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View Full Version : DRILL DOCTOR??



ZINOM
09-16-2003, 02:11 AM
I am seriously thinking of picking up one of these units, they seem to be a legit product that would be of use for some time to come.

However, I don't know which model I need....one model is for 118 degree drills, and the other is for 118 and 135.....now bear in mind I'm new to this, but after checking the angles on a few drills that I use commonly, they didn't seem to be either of those angles exactly....I'm wondering how much difference it makes if I got the one for 118 and conformed my drills to that spec as they needed sharpening.
Or would I be better off conforming them all to 135 as the need arose?

If I can get away with all my drills being 118, that would be cheaper I believe.

I work mostly in 1018, brass, and cast bronze, and use drills from 5/64-25/64 (roughly)with a center drill to start most holes if that has any bearing on anything.

Thanks for taking the time....my knowledge is limited and common sense only goes SO far.

John

dnsbss
09-16-2003, 06:08 AM
I have one that I have hardly used but it works great. Tool Crib has the 750 model for $129 freight paid. Comes with a storage case which joy will want,unless you use it everyday.

Paul Gauthier
09-16-2003, 06:56 AM
I have one also, good tool. They come with a fine grit wheel, but one can order a coarse grit wheel from their website. You will want it. If I remember right it was about $20.00. Worth it.

------------------
Paul G.

kruszert
09-16-2003, 07:55 AM
I have a Drill Doctor and have been very happy with it. I have sharpened many bits including cobalt bits with no problem. As for your question about 118 vs. 135 degree point angle - - 118 is the general purpose bit angle and will easily do all that you mentioned. 135 degree point angle is used on heavy duty bits for drilling stainless and hard steels. 135 points don't drill quite as fast but don't chip or break as much and also work fine in regular stuff. For a home shop you probably won't be able to tell the difference.

dhammer
09-16-2003, 08:03 AM
My lady bought me the Handyman model for my birthday.. works great but this model only sharpens up to 1/2 drills. Get the bigger model.

Oso
09-16-2003, 09:06 AM
Got one, used to think it was great. Sharpened a couple dozen drills fine.

Now I am thinking it is a hunk of trash.

Wheel is perfect, but for the last few months it won't grind ANYTHING correctly. I have to guess at the right angles, the setup in the front always grinds a negative rake.

Kinda stupid when the heel is higher than the edge.........and you can't get it set any better unless you ignore the directions.....and even then it isn't quite right.

The idea is fine, the execution is trashy, just won't stand up to use, even though I am careful with tools, I don't beat on them. But this just was not worth the money. I wouldn't pay ANYTHING for one.

This is the 500 model.

Get one of those little "General" drill sharpening stands. It will work much better than the Drill doctor. And in 5 or 10 years it will still work just as well.

BTW, drill doctor co didn't bother to reply to my inquiries. I guess they already have my money......

happy02
09-16-2003, 10:01 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Oso:
Got one, used to think it was great. Sharpened a couple dozen drills fine.

Now I am thinking it is a hunk of trash.

Wheel is perfect, but for the last few months it won't grind ANYTHING correctly. I have to guess at the right angles, the setup in the front always grinds a negative rake.

Kinda stupid when the heel is higher than the edge.........and you can't get it set any better unless you ignore the directions.....and even then it isn't quite right.

The idea is fine, the execution is trashy, just won't stand up to use, even though I am careful with tools, I don't beat on them. But this just was not worth the money. I wouldn't pay ANYTHING for one.

This is the 500 model.

Get one of those little "General" drill sharpening stands. It will work much better than the Drill doctor. And in 5 or 10 years it will still work just as well.

BTW, drill doctor co didn't bother to reply to my inquiries. I guess they already have my money......</font>
I purchased a used 750 and it did the same thing. They litterally bent over backwords to help me fix the problem. I called their 800 number and they were very helpful. Hope you can resolve the problem. The little machines do an admirable job on most drills if I can set it up properly. Good Luck and God Bless...

C. Tate
09-16-2003, 11:07 PM
Oso is right. It is a POS machine. I bought to touch up slightly dull drills it does not even do light work very well. Makes a great door stop/paper wieght. Learn to sharpen off hand with drill point gage you will get much better results. Take new drill and and grind old drill till it looks like the new one. It takes practice and if you have good hand eye coordination and pay attention to the detail it works great. Plus you can alter drills to suit different needs.

Oso
09-16-2003, 11:17 PM
It ain't heavy enough for a doorstop, and the cord gets in the way................


Maybe I oughtta call them, I hate stuff that don't work right when it should.

ZINOM
09-16-2003, 11:31 PM
Thank you all so much....plenty of food for thought.

Any other input is welcome!

John

wierdscience
09-16-2003, 11:40 PM
While we'er on the subject,has anybody had fun with the Darex units?

I have also seen lots of big and small machines for 1/4"and up drills but not many for the 1/4" and less sizes,I can freehand everything from 1/4"on up,but man those little suckers are a pita,plus it don't help having hands the size of ball mitts http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

jfsmith
09-17-2003, 01:06 PM
I have a Drill Doc and it does the job for me. When I bought mine, I go the case and an extra wheel for it on sale.

I use and abuse many drill bits in my shop don't buy many because of the Drill Doc.


Jerry

Arbo
09-17-2003, 01:31 PM
Several years ago, an old Navy machinist taught me to freehand drill bits. Since then, I tore the jig off of a $700.00 bit sharpener and threw it in the trash. I have been freehanding everything form 1/16 to 1 1/8 ever since. If you can find somebody to teach you the art, you'll never go back to a jig machine.

Thrud
09-18-2003, 12:40 AM
John
If you want a well made drill sharpener that can properly sharpen drill then save up for the Darex M-5. An excellent unit.

However, KBC, Travers, J&L Industrial and countless others sell drill sharpening guides in 118* and 135. Starrett makes a nice one for 118* only (the pinheads should have the 135* 90*, and other "common" angles available too).

Learn to do it my hand - it is a great way to get rid of that 5Gal. bucket of drills you have sitting on the floor waiting to get their turn at the grinder. The money you save on the dill doctor will buy you two really nice Norton SG wheels to do the drill bits on!

Oso
09-18-2003, 12:50 AM
Zinom.....the drill drs that are the better ones do either 118 or 135, and will split points (all of this is allegedly true).

The cheapo ones at home Depot use a cheezy abrasive, and are not worth a "daggone".

If you want to try your luck, get a 500, you can upgrade to the ability to do 3/4 inch if you decide you like it. Some seem to.

But wait a while before you decide. I liked mine fine for about 30 drillbits. Then it went south.

Joel
09-18-2003, 02:04 AM
If I am not mistaken Oso, the diamond wheel is reversible. They also recommend cleaning the crud out of the chuck every 25 sharpenings. Maybe you can get another 30 or so out of it.

darryl
09-18-2003, 02:47 AM
Sharpened a 1/32 bit the other day, freehand, took all of 5 seconds to do it, and went at some stainless steel. Cut like butter, sort of. It doesn't happen that way very often, though, it usually takes multiple passes to get the lips the same, and the relief angles right, specially for those small bits. It seems everybody has a slightly different way of freehand sharpening that works for them. What worked for me was to read lots about how to sharpen bits, then do it my way anyway. Without a doubt now, the most used tool in my shop is the homemade drum sander, which I use to sharpen bits as well as almost anything else that needs an edge, or needs the edge taken off.

Oso
09-18-2003, 09:05 AM
Joel, dirt cannot make the rake be backwards.....

I cleaned it out regularly, and the wheel is visibly perfect.

Something in the POS has shifted, I assume.

tenfingers
09-18-2003, 03:24 PM
I had problems with the Drill Doctor's "high heel," mentioned by Oso, right off the bat. I think that the pinchers in the front are supposed to align the heel with the mark on the chuck (memory might be failing here), but in my case it didn't. I think it depends on the drill spiral -- fast or slow. When I eyeballed the alignment, I got better results.

I spent so much time studying the drill point during all of my monkeying around that I decided to just learn to do the whole thing by hand. I bought a Starret drill gage and with some practice can now grind a not-so-great but workable drill.

-Al

spkrman15
09-18-2003, 04:52 PM
Hey folks,

I have a drill doctor and i love it. I have had the same problems you have all mentioned and this is what i found. Different drills are grabed difernt ways by the pinchers. I don't know what they are called but the bits that have have an extra rake the whole length of the flute are buggers.

The chuck also has to be tightened and turned back about 1/16 of a turn. Puts the chuck and bit back in alignment.

When these tricks failed me it was the diamond wheel. Bought a new one and away i go. Now i rough the bits out and finish them on the drill doctor. Cheapest and best way for me.

Good luck
Spkrman15

Artpro
09-18-2003, 05:13 PM
My Drill Doctor gave me fits until I watched the video 2-3 times. 1) The chuck must be pushed in all the way and the bit pushed in all the way while aligning the flutes in the sheet metal alignment jaws. Turn the bit so that the jaws are parallel (exactly opposite each other), then tighten the collet.
2) Make sure to have the angle setting the same on the 2 stations. 3) Push downward a little while turning the chuck and bit in the grinding station. It should make a convoluted move while you turn it. I've also discovered that I sometimes have to bark off a bit of the drill point before placing it in the aligment station, in order to clean up the whole cutting edges, especially on larger bits. 4) I hope I haven't totally confused anyone.

Pete Michaud
09-18-2003, 09:57 PM
I have the DD250, and have used the DD500. The 250 has a chuck with quite different, deeper contours than the 500. It will produce a factory-like point with plenty of heel relief. But the 500 *always* (for me, anyway) grinds a point with little heel relief---which always requires the split-point grind to make useful.

ZINOM
09-27-2003, 09:53 AM
After careful consideration, I ended up buying the 250 model....the low-end one, and so far I've only sharpened a couple 9/64, and 11/64, but it worked great.

I tried it the first night and got a hollow grind (I dont know the proper terms) on the face that should be 188*....then I watched the video and corrected my hand speed and technique and got far better results.

There was a time when I wouldn't have thought twice about throwing the money away on the high-end model, and not caring if it worked or not....but those times have passed and I thank all who took the time to reply!

John

wato
09-27-2003, 10:03 AM
Artpro.
Seems to me that if I had to go through all of that to grind a drill bit I'm glad I can free hand as you can probably do two bits in the time it takes to set one up. Think its worth while to burn up a few bits practicing to free hand grind them.
Cheers Ian.

GregR
09-29-2003, 09:22 AM
I recently got the 750 model. I had a lot of drill bits that needed sharpening. So far the bits that I have used after sharpening are drilling better than when they were new; especially my 5/8" and 3/4" bits. I am happy with the unit. I wish it would sharpen my 7/8" and 1" bits since the factory grind is off.

On larger bits, I found that it is best to sharpen and then reset the bit in the collet and sharpen again. For the little drill bits, I used the technique where you look at the bit from the back after tightening and back off to make the collet "teeth" squared up.

Greg