PDA

View Full Version : Random workshop picture thread



.RC.
10-18-2009, 04:49 AM
Here is a thread you can post a random picture taken in your workshop..

Here is mine....A TC grinder set up to sharpen a slitting saw.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v606/OzRinger/tcgrinder001.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v606/OzRinger/tcgrinder002.jpg

jeepnxj96
10-18-2009, 10:04 AM
My bandsaw sawing some structual for bumpers. 1st cut it made after purchasing it

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t238/jeepnxj96/jeep%20fab/100_1172_0001.jpg
http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t238/jeepnxj96/jeep%20fab/100_1176_0001.jpg

Lew Hartswick
10-18-2009, 11:17 AM
You didn't even clean it up before using it. :-)
...lew...

Frank Ford
10-18-2009, 12:26 PM
My first and most important tool - carried daily for 58 years now:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/ShopTips/005.jpg

Ok, like Lassie, there have been successors, so this isn't really the first - that one got lost at a beach keg party in Santa Barbara, 1963.

One of my newest - an hour meter on the shop light circuit:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Shop/FFShop/hourmeter.jpg

It now reads around 530, indicating that I spend about 20 hours a week there.

From the kitchen to the shop:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/ShopTips/205.jpg

Where workbench space really comes from:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/ShopTips/260.jpg

Roy Andrews
10-18-2009, 12:31 PM
Here is a thread you can post a random picture taken in your workshop..

Here is mine....A TC grinder set up to sharpen a slitting saw.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v606/OzRinger/tcgrinder001.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v606/OzRinger/tcgrinder002.jpg


love the faux paint job to look like cracked stone! very creative.

Roy Andrews
10-18-2009, 12:48 PM
the grandson leading me through the wood shop to show me what he has been working on with his pry bar. now there are only one of the pair of end tables i have been working on. he was making fire wood for grandma.
http://i460.photobucket.com/albums/qq329/joshuaz223/013.jpg
my #1 hobby
http://i460.photobucket.com/albums/qq329/joshuaz223/lakeplacid045.jpg
needed a piece of plate for a project in a hurry. can u guess where it came from?
http://i460.photobucket.com/albums/qq329/joshuaz223/trunk%20mount/trunkmount002.jpg

FabRight
10-18-2009, 01:14 PM
Not at home shop, but the owner is nice enough to let me work on my own stuff after hours.
Before paint
http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/vv51/mjs1320/P9250046.jpg
Getting a little more organized
http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/vv51/mjs1320/P9250047.jpg

Mcruff
10-18-2009, 01:26 PM
Cutting some 20 tooth change gears for the South Bend 9"-10K lathes.
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y233/mcruff/Southbend%20lathe/gearcut0002.jpg

pipeclay
10-18-2009, 05:51 PM
Cutting 127 tooth

pipeclay
10-18-2009, 05:51 PM
Cutting 127

aboard_epsilon
10-18-2009, 06:15 PM
love the faux paint job to look like cracked stone! very creative.

yeah, he should paint over the "C" :)

all the best.markj

Doc Nickel
10-18-2009, 06:15 PM
http://www.docsmachine.com/machineshop/dark-shop.jpg

Doc.

Timleech
10-18-2009, 07:25 PM
Facing up some fabricated marine engine mounting feet. These are someone's homebrew effort done some years ago, good solid fabrications but because they weren't machined after welding nothing was flat and eventually all the studs holding them to the sides of the crankcase had sheared.

One of the feet upside down in the mill, facing the bottom mounting face:-

http://i559.photobucket.com/albums/ss38/Timleech_2009/RNmount-5.jpg

The top corner should register against a narrow lip on the side of the crankcase. It didn't, I had to build up the corner with weld and reface it:-

http://i559.photobucket.com/albums/ss38/Timleech_2009/RNmount-3.jpg

Then the face which bolts to the side of the crankcase had to be done:-

http://i559.photobucket.com/albums/ss38/Timleech_2009/RNmount-4.jpg

All done without disturbing the setup on the mill table.

Finally some new double-ended studs in 5/8" Whitworth had to be made up:-

http://i559.photobucket.com/albums/ss38/Timleech_2009/RNmount-6.jpg


Tim

Walter
10-18-2009, 08:24 PM
Muffler furnace. We use it for D2 forging and also some heat treating.
http://pic100.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/22626082/376177328.jpg

http://pic100.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/22626082/376177225.jpg

clutch
10-18-2009, 09:03 PM
My first and most important tool - carried daily for 58 years now:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/ShopTips/005.jpg

Ok, like Lassie, there have been successors, so this isn't really the first - that one got lost at a beach keg party in Santa Barbara, 1963.



I have a Swiss Army knife, a Wenger, that my brother bought for me years ago when he was touring Europe. I used to carry it everywhere but after almost loosing it once, I only use it around the house.




One of my newest - an hour meter on the shop light circuit:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Shop/FFShop/hourmeter.jpg

It now reads around 530, indicating that I spend about 20 hours a week there.

I am building (almost done) a heavily insulated room inside my garage that has my lathe and mill in it. I will be heating it electrically since I heat the house with propane and the costs are fairly equivalant.

Since there doesn't seem to be a 240 kill-a-watt, I need a way to tell how much the heat is costing me. I live in Northern Michigan and it gets cold and stays cold.

A hour meter would work if I tie it into the line voltage thermostat and then do the math running my 1500 W baseboard heater. You gave me just the solution I needed.

Where did you get your meter?

Clutch

halac
10-19-2009, 12:46 AM
I have a Swiss Army knife, a Wenger, that my brother bought for me years ago when he was touring Europe. I used to carry it everywhere but after almost loosing it once, I only use it around the house.



I am building (almost done) a heavily insulated room inside my garage that has my lathe and mill in it. I will be heating it electrically since I heat the house with propane and the costs are fairly equivalant.

Since there doesn't seem to be a 240 kill-a-watt, I need a way to tell how much the heat is costing me. I live in Northern Michigan and it gets cold and stays cold.

A hour meter would work if I tie it into the line voltage thermostat and then do the math running my 1500 W baseboard heater. You gave me just the solution I needed.

Where did you get your meter?

Clutch

This will give you a general idea to figure out how many BTU's it will take to heat your shop.

http://www.heatershop.com/btu_calculator.htm

Carld
10-19-2009, 09:49 AM
Hey Timleech, I like your set up for the geometric head using the tool post. I have some ideas on how I would set it up and use it but tell us how YOU do it. I would prefer to use the tailstock but have considered using the tool post as you do.

barts
10-19-2009, 12:32 PM
Line boring the piston valve in an antique engine for our 19' steam launch:

http://i564.photobucket.com/albums/ss85/KernelSander/DSC_7991.jpg

Timleech
10-19-2009, 04:51 PM
Hey Timleech, I like your set up for the geometric head using the tool post. I have some ideas on how I would set it up and use it but tell us how YOU do it. I would prefer to use the tailstock but have considered using the tool post as you do.

Not sure which bit of the 'setup' you're asking about?
The head (actually a Coventry head, but same difference) is mounted into a bit of bar welded onto a home-made toolholder and bored to suit the shank. The one in the pic is a 3/4" diehead. I've got a 1/2" diehead which has a 1" shank mounts into a special holder the other way round, ie it's parallel with the main axis of the holder, the holder is extra deep and has a 1" bore instead of the usual rectangular slot.
As for setting height and transverse position, I usually just eyeball it carefully. Close the diebox, either offer it up to the work which will generally have a bit of chamfer on the end, or bring it in the open position over the work and close the box up & watch how it sits around the job. Of course the height should only need setting once.

I went to a lot of trouble with a previous lathe setting up an indexed position for the cross slide but most dieboxes have a bit of flexibility built in so super-precision isn't essential. If you need a super-precise thread maybe you'll need to devise something more exact.

My big lathe has a 'power drilling' bracket on the cross-slide which does index to the spindle axis, and is permanently on centre height, so that's ideal for holding dieboxes.

Tim

I wouldn't fancy using the tailstock unless you have a lever-operated job, keeping up with the thread at any sort of reasonable speed would be a nightmare.

Carld
10-19-2009, 04:58 PM
Ok, I understand that now about the carriage. You would have to manually feed the carriage as the die head cut the thread and manually stop it with a carriage stop or by hand. Or, you could set the thread your cutting on the quick change gear box and let the lathe feed it and release the half nuts when you get where you want it.

There is no way the die head will pull the carriage without kicking the head out.

Which do you do?

camdigger
10-19-2009, 05:13 PM
Some random shop pics...

Something I inherited from my Dad

http://i766.photobucket.com/albums/xx301/camdigger/lathes.jpg


Dealing with welding distortion on a weldment

http://i766.photobucket.com/albums/xx301/camdigger/PA181333.jpg

Timleech
10-19-2009, 05:33 PM
Ok, I understand that now about the carriage. You would have to manually feed the carriage as the die head cut the thread and manually stop it with a carriage stop or by hand. Or, you could set the thread your cutting on the quick change gear box and let the lathe feed it and release the half nuts when you get where you want it.

There is no way the die head will pull the carriage without kicking the head out.

Which do you do?

Feed by hand.
Depending on the model of diehead, you can watch it's position relative to the shank. Some of them have a visible amount of travel between the 'rest' position and 'release' position, the aim is to keep it midway between the two.
A bed stop can be handy to set the point of release if you're doing a batch of parts, otherwise just stopping the carriage manually at the right point will do the job.

Tim

madman
10-20-2009, 09:23 PM
Wish I could post Pictures

bollie7
10-20-2009, 11:05 PM
love the faux paint job to look like cracked stone! very creative.
The machine might spent most of its life in a Government place where a common make work for apprentices was repainting the machines. Rarely with the old paint taken off first.
R.C. do you know the history of the macson T&C?

bollie7

HSS
10-20-2009, 11:20 PM
The gearbox on my southbend lathe has a worn fit on one end of the gearshaft and I am going to line bore it and bush it. I could not get the other gear shaft nut loose because of the tight location and I didn't want to mill down my good 29mm combination wrench so my wife suggested I make a hammer wrench out of some 3/8 plate.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii285/goochiepepper/DSC00414.jpg

This is the nut on the right end of the geartrain and the wrench worked like a charm.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii285/goochiepepper/DSC00416.jpg

This is the work table I use 90% of the time and it hardly ever gets cleaned off. That is my air compressor pump on the blocks needing a ring job on one cylinder. The next pump I get won't be an oilless. Too dadgum noisey.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii285/goochiepepper/DSC00418.jpg

And a shot of the toolboxes and some of the shop.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii285/goochiepepper/DSC00419.jpg

snowman
10-20-2009, 11:46 PM
http://i559.photobucket.com/albums/ss38/Timleech_2009/RNmount-3.jpg
Wowsa...had I done any milling with the quill so far extended at my last machining job I would have caught a 2x4 upside the head by the model shop supervisor!

KiddZimaHater
10-21-2009, 12:01 AM
Wowsa...had I done any milling with the quill so far extended at my last machining job I would have caught a 2x4 upside the head by the model shop supervisor!
Yeah, I was thinking the same thing.
Poor Quill... :(

Jim Shaper
10-21-2009, 02:20 AM
so my wife suggested I make a hammer wrench out of some 3/8 plate.

Wow, you got a good one!

Mine just tries to keep up with what I'm doing. :)

macona
10-21-2009, 02:26 AM
http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h228/macona/DSC03377.jpg

http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h228/macona/DSC03380.jpg

Timleech
10-21-2009, 04:39 AM
Wowsa...had I done any milling with the quill so far extended at my last machining job I would have caught a 2x4 upside the head by the model shop supervisor!

OK then, how would you have done the job ;)?
Bear in mind it was only skimming off the surplus weld, no heavy cuts, not stressing the machine in any serious way.

Tim

HSS
10-21-2009, 08:45 AM
Wow, you got a good one!

Mine just tries to keep up with what I'm doing. :)

You got that right, Jim, she works with and around machinists all day and I don't, so she enlightens me on some of their methods. She has a Clausing in her shop, but as far as I can remember (which ain't very far):D , she has never run my machine.

Patrick

snowman
10-21-2009, 09:07 AM
OK then, how would you have done the job ;)?
Bear in mind it was only skimming off the surplus weld, no heavy cuts, not stressing the machine in any serious way.

Tim

Does that machine not have enough vertical table travel to lift all the way up so you can mill without extending the quill?

What was your reasoning for cleaning up the surplus weld that way, then switching over to finishing that face with the big cutter in the later picture?

Timleech
10-21-2009, 09:28 AM
Does that machine not have enough vertical table travel to lift all the way up so you can mill without extending the quill?

No. Ok, maybe the table could have gone up another inch or so, but that's about it. I quite often have to extend the quill for jobs clamped direct to the table, for vice work it's usually not an issue. Note that the cutter in the pic is below table level.



What was your reasoning for cleaning up the surplus weld that way, then switching over to finishing that face with the big cutter in the later picture?

Simply that it was the weld underneath the fabrication being cleaned up, the shell mill was doing the face.

Tim

snowman
10-21-2009, 09:49 AM
I see!

Actually, I didn't see, and that was the reason. I initially thought that was a "bridgeport".

So in that machines case, is the quill more beefy so that it can handle the side loads of milling while extended?

John Stevenson
10-21-2009, 02:31 PM
"Everthing " is more beefier than a Bridgeport......................

.

kz1000
10-21-2009, 07:26 PM
Boss 4 Mill was sitting for years. Retro-fitted with mach3.
http://i790.photobucket.com/albums/yy188/accrofish/Mill2enhanced.jpg
First parts in fourteen years.
http://i790.photobucket.com/albums/yy188/accrofish/smallshaper025.jpg
I welded a tab on the end to match the nut. Worked perfect!
http://i790.photobucket.com/albums/yy188/accrofish/cropedwrenches.jpg

Carld
10-21-2009, 08:54 PM
Geez macona, you got any room in there to work?:eek:

BobWarfield
10-22-2009, 12:43 AM
An organizer my brother and I whipped up one afternoon over a couple 6 packs:

http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/Workshop/P4023903.JPG

I could use about 4 more of 'em!

My happy little lathe:

http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/Workshop/P4023898.JPG

(and tiny CNC friend)

And the bigger CNC:

http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/MillStuff/CNC/P1011029.JPG

More feeble attempts to organize:

http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/MillStuff/CNC/R8Rack/P1011474.jpg

LOL, it's my red to Alistair's green for shop color schemes!

Cheers,

BW

hornluv
10-22-2009, 12:48 AM
Hey Bob,

I like the pen cups with the wrenches and calipers. Overall, your little plastic organizer is pretty dern slick.

Stuart

KiddZimaHater
10-22-2009, 01:17 AM
Here's my 1-car garage sized shop, with mill, surface grinder, workbench, and lathe hiding behind said workbench..... as clean as it will ever be.:D
.
http://img43.imageshack.us/img43/7867/shopclean.jpg

gary hart
10-22-2009, 01:54 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/ghart3/Childs%200000%20mill/ChildswithStuarttriple.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/ghart3/Childs%200000%20mill/withHolbrook.jpg

.RC.
10-22-2009, 02:22 AM
The machine might spent most of its life in a Government place where a common make work for apprentices was repainting the machines. Rarely with the old paint taken off first.
R.C. do you know the history of the macson T&C?

bollie7

No nothing other then it is a WW2 vintage machine...

I cannot even find a serial number on it.

macona
10-22-2009, 04:50 AM
Geez macona, you got any room in there to work?:eek:

Work, nah... Im allergic to it.

My dad says I dont have to worry about tripping and falling and hurting myself. Something in there will keep me upright! :D

There is more space in there now that I have moved some of it to TechShop. I just hope things work out in the long run as I have more stuff now and dont know if I can fit it in my garage.

kc5ezc
10-22-2009, 04:18 PM
Bob Warfield: Please tell us a little more about the small cnc friend you have sitting there.

dharnell
10-22-2009, 09:37 PM
Gary Hart,

That's an interesting lathe and chuck in the background. The chuck appears to have two sets of pinions for tightening. Do you have other pictures/information of the lathe or chuck?

Dave

Robin R
10-22-2009, 10:10 PM
Gary Harts lathe is a Holbrook CB8, certainly a rare item in the US and very desirable. This is Tony's write up on the B8, but there are a couple of pictures of the CB8 at the bottom, you can see there are a lot of similarities. http://www.lathes.co.uk/holbrook/page5.html

BobWarfield
10-22-2009, 11:46 PM
Bob Warfield: Please tell us a little more about the small cnc friend you have sitting there.

http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCCNCMiniRouter.html

It was one of the first of Widgitmaster's handmade CNC routers. So cute, I had to have one. He sells on eBay, though less often than he used to. It's a lot of work, but they come out really gorgeous. I had the idea I'd take around and show it to get folks interested in CNC, so I made it portable. The electronics are in a toolbox. Never got around to taking it anywhere though.

Evan
10-23-2009, 12:40 AM
This is possibly the most difficult item I have designed. Almost no two pieces are the same dimensions or have the same angle of cut on the ends.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics2/spiralsc1.jpg

This is what it turned out like, not including the handrail which was installed shortly after this picture.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics2/sstair2.jpg


This is what shapers are good for. It's aluminum bronze and harder than the hobs of Hell. Nothing else I have could make this cut. Even the shaper complained. Took over an hour to get through. Broke the tooling twice. This plate is nearly 2" thick and was in long service as a wear plate on a giant open pit mine shovel. It has been beaten for thousands of hours by the cable drum.

http://ixian.ca/pics6/bronzecut.jpg

gary hart
10-23-2009, 02:16 AM
Dave, Robin ID the lathe, it is a Holbrook CB 8. There is 3 places for keys. First set is for the D1-2 chuck mount, the second for adjusting the chuck to run true and the the third for operating the chuck.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/ghart3/Holbrook/Holbrook.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/ghart3/Holbrook/Holbrookadv1.jpg

Doc Nickel
10-23-2009, 06:13 AM
Now that is a nice little lathe.

Anyway, random workshop pic. :D

http://www.docsmachine.com/blacksmith/docs-smithy.jpg

Doc.

clutch
10-23-2009, 08:17 PM
The gearbox on my southbend lathe has a worn fit on one end of the gearshaft and I am going to line bore it and bush it. I could not get the other gear shaft nut loose because of the tight location and I didn't want to mill down my good 29mm combination wrench so my wife suggested I make a hammer wrench out of some 3/8 plate.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii285/goochiepepper/DSC00414.jpg

The last time I used a (sledge) hammer wrench, I was taking the crown off of a 500 ton hydraulic press.

How does your lady know that term hammer wrench?

Clutch

Bmyers
10-23-2009, 08:24 PM
http://i485.photobucket.com/albums/rr219/j-bmyers/0427090904a.jpg
milling flutes in a tailstock die holder

John Stevenson
10-23-2009, 08:50 PM
At the recent show we were using a KX1 CNC mill to make plasic badges for the foundry guy on site to do brass badges from.

We did loads of 1st prize badges for the exhibits, some loco name plates, door plaques for the granddaughters bedroom doors, few key rings and this to finish off.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/british%20steel.jpg


Waiting for the brass badge to be forwarded as it didn't get cast before the show ended.

.

rockrat
10-23-2009, 09:50 PM
http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/british%20steel.jpg


:eek:
That hurt.

rock~

wirst
10-23-2009, 10:55 PM
I too struggle with an 11' X 19" shop. It's a lot harder to keep organized with a couple of motorcycles in there as well.

Daughter just moved out to college, but for some reason wife won't let me put motorcycles OR machine tools in the now-vacant room...