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View Full Version : Broke ankle and lathe while leveing



Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 06:29 AM
I was raising my new 11 x 26 lathe (~500 lbs) to level it when it fell forward on to me. I was sitting on the floor closer to the headstock end. The chip tray contacted the floor stopping the fall.

Something in around the headstock control panel struck the ankle breaking the tib, fib, and ankle bones. The first surgery in ER left me with a “fixator” screwed into my foot and shin in eight places. I was not pinned under it. The second surgery is scheduled for next week. The fixator goes away and the cast or boot device goes on. Doc said I will not be able to stand / walk on the broken leg for six months. Thank God for pain meds.

The lathe is still down on on the floor. No idea what might be bent or broken.

I have a small paying project that could keep me busy 25 hours per month. Anyone here have experience working from a wheel chair while operating a lathe and table top mill (I am typing while mediciated.......)?

Mcgyver
10-28-2009, 06:36 AM
Ouch! Gary, very sorry to hear that. 6 months, wow, and sorry you got hurt and hope the recovery is quick.

Jim Caudill
10-28-2009, 06:43 AM
Gary, I'm so sorry to hear of your accident. I once jumped off a burning boat (long story) onto pavement and the nevicular bone in my left foot exploded into pieces. Surgery, pins, screws and 3 months in a non-weight bearing cast. Broken bones healing is not automatic: they thought I was going to have to have a second operation to "fuse" the bones in my foot, but thankfull, they finally began to knit. After about 5 weeks, I was able to go to work, walk with crutches, and use an electric scooter to get around. I fell down stairs several times (I live in a tri-level house) and usually would go down by scooting on my butt. You're in for a rough road, but this too will pass.

Please post your location in your profile, or whatever it's called. If we knew where you were, perhaps some member(s) could come over and help with the lathe and any other specialty skill you might need.

on edit: I see you have now updated so we can see you're in Indianoplis, great! That's a little too far for an evening run for me, but if necessary, perhaps a Saturday outing...

My thoughts are with you. Hang in there.

Been there, done that, have the scars and crutches to show for it.

Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 07:03 AM
I ws trying to think through what might go wrong and never considered the (top heavy) lathe would tip over. Duh! I was watching my fingers as I inserted levelers into the base mountng holes concernced about mashing one or more off.

I would welcome any help uprighting the lathe. A portable engine hoist would do it and I have straps already. I am located on the far southside on Indy in Greenwood Indiana.

I should have known better than to try to level the lathe by rasing it from below. Chaulk this mistake up to over eagerness and lack of patience.
(edited for spelling - drugs again)
Thanks

hardtail
10-28-2009, 07:36 AM
While I fortunately have no personal experience operating from a wheelchair, I attended a local auction this spring where the deceased was wheelchair bound, this fella had a fully equipped machine shop with multiple equipment as well as a full welding and fab shop, his work appeared to be excellent and the local steel mill sent him regular business...........the wheelchair didn't seem to hamper his talents.

Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 07:42 AM
Maybe a stool built to the correct height and a foot / leg rest for the broken leg. I am determined to get back in the game.

Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 07:47 AM
Warning last picture is my leg with fixator
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a81/N9ZYE/Justenoughspacetobreakleg.jpg
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a81/N9ZYE/Latherestedonchiptray.jpg
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a81/N9ZYE/100_0439.jpg

EVguru
10-28-2009, 08:17 AM
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a81/N9ZYE/100_0439.jpg

Look at all those nice indicator supports!


That's one hell of a learning experence about COG, but I'm surprised it tipped over quite that easily.

I've heard of quite a few people in wheelchairs with machine shops, but they usually have their machines mounted low. The general rule is that you want the cross-slide handwheel at elbow height. My Harrison is a bit low for me and I get backache, so it's going to end up on rasing blocks.

There are such things as standing wheelchairs which might be a better temporary solution. Could be a challenge for some local machinists.

Evan
10-28-2009, 08:37 AM
Well, that sucks. Hope you have a good recovery. What you need is a Canadian invention, the knee crutch. Forget the wheel chair.

http://ixian.ca/pics6/crutch.jpg

http://www.abledata.com/abledata.cfm?pageid=19327&top=32253&productid=175241&trail=0&discontinued=0

You could probably build one pretty quick.

http://ixian.ca/pics6/crutch1.jpg

HighWall
10-28-2009, 09:09 AM
I ws trying to think through what might go wrong and never considered the (top heavy) lathe would tip over. Duh! I was watching my fingers as I inserted levelers into the base mountng holes concernced about mashing one or more off.

I would welcome any help uprighting the lathe. A portable engine hoist would do it and I have straps already. I am located on the far southside on Indy in Greenwood Indiana.

I should have known better than to try to level the lathe by rasing it from below. Chaulk this mistake up to over eagerness and lack of patience.
(edited for spelling - drugs again)
Thanks

So sorry to hear of your injury. I never liked the look of those holes in the Grizzly lathe bases for leveling. It makes the footprint that much smaller and makes the tool that much easier to tip over. I ended up installing my leveling devices on the outside corners of the pedestals, increasing the footprint rather than decreasing it. I think the holes that come drilled in the pedestals are for bolting the units down to the floor and would be used in conjunction with shims for leveling. Here's a picture of what I came up with for my 4003. I hope you feel better really soon.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v670/RCE1/LatheFeet.jpg

Alguy
10-28-2009, 09:26 AM
Thats a nasty injury.. While i was layed up with a broken foot 7 weeks , my injury not as severe as yours. I used an office chair (with wheels)around the house to be able to stand at a bench or counter. I bent my knee as shown in the knee crutch. and rolled around, I was able to spend time doing productive things. I did not have all the hardware you have i had a simple cast just below the knee.
Good luck heal quickly and completly..

andy_b
10-28-2009, 09:32 AM
ouch! on many fronts!

i hope you have a speedy recovery and a friend to stop over soon to set the lathe upright. the thought of the lathe laying out there on its side would probably make me forget about the ankle pain after a few days. :)

andy b.

Andrew S. Quinn
10-28-2009, 10:00 AM
Have you got an engine hoist??

Peter.
10-28-2009, 10:10 AM
Sorry to see you busted your foot mate - six months lay-up is not good at all :(

Were you raising the lathe on that scissor-jack? Not the most stable thing in the world.

Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 10:36 AM
I had rented an engine hoist and a pickup truck but had returned them the day before. I will likely have to rent another hoist and maybe able to get a friend to pick it up for me.

I was using the scissor jack from my Jeep Liberty ;-(

lazlo
10-28-2009, 10:42 AM
Wow, sorry to hear about that Gary!

We've all done dangerous things while rigging machines -- that's definitely a wake-up call!

Andrew S. Quinn
10-28-2009, 10:56 AM
Ahh I thought you might have had a hoist. Would be fairly easy to get it back off from the floor.

Alistair Hosie
10-28-2009, 10:57 AM
Wow get well old friend that stinks. It seems that lathe is indeed top heavy and in a way maybe dangerous . I heard of guys dying from such work.I read about a guy who was into motor bike racing pulled his lathe out to paint it and it fell on top of him died a slow death before he was noticed so you are lucky to be alive,so let this be a warning to all of us.. get well soon.Alistair

MickeyD
10-28-2009, 11:22 AM
Sorry to hear about your accident, that one makes my leg hurt just looking at it. Makes me kinda glad that my shop is so crowded that nothing has the room to fall over. I always thought that floor space was dangerous...

George Bulliss
10-28-2009, 11:33 AM
Sorry to hear about the ankle Gary, hope both it and the lathe make a full recovery.

I too had a six month lay-up after I broke both my heels. I spent most of that time in a wheelchair and was able to manage to get quite a bit done. The first month was a wash though. I had my legs extended straight out and the pain was enough to keep me on the couch.

After that, I was able to keep busy. The boredom of a six month recovery is enough to make a guy get creative. I didnít have any machine tools at the time but did manage to get some woodworking done. I also made a few fly rods and tied enough flies to last a lifetime.

One thing to remember: the wheelchair is about as top heavy as the lathe. On my first day home, I reached for the dogís toy on the floor and went over, right onto the heels.

George

Frank Ford
10-28-2009, 11:36 AM
Joining the others - we all hope for your early ambulation!

I, too, feel your pain, having broken my left one twice over the years.
My break wasn't so bad and I was allowed a weight bearing cast but told not to push it, so I worked from crutches. It didn't slow me down in the shop too much, except when it came to picking stuff up off the floor. I began to get really inventive with that when I was alone.

I'll second Evan's mention of the bent knee support. A physician friend broke his ankle very badly and had to use one of those for nearly six months. I didn't see his rig, but I imagine it's like that one. He said he was able to walk daily rounds in the hospital within a very short while.

Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 11:39 AM
Thanks for the replies and advice about the wheelchair being top heavy. I imagine I'll have several weeks sitting on my backside. Maybe I can spend time designing jigs and fixturres.

camdigger
10-28-2009, 11:51 AM
Sorry to hear of your accident Gary. Having restricted mobility sucks big time.

I have thus far been spared such a fate for any duration, but have attempted to help some others through this situation. One was a friend who had major back surgery and was off work for 4 months... He's learning to play guitar, mostly from youtube instructional videos and a few visits from well meanig friends who play.

IIRC there is at least one member a board here that is wheel chair bound. Hopefully, Ken'll drop by.... seems like a nice guy from his posts... he'd have some hints, I'm sure...

lazlo
10-28-2009, 11:53 AM
Maybe I can spend time designing jigs and fixturres.

Might be a good time to work on your CAD skills? Download a copy of Alibre and learn solid modeling, for example?

You can draw-up all sorts of neat projects while you wait for your leg to heal...

madman
10-28-2009, 01:43 PM
Feel for you. i think that a gradual skid like surface raised to lathe access height would be good. Then a gentle ramp up to operating height and youre there in front of the lathe. Perhaps the auto cad training may be better to do untuil healed up. Good Luck Heal Fast

John Stevenson
10-28-2009, 01:54 PM
Clumsy bastich.

.

mikem
10-28-2009, 02:29 PM
Sorry to see something you like reach out and bite you! Hope you heal well and quickly.

A piece of angle iron from front to back and a bit wider than the stand could help stabilize it for future use.

My old South Bend has a lower center of gravity and a wider stand, but from now on, I'll be extra careful. Thanks for sharing your misfortune with us--at least it wasn't your widow posting about you posthumously!

spope14
10-28-2009, 04:54 PM
My houghts for you and your speedy recovery. I broke an ankpe moving a Matsuura/Methods lathe five years back, hairline crack that set me back four weeks. Man, it happens fast. I got very lucky from what I see now.

Best to you, hope you can use the rods and such to make a good project afterwards on your new machine, healing the wounds and at least getting something good of it all....

Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 04:56 PM
I am guessing the rods and clamps will be kept by the surgeon. The S/S screws are probably disposable.

HighWall
10-28-2009, 05:04 PM
I am guessing the rods and clamps will be kept by the surgeon. The S/S screws are probably disposable.

You ought to find out if the rods and clamps are being paid for by your insurance. If they are, then if I was you, I'd keep them. They look very useful and expensive. They remind me a lot of some of the grip equipment we use in the photography and film business. Just a thought.

John Stevenson
10-28-2009, 05:43 PM
Take them off the day before you are due to have them removed and tell them you were mugged and had them stolen.

.

Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 05:47 PM
If there is a way I can keep the hardware, I will.

BadDog
10-28-2009, 05:56 PM
When they reconnected my left leg (after I ripped it off at the knee), they had a super-size version of that holding it together for about 1.5 months. I made it clear I wanted it just before surgery to remove it. The Surgeon told me that would not be possible. I complained telling him that if my insurance got billed for it, I wanted it; period. Short story, I got it, complete with a few small chunks of me still dried the threads of the rods (they cut them off and then unscrew them). Of course that was in '83, before the modern hysterics about "bio-hazards", so your mileage may vary...

Sorry to hear about the lathe and your injury, good luck!

Black_Moons
10-28-2009, 06:09 PM
id improve it. that devise looks poorly made, come on you can do better. the ulgy green anodize aluminum meh, it would look better in brass. j/k

I commend your willingness to get the lathe righted and fixed up and jump back in the hobby. hope its not to badly damaged.

May I recommend just buying a engine hoist? you can get em for like $120~200 on sale, cheaper then a few rentals, and they come part into abunch of small steel beams you can hide in the garage beween uses. you know your gonna need it again to move the lathe and such.. .and theres allways the next machine, or some car work.. etc, the 'base' section of the engine hoists come with 4 swivel casters that makes a GREAT small 1ton 'dolly' for moving around things like mills and lathes

PS: when lifting things with unstable jacks, allway block it up with 2x4's as it rises incase it tips or the jack slides out/fails. And idealy never get your fingers anywhere under it. Use fish tape if something must be drawn under it (hoist slings for example) and use vise grips/plyers if you gotta place a foot or something under it

this is also why most people invest in leveling feet, so once the feet are in ( can be a dangerious proceedure i'll admit) they can be safely adjusted.

oil mac
10-28-2009, 06:39 PM
Hi Gary,
Sorry to hear of your accident, broken bones, trauma, muscle damage, etc, are never nice, And i hope you will not be incapacitated too long, Everybody could say you were cutting corners on the safety front etc, But in that, there is no milage, Everyone of us takes chances with methods at home which can at best be described, "As coming in on a wing &a prayer" For us all, the learning curve can be painfull and long lasting From my own perspective many years back, i decided on my own to do some "elementary millwrighting &machine moving" And ended up with a hernia to prove the point, i had disregarded all the basic safety lessons i had learned over the years, in my hurry to prove i could move something beyond my physical limits.
Lathes especially the modern ones, tend to be unstable towards the front, by reason of the off balance distribution of weight in the quick change gearbox, apron etc, this malaise is compounded by the light cabinet stands nowadays and height from the floor
Being under or in front of some item of plant such as this construction, without a hoist is not good, Hope all the members decide to use a hoist &not scissor jacks
sorry also about your new lathe Garry what a bummer, hope you can fix it up as good as new, We are all saddened to hear of any mishap to one of our brother craftsmen, You take care &keep us all posted as to your progress We are with you in spirit

rsal
10-28-2009, 06:42 PM
Gary

If you have not had any offers, I am local with access to a hoist that we can use to get it set up with. Let me know

tattoomike68
10-28-2009, 06:49 PM
Oh man im sorry but have you thought of geting into knitting?

Peter N
10-28-2009, 07:02 PM
Look on the bright side, you'll save 50% on shoe wear over the next few months :D

Get well soon.

CCWKen
10-28-2009, 08:04 PM
My lathe bench has a 3 1/2" concrete slab that runs end to end and about 20" wide (deep). I don't think I could push it over if I wanted to. I built the stand and put levelers on the legs. The end drawers are from an old desk and full of heavy tooling too.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/CCWKen/ToolBox/Craftsman%20Lathe/LatheBench-2.jpg

RKW
10-28-2009, 08:13 PM
I would think that it was already paid for in one way or another by you. Are some of the rods carbon fiber by chance? ;-)

Look at it this way ... Some people have died from similar incidents, you'll be able to tell the story the rest of your life!


If there is a way I can keep the hardware, I will.

Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 08:15 PM
The bright side is I am still drawing breath and semi-mobile. Maybe I will develop upper body strength between the wheel chair and the walker.

The Artful Bodger
10-28-2009, 08:51 PM
Sorry to see your accident Gary, I think everything else that needs to be said has been already been said.

Gary Gill
10-28-2009, 08:57 PM
On a positive note, there are a couple fellows local that have offered to help up right the lathe. If all goes well tomorrow we can began to access the mechanical damage and repairs needed.

I appreciate the replies and will post my progress.

boslab
10-28-2009, 09:01 PM
watch you dont get addicted to painkillers, its bloody easy, esp the strong ones, hope you get well soon
regards
mark

motorcyclemac
10-28-2009, 09:16 PM
Wow...Gary,

That really sucks. Sorry to hear about the busted leg...and uh...cosmetically customized lathe. Man...I bet you fabricated some wonderful new words..or at least new ways to string them together.

I feel your pain. I spent January to August on my arse with a ruptured disk...and fistfulls of Percocet to keep me quiet. I got a 2.5 hour surgery on my spine and it helped ...but I still have some down time. I still get very achey some days and get some more seat time.

Get some books (Amazon is your friend) and self educate during your down time. Try to get up and about once every hour if you can. Blood clots are a very real issue with too much seat time. Deep vein thrombosis is cause for concern and it treated with rat poision. If untreated leads to stroke. Not a joking concern.

Hit some calcium Magnesium and vit D....oh and up your water intake to keep the kidneys flushed. They don't like sitting either.

Take care pal...

Cheers
Mac.

Don Young
10-28-2009, 09:23 PM
Sorry to read of your mishap. Things will jump out and bite you when you least expect it. Engine hoists are real bad to tip forward when trying to pick up something like that. They are intended for the legs to extend under what is being lifted since they have no counterbalance at the rear. Be careful.

TECHSHOP
10-28-2009, 09:50 PM
I have dumped a lathe the "long" way once and at another time been after a work place accident that took the use out of both legs for about six months I really understand.

I could see the shop from the back door of the house, but couldn't make the 50 yards across the snow to do anything in there. The meds made me too sleepy to do much with the "big tools". This was in the time before the 'net, (and I still don't have TV) so I was "on my own" for things to do. I spent a lot of time doing basic hand tool "stuff".

DebosDave
10-28-2009, 11:06 PM
Gary,

I hope you get well soon, don't feel too bad, I nearly did the same thing with a used LeBlond that I have picked up. I moved it on a pallet jack, and ended up getting it slightly off balance while trying to put the feet under it. I was able to rock it back and forth by hand, and decided to give it a go pushing it back... when I went down to put the foot under, the thing started tipping quick toward me. Thank goodness it contacted the foot the wrong way, and stopped itself, cause there was no way I was going to stop it from coming over onto me... Just a great lesson to share... so sorry you broke your leg passing it along

Godspeed

DD

Circlip
10-29-2009, 04:49 AM
Ten out of ten Gary for showing others the consequences of trying a dumb arse set up. You may have injuries, but you may also have saved someone elses life. I'll bet you're cursing the day you missed at school when they did "Centre (center) of Gravity"??

Never ceases to amaze some of the setups shown on here at times fitting wheels onto machines, invariably inboard of the machine footprint and lifted by the diameter of the wheel assemblies.

PS. If yer on the Meds, leave the on switch OFF.

Regards Ian.

Your Old Dog
10-29-2009, 10:00 AM
This a topic I know something about.

Some guy was directed to park his car on my left ankle and the net result was broken tibia and fibula along with 8 screws and 1 plate. I was not able to work in the shop because the Lortab pain med made me so weak that I could hardly stand up.

I did buy some wooden stools at Target, they were quite cheep. I stood, bent my knee and measured from parrallel knee to the floor and cut the stool legs off at that height. I then duck taped some foam rubber on top. This allowed me to stand for longer periods of time while shaving in the morning. It might work okay for using the lathe. Otherwise, your hips will hurt like hell if you aren't able to stand straight.

About a year later and still limping and walking with a cain, I had all my weight on my right leg when it shot out from under me on some ice. That broke the right ankle and it got 9 screws and 1 plate. That injury seemed to go better physically but took a hell of a toll on my psychy as I was just starting to feel better and get around a little better when the second injury happened.

One bit of advice, EXPERIMENT with your crutches. I didn't only to find out months later that the reason I was having so damn much trouble was that the nurse had them set too high when she gave them to me :D I shortened them up and was then able to get some pendulum action going for me !!

3 years later I walk with a limp but not so much from bone placement as for nerve damage that seems to come and go. Crush injurys supposedly cause a different type of problem to sensitive nerve endings.

Gary Gill
10-29-2009, 10:41 AM
YOD, I like the stool idea. We will give that a try.

Gary Gill
10-29-2009, 11:08 AM
A big thanks to Roger for coming to up right the lathe. Much appreciated.

Highpower
10-29-2009, 11:52 AM
You guys did install the levelers before up-righting the lathe right? ;)

Gary, hope you heal up soon bud. I know it's no fun just looking at your toys and not playing with them.

I came close to having an incident once when moving my lathe to it's current location. Luckily I only had it j-u-s-t off the floor when it started to tip and the feet stopped it. That's when I learned to pick that sucker up by the highest lifting point possible.

I think your post sharing your experience would make a good "sticky" to serve as a reminder for ALL of us!

rsal
10-29-2009, 12:59 PM
Highpower

We did not install the levelers as his uncle was taking them off when I arrived. In looking at the cabinet, it being sheet metal, I am not sure that it would give any strength to the lathe. My thought would be to anchor the lathe cabinet to the floor and level the lathe (if needed) from the chip pan which would eliminate lifting the lathe or changing its balance. The footprint is pretty small on that set up and installing the levelers would reduce even more.

While the lathe has some damage, most of it is cosmetic or parts that should be available from Grizzly, the best thing is that Gary will be ok and up and around in no time.

That clamp he has on would make some neat indicator holders and I think he has some ideas for them.

motorcyclemac
10-29-2009, 01:13 PM
You Sir are a good man...

Thank you for going and helping him out. Having been hurt and unable to fetch for myself, I know what it means to have help.

Cheers
Mac.

Gary Gill
10-29-2009, 03:59 PM
The only real serious damage to the lathe is a bent screw and busted casting.
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a81/N9ZYE/Brokeandbent.jpg

tattoomike68
10-29-2009, 04:07 PM
The only real serious damage to the lathe is a bent screw and busted casting.
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a81/N9ZYE/Brokeandbent.jpg

Once again im real sorry, maybe a welder friend can build you a roll cage for your lathe. maybe some wheelie bars so it cant roll over.

oil mac
10-29-2009, 04:13 PM
Glad that Roger helped with your lathe, getting it back on its feet, And that the damage is minimal, It could have been an awful lot worse Looks as though spare bracket, handle &cross screw should be off the shelf spares
It looks a nice machine, You will feel a lot better knowing it can be saved

Gary Gill
10-29-2009, 04:24 PM
TattooMike - I may try the knitting thing. Any recommendation of PPE for such?

v860rich
10-29-2009, 04:28 PM
WOW, were you lucky that's all the damage.

I was moving a giant 24" swing, 12ft bed, lathe into my shop with a floor jack under the tailstock end and a homemade engine hoist lifting the head end, when a leg collapsed on the cherry picker.

When it fell over one of the guys helping was between it and my Bridgeport, luckly the mill had been moved to get the lathe into position, and was still on the pipes, the mill moved when Vernon and the lathe hit it.

Vernon was only bruised and scratched up, thank goodness, as this could have been so much worse.

All the wheels and handles were toast, cross slide screw was bent, q/change levers bent, ect. Nothing was messed up to where you couldn't use the lathe. The things that I couldn't braze or screw back together I replaced with Vice Grips. Still use the old girl a little, but for the first 10 years I had her she got used alot

Best of healing to you. And good luck with you're new machine.

THANX RICH

People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

tattoomike68
10-29-2009, 04:39 PM
TattooMike - I may try the knitting thing. Any recommendation of PPE for such?

No but I bet some old grannies will give you some toothless loving on your bone. use this injury to your advantage.

Gary Gill
03-13-2010, 04:32 PM
Update: I am healing very well and getting around with a cane now. I am adapting to the fused ankle and will likely put the cane down in a few more months.

John Stevenson
03-13-2010, 04:58 PM
Clumsy Bastich. :rolleyes:

.

dwilliams35
03-13-2010, 05:14 PM
My wife is currently recovering from what is basically the same injury: yours seems to be worse, she had it all bolted together in one surgery and was just no-weight bearing on it for about three months.. She's walking in a boot now, using a crutch occasionally..

Your Old Dog
03-13-2010, 06:12 PM
Good to hear you are doing better with your ankle. I don't know if I'm doing better with mine or if I'm just getting used to it. They told me to try to walk without the cane and to try not to limp. I guess it's supposed to help the healing process which in turn will help you hips out. If you favor one foot or the other it shows up in your hips and that's no picnic either.

Liger Zero
04-26-2010, 04:44 PM
*casts Thread Resurrectus*


How's the healing process and most importantly did you get the lathe up and running? ;)

Years ago I watched an injection molding machine tip off a skate while being moved across the shop floor. Scary... yeah. Big 350 pound R&M director... Never seen him move that fast... not to save his ass but to push one of the riggers out of the way. Good fellow he was. ;)

Alistair Hosie
04-26-2010, 05:00 PM
I heard of a guy repainting and cleaning his lathe pulled it from the wall it fell on him and he was killed so you had a lucky escape.PS what are you doing with the ortho screw device when finished I would like it to make things from.:DAlistair real ps get well soon gary.Alistair

Gary Gill
04-26-2010, 08:05 PM
The lathe is up and running. I have been making tooling for the lathe and doing some paying work too. It has been six months and I am still regaining strength in my leg muscles. I can walk w/o the cane but I am not as stable or smooth as walking with it. I ride a recumbent trike and that is great exercise.

I haven't yet done anything with the rods and clamps from the external fixator. The rods are 8mm diameter. I might use the clamps with steel rods and indicators.

ligito
04-26-2010, 08:29 PM
Walking will help build the bone density, as will anything that allows foot to ground contact.

gnm109
04-26-2010, 09:12 PM
Clumsy Bastich. :rolleyes:

.

Don't you Brits pronounce that "Barsterd"? :)

thedieter
04-26-2010, 11:06 PM
This thread is very important and has caused flash-backs to when I got my ENCO 1340 lathe in the late 90s. (about 1200 lb.)

While I was moving it into the final position, I was using a wreaking bar to pry it under the cabinet to walk it over that last little bit. Before I reallized what was happening, the lathe tipped and if it had not hit the mill, it would have gone down all the way. I couldn't believe how easy it tipped and how top heavy it is. It tipped about 30 degrees and fortunately the only damage was that it bent the tailstock handwheel shaft slightly. No injuries except to my ego.

Since I was living in earthquake prone Southern California at the time, I added outriggers to both ends of the cabinet to improve stability. I even added a chain between an eye on the back of the motor and the wall.

Best regards, Jack (forewarned is forearmed)

gnm109
04-26-2010, 11:13 PM
This thread is very important and has caused flash-backs to when I got my ENCO 1340 lathe in the late 90s. (about 1200 lb.)

While I was moving it into the final position, I was using a wreaking bar to pry it under the cabinet to walk it over that last little bit. Before I reallized what was happening, the lathe tipped and if it had not hit the mill, it would have gone down all the way. I couldn't believe how easy it tipped and how top heavy it is. It tipped about 30 degrees and fortunately the only damage was that it bent the tailstock handwheel shaft slightly. No injuries except to my ego.

Since I was living in earthquake prone Southern California at the time, I added outriggers to both ends of the cabinet to improve stability. I even added a chain between an eye on the back of the motor and the wall.

Best regards, Jack (forewarned is forearmed)


Yes, I remember when I moved my 13 X 40 Enco into my barn around that same time.

I used a ton and a half chain hoist and an engine hoist to remove the crate from my truck. Once I got the crate on the floor, I swung the lathe into place with the engine hoist about 6" at a time. I was frightened what would happen if it fell over.

By the way, the manual says they weigh 1,411 lbs. with the stand.

malbenbut
04-27-2010, 03:36 AM
Don't you Brits pronounce that "Barsterd"?
No its pronouced ---
BASTaaaaAAAARD!
MBB

madman
04-27-2010, 05:36 AM
Bass Turds?????

krutch
04-27-2010, 04:57 PM
If no bones came through your skin, you'll be OK. In '73, I nearly lost my left leg form 83 yr. old lady trying to make me into a hood ornament. Tib & fib shattered and small strip of skin keeping foot on. Was in 'cats cradle' for nine days, then two rods inserted into what was remaining of leg. Baling wire held bone shards in place while healing. In hostpital 'bout 60 days off leg maybe 120. Thigh bone broke in two places, too. Rod in there also. Doc. did such a good job saving what could have been snipped off that I returned to work at Rail Road.
I still have the rods around here somewhere.
Hard to tell, but doesn't look as though lathe is too hurt.
I worked with broke ankle at BP with a chair once. Swelling discomfort was the worst part of that.
I'm on the other side of Ill. from you so wont be coming to help 'right' you lathe, but wish you luck with everything.


Mentally confused alright, didn't read OP date before my post! Cheeeess!

tyleryoungblood
06-08-2010, 01:57 AM
I know a lot of people are teasing you about what happened, but I have to say I could see myself making a similar mistake. I don't have any experience moving heavy equipment and looking back at what I have moved (a few 300-400 pound small lathes, and atlas mill, etc) I can see now that some of the methods I used weren't exactly safe. But they were relatively light machines by comparison so a little extra muscling from the guys helping me move the machines kept us from getting hurt. But that's no excuse.

Growing up I loved having older siblings because I always got to learn from their mistakes (and thus avoid a few beatings from the parents). I've just learned from your mistake in a similar fashion and I wanted to thank you for that! I'm glad you're lathe made it through relatively unscathed. I hope you make a full recovery!

TheAndroid
06-08-2010, 10:19 AM
I don't have any experience moving heavy equipment ...

I think this is a common lament. Rigging and lifting information seems to be one of those subjects which is learned the hard way. I suppose after a few episodes like this, one just starts "getting it."

When I first lifted my ZAY, I made all the wrongs moves. Starting with doing it alone, after hours, with my phone on the other side of the shop. Had I got pinned, I probably would still be under the damn thing.

gnm109
06-08-2010, 10:41 AM
I was fortunate when I found my mill in a warehouse last year. My friend is a skilled professional machinist with years of experience moving machines. He helped me out from start to finish. The mill weighs 3,500 pounds so it was new territory for me.

I had to pay a local rigger $200 to get it out of the back of the warehouse where it was stored and then to set it down on our flatbed trailer. We took it in one piece and it rode beautifully.

On the other end, my friend brought his 5,000 pound capacity forklift and moved it in place for me. There would have been no way for me to do this on my own. Had I even attempted to move it myself, it would have surely been a disaster with more than one broken bone.

I'm glad that the OP here is healing up!




In the warehouse:

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/MachineryWebbMillA.jpg

On the trailer:

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/MachineryWebbMillB.jpg

In the shop:

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/WebbChamp4VH002.jpg

kc5ezc
06-08-2010, 11:42 AM
Don't you Brits pronounce that "Barsterd"?
No its pronouced ---
BASTaaaaAAAARD!
MBB
I served at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana in the mid (nineteen) sixties with a Brit:
Wing Commander Bastard. He would let you know very clearly that his name was pronounced as we yanks say it. Plain old bastard.
good fellow.

Black_Moons
06-08-2010, 12:59 PM
Allways ask a friend to 'help' you move your heavy equipment! they will usally say no, untill you tell them they just need to watch and call 911 if something goes wrong and not actualy lift anything :)

'Hi, Can you help me move my 1000lb lathe?'
'Uhhh.... NO'
'Don't worry! you don't have to lift anything, I just want you to supervise and call 911 if anything goes wrong' '... oh... Ok then.. I like supervising'

Infact, I would'nt even ask them to actualy help unless its something like push on it a little to align it while I put these bolts in.

If they start shoving it around or do the straping and something goes wrong.. well, you'll be blaming them if the lathe gets damaged, and they will be blaming you (and you'll be blaming yourself) if they get hurt.

If you do it, well its just 'awww I screwed up' and life goes on, no hard feelings.

Do not rush it, do not try and hump it all in one day, Have *GOOD* new tarps incase you have to leave it outside when it starts raining (It snowed in april on my lathe...) It took me about a week to get my mill and lathe down into the basement and onto its stand! But it arrived without a scratch.

Alistair Hosie
06-08-2010, 04:19 PM
Wow sorry to hear of your problems again ,man you need to be more careful . I read of several people killing themselves with cleaning lathes and trying to move them ,anyway glad it's not life threatening, although nasty enough in it's own way .The very best of luck for machining asap.Alistair

BigMike782
06-08-2010, 09:58 PM
I realize it's and old thread but still sorry to read of your accident but glad to see your on the mend!
When I moved my Bridgeport out of the old codgers(94) shop the only help was his son(never touched a hammer in his life) and his nephew.I did all the actual moving myself.He(the codger)insisted I use his machine skates.I had serious concern because they raised the machine more than I was comfortable with and because the floor was uneven concrete.My concerns had merit as we started to round a corner one of the skates came out from under the corner it was holding and then his son gave the machine a push when I was not expecting and it started to go over.As I realized what was happening and trying to move out of the way I pushed on the mill and stopped its movement.....needless to say it came off those DAMNED skates!
I got VERY lucky as I would have been under the mill and surely crushed.
Center of gravity is important but so is inertia.......once something starts to move/fall/tip GET OUT OF THE WAY! machines can be replaced people cannot.
I hope I never have to go through the recuperation some of you are or have cause it sounds very painful.

wtrueman
06-09-2010, 12:14 AM
Another thing: Back in 1980, I moved two 350 lantaines about 75 feet into my school shop. It was there that I learned how unsteady lathes are. Anyway, knowing this, I recessed 1/2 inch steel pads into the cement under the feet so the lathe had a secure footing. Levelled all, and then bolted a short length of chain to each corner of the lathe and welded the other end of the chain to the floor steel. Over the years, we have swung a whole bunch of metal off the three and four jaw chucks and although the lathe(s) vibrated and rattled, they were not able to tilt. Maybe this accident is something we should all pay attention to. BTW; in my retirement, I have a small 9" Hercus which is tilty and an OLD 18 inch South Bend (circa 1920) which has cast legs. It is way more stable. These two legs look to weigh probably 4-500 lbs each. Giving a guess,maybe the old timers had something we don`t today, safety in mind from the factory, my .02, Wayne.

gnm109
06-09-2010, 11:10 AM
..............Maybe this accident is something we should all pay attention to.

..............Giving a guess,maybe the old timers had something we don`t today, safety in mind from the factory, my .02, Wayne.


This is very sage advice. I was a safety consultant for a large workers compensatoin insurance company for nearly 12 years and I've seen numerous instances of serious injuries from faling and tipping machines.

Cranes and forklifts were the worst offenders but we can all learn from this accident.

The main thing is, don't be afraid to ask someone else for help. And if all else fails, pay a rigger so that nothing bad happens.

.