dc welders i have ever welded with. unlike the new welders with their screaming, high rpm motors. they are quiet and reliable.

AGREE WITH YOU.

Carm
09-11-2009, 09:02 AM
As a former pipeliner, I'd agree that an old 200 up to snuff will out do a new machine, and I'm a devotee of Lincoln for portables.
I could weld a brother in laws rod to the pipe at the top if we fired up together.
Had enough snort I stopped grinding beads and just had my helper put 'er on max for hot pass.

#66B
09-11-2009, 10:01 PM
I agree with Carm 100%, I am still on the pipeline & using one of new state of the art machines with a Duetz engine (Company machine) But at home I have (5) SA 200's , contract welded for years, then signed on with a union utility company. When welding pipeline these machine set the standards years ago & I think they still weld much better than any other welders(new type) I have used.

A while back I watched an old short hood 200 on E-Bay, it was sitting in the weeds & they said in the add it was froze up, it brought $580.00

I would take a chance on them, might be OK in the welding end, the old Continentals with some TLC will run forever.

Good Luck on your venture!!!

Don Young
09-12-2009, 12:40 AM
My experience with the old Continental engines has been that parts are mostly available but you will spend a lot more rebuilding it than you would to rebuild a small block Chevy. They are very simple and reliable engines.

Don Young

jdunmyer
09-22-2009, 09:16 PM
Years ago, my wife bought 2 Lincoln M/G welders that her refinery was scrapping out. Sealed bid deal, condition unknown, machines were 1950's vintage, I think she paid $50.00/each. I had an idea of cutting one in half and connecting an engine, until I found out that the motor is in the center, with the welding generator on one end, exciter generator on the other. When I got 3-phase 480-volt power, I dragged 'em out and did some checking:

One was 480-volt, the other was 550-volt. The latter ran OK with my power, the other didn't. I determined that the one that ran had a bad generator, so swapped the stator from the 550-volt job onto the 480-volt machine. Had to flash it a couple of times to get it to generate, using 4 12-volt batteries in series on the exciter field.

These machines are rated at 70 amps up to about 400, that's the biggest disadvantage. However, I've been using the one I got running, with the 550-volt stator, since about 1980. I really like it a bunch. I set it up outside my shop in "Bay 2" of the barn, with the control panel facing the wall and extensions on the controls. Heavy cables connect to a pair of welding jacks on the welding bench, also to a pair of jacks in "Bay 2". The latter location is where all welding is done these days; I should probably turn the thing around.

see http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer/others/jun09_02.jpg for a pic of the control panel.

macona
09-23-2009, 04:22 AM
Nice. That helps with the noise.

I used to work on the big brother of your machine, the SAE-600, for one of the local steel mills. We didnt have real 480 to run these machines and I really did not want to rewire them every time they came in so we had a big transformer. These things pull a heck of a lot. They will dim the lights even with a place with a large service. I started smoking our 240-480 transformer one time!

These machines are great for air arcing. No diodes to burn out.

Usually all it takes to flash is to short one brush holder to the other on the exciter. That usually gets the exciter up and running and the rest of the machine takes off. I have used a battery charger as well.

I did fire one up one time and dried mouse parts came flying out chopped up by the big fan!

jdunmyer
09-23-2009, 10:05 AM
There's one of these machines at Buckley, but it's like yours, BIG! IIRC, it goes from about 150 amps up to 600 or so, pretty useless in a home shop environment.

As I didn't have any #10 wire at the time, I connected mine with #12. The motor is about 20 Hp, so should really have #10, but I figured that I'd never use the machine anywhere near the 400+ amp setting. In the nearly 30 years I've been using it, that presumption has held. :-)

As you say, it's really nice for air arcing; I had a job once where it ran for a full day, powering an Arc-Air "torch", then welding. I think the torch required about 200-250 amps.

It has a relatively high OC voltage, so strikes up easily, unless you have to crank the "fine voltage" control down for welding thin stuff with 3/32" rod. It was a heckuva step up from the old Lincoln buzz box, lemme tell ya!

There were 2 or 3 Lincoln M/G welders at a recent auction that I attended, but they were those vertical-shaft "torpedo" units. Didn't see what they went for.