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Braindead
10-09-2009, 10:52 AM
If there are any artist or astronomy types here that still use 35 mm. film, give me a shout. I have some mint condition equipment that I will was going to put up on FleaBay, but will donate to them instead if interested.

Thanks.

lunkenheimer
10-09-2009, 11:08 AM
Or should I PM?
I'm pretty much set but a colleague's daughter is going to take some photography classes and part of it is using film not digital.

Falcon67
10-09-2009, 11:56 AM
Or should I PM?
I'm pretty much set but a colleague's daughter is going to take some photography classes and part of it is using film not digital.

My q would be "why". There are certainly still applications for flim, but you can do so much more with digital - faster, quicker, etc. the more pictures you take, the more you learn. 36 shot roll vs 400+ shot 2G chip. There is no way we could do our extensive drag strip photos and web work with a film camera. We've shot as much as 1000 pictures on a single race weekend. You can also be as creative as you like, without darkrooms or chemicals.

Firefly
10-09-2009, 12:07 PM
My q would be "why".

Because film has better tones to it, especially if done in B/W. And, there's something to be said for the learning process of making sure you get it right before the shutter is pressed as opposed to just deleting it and trying again. Having said that, Ansel Adams himself would have embraced digital and ran with it if he'd lived long enough. Besides, some people enjoy the process. Kinda like why people restore older cars instead of buying a new one.

And this is coming from a person that shoots 100% digital. Granted, if I could just get my hands on some medium format equipment for a decent price....

Braindead
10-09-2009, 12:07 PM
Or should I PM?
I'm pretty much set but a colleague's daughter is going to take some photography classes and part of it is using film not digital.

I have the following available:
Mint Minolta Maxxum 7000 Af with 28mm AF and 75-300mm AF lenses.

Mint Nikon FE Blackbody with 55mm and 28-85 Nikor lenses.

Misc. gear bags, flashes, release cable, etc.

I'd be willing to donate them to a good cause. I would prefer an adult who would get extended use out of them, but perhaps she could be a star by hooking me up with her instructor to donate them to her class. Or, maybe the Minolta for her and the Nikon for the class. I'd hate to think they'd be used briefly and then sit on another shelf like mine. The FE is still sought after by those few still using film, though no longer worth a lot.

PM me and we can discuss it.

johnl
10-09-2009, 12:23 PM
Firefly

""And this is coming from a person that shoots 100% digital. Granted, if I could just get my hands on some medium format equipment for a decent price....""


What do you consider a decent price?? Would a couple of Bronica SQs interest you?
John L

lunkenheimer
10-09-2009, 12:52 PM
Actually, the Nikon stuff sounds like it would work well with my cameras (N70 and D90) so I'm interested in that.

I'll check whether the Minolta meets the specs of the class (apparently there has to be certain features supported, I think pure manual operation etc.)

Thanks

RTPBurnsville
10-09-2009, 01:42 PM
I would be interested if the other guys pass.... I have a few older 35mm cameras but not any additional lenses. I like 35mm very much for printed photos. Sounds like nice stuff you have.

Thanks,
Robert

Firefly
10-09-2009, 02:01 PM
What do you consider a decent price?? Would a couple of Bronica SQs interest you?

PM sent...

johnl
10-09-2009, 02:24 PM
Firefly
One SQ one SQA
John L

Ron of Va
10-09-2009, 02:45 PM
I learned photography on a Speed Graphic. It had a 4X5 format using flashbulbs and black and white film.
You young'uns probably never heard of it. :D
Unfortunately I am not sure I still remember how to use one. I switched to 35mm in the 1970’s. Then on to digital around 1995. I hardly take any pictures anymore. It is a dying art. I admire anyone who still uses 35mm it is a great format. I won’t be surprised if one day they stop making 35mm film.

Firefly
10-09-2009, 04:15 PM
I won’t be surprised if one day they stop making 35mm film.

That day is long off, IMHO solely due to that they still make 120 and 220 film. If film was going to die, they'd kill that, too. There's still a place for it, just not as big of a place as it used to be. If it dies, it's due to the economy, not lack of demand for it.

Just moved to AZ from Tidewater where I grew up. Nice to see a friendly Virginian face, so to speak.

tdkkart
10-09-2009, 07:02 PM
What is this "film" that you speak of??


Actually, one of the older gals at work just brought in some pics she had just taken of her new 3 seasons porch, taken on Polaroid instant film.

Wow, the crap we used to put up with when we didn't know any better.......

Braindead
10-09-2009, 07:27 PM
Excellent to see that someone can make some use of them. I've been intending to FleaBay them for quite some time, but thought someone here might still value them instead. Obviously I went digital.

I'll pick through the PMs on a first come basis, and post when they're gone.

Fyi, I indicated that the Minolta was mint. I bought it to take aerial photos for my S2B, placed it on the lower wing while pre-flighting, and then forgot about it until airborne :mad: The bottom line is that it dropped about 18" onto the ramp when I started up. It dinged the top of the housing, but it continued to function fine until I retired it. It's such a minor ding that I didn't even notice it when I pulled them from storage. I had forgotten about that incident, but...truth in advertising, yada, yada, yada. (Sienfeld sp?)

They both have been stored battery free and with desicant for years.

They were second-tier top of the line in their day: fully manual, AP, and SP. The Minolta is AF, for wing mounting outside the aircraft, back when that was really something :)

Evan
10-09-2009, 07:45 PM
Because film has better tones to it, especially if done in B/W.

That entirely depends on the sensor chip and how the camera software deals with the output. I have a Nikon 4300 that has probably the best CCD sensor that has been made. The dynamic range and the lack of noise is remarkable as is the very high sensitivity and complete lack of variation between pixels and rows of pixels. It's a 4.3 megapixel camera but takes some of the best images of all my cameras. In black and white mode it uses all 12 megapixels and corrects each colour to compensate for the filter. Then it combines each result to produce the actual luminance value for each triad to make the pixel. Most cameras just take a regular colour image and desaturate it. That is much inferior to the way my Nikon operates.

Here is an example:

http://ixian.ca/pics6/dougbw.jpg

bruto
10-09-2009, 09:21 PM
My wife and I both shoot film still, because....well, we like it. Mostly slides because...well, there's nothing like a slide. We like them, and we do what we like, rather than what someone thinks we should. Argue all you want, we're working through a freezer full of Velvia, as long as there's a processor to develop it.

Anyway, we're pretty well fixed, and don't need the stuff mentioned here, so I hope it finds a good home.

The Nikon manual lenses of that vintage will work with some Nikon digital SLR's but will not meter correctly with many current ones. Here's a link that gives a chart of what fits what in the Nikon world:

http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/compatibility-lens.htm

I should mention that as far as I know, the Sony digital SLR's that are the successor to Minolta may still accommodate those Maxxum lenses. If so, they might be a good bet even if the Maxxum 7000 gets set aside. That was a good camera with excellent exposure control (we have one of these too), but slow auto focus with a hunger for batteries whe AF is on. With slow zoom lenses it hunts for focus and you have to center it on a clear vertical edge or line to make it stop. It should work fine with the wide angle lens, which is much easier to focus. If you consider it as a manual focus camera with occasional auto focus for action, it's a very good camera, and Minolta lenses are usually quite nice.

The Nikon FE would be an ideal camera for a film student in one of those "bondage and discipline" film courses where they want everything manual. Some people are convinced that older Nikon meters are calibrated to work best with black and white film, and old wives' tale or not, that one will burn up Tri X like a pro. The Minolta works just as well manually, but it's never as convenient to meter manually with a camera that was so well designed for automation. It's a whiz in auto exposure mode, but all its controls are push buttons, rather than dials, making manual setting a bit slow.

aostling
10-09-2009, 09:53 PM
I have the following available:
Mint Minolta Maxxum 7000 Af with 28mm AF and 75-300mm AF lenses.


The Maxxum lenses can be used directly on the Sony digital SLRs. Since the debut of the full-frame Sony A850 these lenses would undoubtedly sell on eBay for a fair price.

Your Old Dog
10-09-2009, 10:26 PM
My q would be "why".

Lab Fees. Some schools make you buy so much film from the school as part of the lab fee. The film is obviously over priced. Nothing wrong with learning the basics on film. It's easier to teach for another reason. I taught photography in the practicums at Niagara University. (more political of a job then my Union Presidency of NABET Local 25 in Buffalo!!)

BTW, "IF" you can get a local school to accept the gear as a donation you can get a serious tax deduction from it. Not replacement cost but full value if Im remembering it correctly. It caused local TV stations in Buffalo to beg us to take their old stuff and we had to refuse most of it.

rantbot
10-09-2009, 11:39 PM
Some people are convinced that older Nikon meters are calibrated to work best with black and white film
As long as they keep running. Nikon durability is vastly overrated, and company support for old products is not particularly good, either. Which is why someone like me is interested in things like old FEs - I need to salvage fiddly little parts to keep my not-quite-so-old FE2 churning along.

Braindead
10-10-2009, 01:23 AM
The Maxxum lenses can be used directly on the Sony digital SLRs. Since the debut of the full-frame Sony A850 these lenses would undoubtedly sell on eBay for a fair price.

Thats very interesting.

Also, I considered the tax-deduction angle.

However, I've made a comittment here, and someone who has expressed an interest will get them. I'll even pay shipping :)

I have, however, over the years collected 6-8 Apple II plus 8-bit machines, along with 10-11 IOpeners, set aside for various hobbyist electronics projects. I may see if I can find a local high school digital lab that might like to have them for the deduction.

Falcon67
10-10-2009, 03:13 AM
I don't personally have a problem with film. I have a big box of Pentax stuff around here somewhere. Useless IMHO. I would just think that for learning, you get immediate feedback on your composition, light, exposure, etc from shooting digital. A good Canon or Nikon will shoot just about anything. Dump it to disk and review. Like to shoot B&W? one click converts, then play with the levels to get the effect you like. Same for Sepia. We still have some issues at night - $800 worth of flash handles that. The new Nikon that the folks at Extreme (drag photos at the finals) were using can go to 4000 ISO without blowing up the pic with a lot of noise.

I like slides too - used to shoot everything in slides.

We let the camera save the shots in jpg because we haven't got the extra time to mess with RAW. 8mp and a 12 mp make pretty good 13x19" prints. We sell a lot of 'em. Plus I can integrate the shots right into posters, flyers, etc. Learning I suppose work with either format.

I'll have to ask the chair of the art department here if they use any film at all and if so, why. I 'll look in the course catalog, but I think photo stuff is all digital. Interesting discussion.

Evan
10-10-2009, 04:33 AM
I used to shoot slides too. Many rolls of Kodachrome have been run through my cameras. Now they are sitting collecting dust because of all the hassles involved and the expense of shooting film. I jumped on digital from the very earliest cameras that took cartoon pictures and now have 5 decent digital cameras including two DSLRs.

There are only 8 Kodachrome labs left in the world. It won't be long and there will be none. A good friend of ours used to have a photo lab here in town. He was put out of business when Kodak stopped making the developer he needed for his automatic processors that developed the film. They switched to a new developer that required 1/4 the time and there was no way to effectively change the operation of his machines to accommodate it.

Film will go away, it already is dead in many fields. Film is long gone in astronomy, news gathering and most professional photography. My daughter is a pro photographer and she buys a new camera every year because she shoots enough images each year to wear out the shutter on a DSLR. That's 50 to 100,000 images.

The latest camera she bought is the 5D MKII from Canon, $5000. 21 megapixel. That's higher resolution than 35mm film. It's disposable along with all the rest she has and will be replaced next year. Now she owns a newspaper and it is 100% digital, no film at any stage.

Digital is even taking over the last bastion of film, large format extreme resolution photography. 100 megapixels sensors are now available. It won't be long and film will be a very expensive hobby only item.

Anybody want a few rolls of Fuji Superia 1600 full spectrum film? I still have some vacuum bagged and frozen solid in the bottom of my freezer somewhere.

steve45
10-10-2009, 10:16 AM
I've got a Mamiya 645 film system, with lenses ranging from 55mm to 500mm. How I wish I could convert it to digital! I saw a digital back for it some years ago, but the resolution wasn't that good, and the cost was $15,000!