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jerhalco
10-18-2009, 07:33 PM
Anyone use one of these? Any thoughts as suitable for occasional use? http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40668
TIA
Jerry

JoeLee
10-18-2009, 10:34 PM
You might get a year out of it before it burns up, if you don't use it too much.

JL..................

smiller6912
10-18-2009, 10:46 PM
Should be OK for occasional use. I use mine about 6-10 hours per week and have had it a little over 3 years, I put 6 hours on it today, I like it.

Forrest Addy
10-19-2009, 12:14 AM
I have a buffer very similar with a wire wheel. I work it hard bogging it down to where the starter winding kicks in often many times a week.

True, Asian motors have a reputation for frying but don't stand back and sneer at them as being contemptable cheap stuff. Yeah, I know, you shouldn't have to come up with a remedy for new equipment but if you're buying cheap stuff it's because it's all you can afford. The alternative is to spend $500 to $700 for a Baldor industrial grade machine. So shut up and put a little TLC into the motor or pay the big money.

The motors on cheap Asian powered equipment may die young if you don't look them over as soon as you unbox it. Open the endbells and examine the windings. Are the individual conductors loose and movable or bonded together? Asian motors quite often have the final dip and bake step omitted from the stator's manufacture. The windings are well executed but they have not been immobilized in insulating varnish - thus they are free to vibrate individually from the alternating mag field, chafe the insulation, and short out.

Asian motors can be made reliable with only a little effort and money. Take the stator (or the whole motor) to the motor shop to dip and bake the stator. It's a simple and cheap fix to make a one year buffer into a twenty year buffer.

jerhalco
10-23-2009, 04:46 AM
I have read that you have done that before and had forgotten. Sometimes others forget that occasional part time use in the home shop doesn't justify Baldor level prices.
Thanks again everyone for your answers, I am going to HF today!!!
Jerry

aboard_epsilon
10-23-2009, 07:27 AM
I have a buffer very similar with a wire wheel. I work it hard bogging it down to where the starter winding kicks in often many times a week.

True, Asian motors have a reputation for frying but don't stand back and sneer at them as being contemptable cheap stuff. Yeah, I know, you shouldn't have to come up with a remedy for new equipment but if you're buying cheap stuff it's because it's all you can afford. The alternative is to spend $500 to $700 for a Baldor industrial grade machine. So shut up and put a little TLC into the motor or pay the big money.

The motors on cheap Asian powered equipment may die young if you don't look them over as soon as you unbox it. Open the endbells and examine the windings. Are the individual conductors loose and movable or bonded together? Asian motors quite often have the final dip and bake step omitted from the stator's manufacture. The windings are well executed but they have not been immobilized in insulating varnish - thus they are free to vibrate individually from the alternating mag field, chafe the insulation, and short out.

Asian motors can be made reliable with only a little effort and money. Take the stator (or the whole motor) to the motor shop to dip and bake the stator. It's a simple and cheap fix to make a one year buffer into a twenty year buffer.

you could just paint epoxy glue onto them ..

all thew best.markj

Brett Hurt
10-23-2009, 10:21 AM
I HAVE HAD MINE FOR 15 YEARS WORKS GREAT. i USE IT ALL THE TIME TO POLISH BRASS bRETT