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View Full Version : Early Christmas Tool Gloat, part 1:



Doc Nickel
10-22-2009, 06:29 AM
It's a very busy heavy-iron week here at Doc's Machine, so please pardon me while I gloat a bit. :D

In a wonderful, roundabout stroke of luck, I just got this 5" leg vise and some anvil hardy tools:

http://www.docsmachine.com/blacksmith/5in-leg-vise.jpg

... As well as this unknown-make farriers' pattern 170-lb anvil:

http://www.docsmachine.com/blacksmith/170lb-anvil.jpg

Both vises of this sort and anvils in general are rare and expensive up here. I got both for $120.

The anvil has a pretty badly battered hard face (though I can fix that (http://www.docsmachine.com/fabshop/anviltig.jpg)) but even still, it rings like a church bell. Anybody want to swing a rough guess on the make? Wrought body, hard face, no stamps or markings at all that I can see.

Besides those, from Official PM Awesome Dude Craig Donges, I got (among other things) this 124-lb 11" shaper vise to go on my old 1905 16" Stockbridge shaper:

http://www.docsmachine.com/machineshop/11in-shaper-vise.jpg

In fact, in one swollen foop, I just added six more vises to the shop.

But that's the next gloat.

Doc.

EVguru
10-22-2009, 07:43 AM
Two Anvils!

Now you can indulge in the old tradition of 'Blowing' the anvil.

If you turn your anvil upside down there is usually a square tapered hole in the bottom. Fill the hole with black powder and add a fuse. Place the second anvil on top with the holes matching.

Light fuse and retire to a safe distance.

Do NOT try to catch the anvil:D


I've got a Peter Wright, but mine's rather bigger, about 2 foot long.

The numbers on the side give the weigh in units of hundredweight (cwt, 112 pounds), Stones (st, 14 pounds) and pounds.

rockrat
10-22-2009, 09:45 AM
Nice scores. Your early enough that you can still have a Christmas tool gloat later on.

I have a leg vise on the floor of the shop that I have to get standing. Its just another project that I will get to some day. Or when I have to have it for a different project.

While the anvil is nice, any hardy seems to be hard to come by over here. Auctions and sales rarely have them available. They must be the first things to get misplaced.

rock~

Jim2
10-22-2009, 11:34 AM
Nice score!

I have a farrier's anvil--a 125 pounder that I picked up around 10 years ago, now. I bought it from the son of the original owner. He had used the anvil for many years as a farrier. Even so, he didn't seem to have any idea of what kind it was or anything. All he told me was that he thought it had been mail-ordered from Sweden. Mine has very little in the way of markings on it, so I thought it might be some "generic" anvil.

Anyway I was looking at it one day, and it seemed to have some faint lines on the side. I sanded some of the rust and dirt off the side, and I could tell it definitely had some lettering on there. I took a piece of paper, placed it over the lettering and then ran a pencil back and forth slowly moving from one side of the paper to the other. . . . The word "Trenton" had made itself visible!

Anyway, here's a picture of mine. Yours looks pretty much the same to me, but what I don't know about anvils would fill a book. . . .

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v280/jasch/Blacksmithing/Anvil-1.jpg

Jim

Duffy
10-22-2009, 01:59 PM
Doc, try Diamond Horse shoe and Caulk, somewhere in the midwest. The numbers by the way are hunderweight, Quarters (28 lbs,), not stones (14 lbs,) and pounds. They were also stamped on the barrel of every cannon cast in Britain. Duffy

gwilson
10-22-2009, 02:47 PM
Now you need to find or make the long leafspring that opens the jaws of the leg vise.

Doc Nickel
10-22-2009, 04:56 PM
Now you need to find or make the long leafspring that opens the jaws of the leg vise.

-Yep. I was sorry to see it was missing, but hey, for $20, beggars can't be choosers. :D

I have plenty of old truck leaf springs, and it's about time I learn how to properly temper a simple spring, anyway.


Doc.

EVguru
10-22-2009, 05:51 PM
I have plenty of old truck leaf springs, and it's about time I learn how to properly temper a simple spring, anyway.


Leaf springs are aften made from alloys that suffer from hot shortness, so make sure you re-heat in good time and don't keep hammering on metal that's dropping out of its full plastic zone.

gwilson
10-22-2009, 11:34 PM
There is no telling what auto springs are made from these days. Could be air hardening. You can get 1" X 1/8" annealed spring steel from Dixie Gun Works,or just make it out of O1. Heat to orange,quench,draw to a dark blue. That spring doesn't move a lot to open the vise.

Weston Bye
10-24-2009, 04:08 PM
It's a very busy heavy-iron week here at Doc's Machine, so please pardon me while I gloat a bit. :D

In a wonderful, roundabout stroke of luck, I just got this 5" leg vise and some anvil hardy tools:

http://www.docsmachine.com/blacksmith/5in-leg-vise.jpg


Doc,
your vise is missing parts. Here's what the mounting strap and return spring looks like:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/BlacksmithVise.jpg

It can be the first thing you make on your new anvil.

Doc Nickel
10-24-2009, 05:19 PM
Actually, I do have the mounting pad (the typical "clover leaf" style) with it's strap and clip. I'm missing the wedge to lock it, but that's easy.

They're just not shown in the pic, which was taken while we were still unloading the truck.

Doc.