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T-Slot
02-06-2002, 09:29 PM
The green wheel on my pedestal grinder doesn't run true, causing the grinder to vibrate. What do you use to dress these wheels? I see diamond pointed dressers but how do you hold them steady against the rest?

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metal mite
02-06-2002, 09:38 PM
t
best is to get a dresser built like a screwdriver. or a diamound and mount it in a steel bar for a handle.
with two hands you can dress a wheel pretty good. just like cutting on a wood lath.
those star wheel dressers are a pain.
m

bspooh
02-06-2002, 10:09 PM
I bought from Enco a little diamond dresser..It has about 7 or so diamonds on the face, and I use that to dress my grinding wheels with great success...I think it was about 25 dollars...The best thing i ever used was a mine drill bit thingy,,,it was a 1 1/4 tube with tons of diamonds on the face...worked awesome...

brent

T-Slot
02-06-2002, 10:34 PM
Don't you need a way to hook the dresser over the rest[like the star wheel dressers] so it trues the wheel and doesn't just follow the contour?

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Thrud
02-07-2002, 01:17 AM
T-Slot

Make a holder for the rod type Diamond dresser so you can follow a straight path. Don't dawdle while running the diamond across the face or it defeats the purpose of the diamond in the first place.

Dave

T-Slot
02-07-2002, 06:49 AM
Thanks all, Is a diamond tool in fact the only way to dress a green wheel?

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Thrud
02-07-2002, 11:23 PM
The only wheel you do not use them on is CBN and Diamond. These require special truing wheels.

Dave

snorman
02-07-2002, 11:30 PM
For dressing an alum. oxide wheel, I bought a cheap diamond dresser stick (1/2X6, 1/4 caret) from Travers. I was going to make a holder for it but then got the idea of holding it in a small v-block and running it across the front of the tool rest on the grinder. Surprisingly it worked just fine on light passes; not brave enough to try a heavy pass. :-) Leaves the wheel nice and smooth but not very agressive in cutting action. Fine for finish grinding on a lathe tool. I see no reason why it wouldn't work as well on a carbide wheel. For agressive cutting, the star dresser may be better however, or perhaps one of the multipoint dressers. You want the green wheel really sharp to cut carbide tools.

T-Slot
02-08-2002, 07:30 AM
Thanks again, but what I want to know is can you dress a silicon carbide wheel with anything else, or does it have to be diamond?

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Thrud
02-08-2002, 11:20 PM
Actually you can buy CBN sticks to true any wheel except CBN or Diamond. Usually the CBN sticks are SOOOOO expensive a cheap Diamond dresser is far more attactive (under $10 form Lee Valley Tools).

So your answer is a CBN stick or a Diamond Dresser.

Dave
By the way, the "green" wheel you are refering to is Silicon Carbide or SiC - they also can be black in colour (usually only mounted points are black or green)

[This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 02-08-2002).]

Oso
02-09-2002, 12:37 AM
A while back I put a new wheel (pink Alo2) on my grinder, and realized no diamond, it had gotten messed up and I was supposed to have gotten another one.

So, I decided to try a chipped carbide insert, figuring why not, its supposed to be hard.

To my surprise, the wheel proceeded to cut that carbide insert, and sharpened several other brazed cutters, without becoming noticeably worn (or trued up, either, for that matter).

And I had always thought that only the green wheels worked on carbide.

snorman
02-09-2002, 10:09 PM
Oso>Alum. oxide is harder than carbide and will cut it a little bit but are not a good long term solution. They dull quickly and the bond is too hard for the wheel to break down easily and present new sharp cutting edges to the workpiece, which is how the SIC wheels work. That's probably oversimplified, but that's my experience with grinding wheels.

Pink wheel you say? I'm wondering if that's a surface grinder wheel; they are normally much softer than pedestal grinder wheels. By softer I mean the bond of course. Might be dangerous using a surface grinder wheel on a pedestal grinder.(Not saying you are of course.) I've seen a lot of them burst when pushed too hard on surface grinders. That's usually not too big a deal on a surface grinder but I wouldn't want to see it happen on a pedestal grinder!

Just to add: Star dressers work pretty well on SIC wheels; use plenty of pressure to break the bond and work the dresser across the wheel to keep it flat. The dresser is rested on the tool rest to keep good control.
Always wear safety glasses at a minimum.

snorman

[This message has been edited by snorman (edited 02-09-2002).]

Thrud
02-09-2002, 10:55 PM
Oso
Pink wheels are ceramic abrasive (at least the ones I have seen) - harder than Aluminum Oxide.

Dave