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View Full Version : What's a TiN 2 flute end mill good for?



beanbag
10-29-2009, 06:01 AM
You'd be better off with 3 flutes or more on steels...
You don't want to use it in aluminum, because TiN is not good for that...
Not as sharp as an uncoated end mill in plastics...

Evan
10-29-2009, 09:57 AM
Grind off all but the outer third of the cutting edge of one flute on the face. Makes an excellent small diameter fly cutter.

camdigger
10-29-2009, 11:09 AM
BB

The end mill will still work to remove metal.

The applications listed in catalogs are "optimized" for tool life, stock removal, and surface finish. In fact, different configurations are commonly optimized for different outcomes - roughing vs finish for one example. Often the optimization is for industrial conditions - something often difficult to replicate in the home shop. If the end mill is in the drawer, I'd use it, examine the results and change tooling only if warranted.

My $.02 cdn (worth more every day lately:D ), YMMV

Carld
10-29-2009, 03:17 PM
I don't buy tin coated endmills but two flute endmills are great for cutting keyways or slots.

Timleech
10-29-2009, 03:20 PM
Is it 'centre cutting', ie one cutting edge on the end goes beyond the centre line?
If so, it'll be what some of us know as a Slot Drill, intended for keyways etc (two flutes should cut a slot width more accurately than three) and capable of plunge cutting.

Tim

lazlo
10-29-2009, 03:22 PM
I don't buy tin coated endmills but two flute endmills are great for cutting keyways or slots.

Like Carl says, 2-flute endmills are meant for milling slots and keyways. A 3- or 4-flute endmill will push off-axis from the cutting thrust and widen the slot.

That's why our British colleagues call them slot drills :)

Al Messer
10-29-2009, 03:46 PM
Slotting comes to mind to me.

oil mac
10-29-2009, 04:04 PM
Yes we call them slot drills in the U.K.& as timleech says if it is centre cutting, you can plunge cut, I use them to slot drill, and i have used some of the tin coated ones at home and find them excellent on mild steels
For work at home i am not hammering them as much as in industry, therefore making my end mills last is a big consideration as /cost.

exkenna
10-30-2009, 06:27 PM
2 flute end mills are used in operations or materials where you may experience chip evacuation problems, typically deep slotting in aluminum, or some other non ferrous materials. Counterboring, ramping, and plunging ops also.

Titanium Nitride was a 1st gen coating. It has decent wear resistance and pretty good lubricity.

Evan
10-30-2009, 06:34 PM
Slot drill isn't just a British term, it is a general descriptive term for a 2 flute end mill that is centre cutting.

http://machine-tools.netfirms.com/05_Types%20Of%20Milling%20Cutter.htm

beanbag
10-30-2009, 07:13 PM
Titanium Nitride was a 1st gen coating. It has decent wear resistance and pretty good lubricity.

Yeah, but is it better than nothing on aluminum? I read that Al tends to stick to it.

lazlo
10-30-2009, 07:21 PM
Yeah, but is it better than nothing on aluminum? I read that Al tends to stick to it.

Most coatings, including TiN, require a large SFM to activate. Typically way beyond the realm of home shop machines.

airsmith282
10-30-2009, 07:31 PM
ii have used 2 flut end mills for many things, i find then really good for slotting on steel as well as aluim, i tried 4 and 6 fluts on alum and the dont seem to do as well as the 2 flut, but thats my experience, i say just use for what ever you want if it works for the job your doing go with it, ,

John Stevenson
10-30-2009, 07:33 PM
Slot drill isn't just a British term, it is a general descriptive term for a 2 flute end mill that is centre cutting.

http://machine-tools.netfirms.com/05_Types%20Of%20Milling%20Cutter.htm

Unfortunately Evan whilst I fully agree with you the manufacturers now don't.

What we knew as 2 flute centre cutting slot drills and 4 flute non centre cutting end mills has all been changed as the UK / US designations have become internationalised by companies merging and the advent of CNC grinders that can now grind tools we couldn't have before like 5 flute centre cutting.

You only have to get a book like the J&L book for the manufactures to contradict each other in their descriptions.

As an example you get one manufacturer calling a cutter a 4 flute end mill and also another calling them slot mills.
End mills at one time had a recess in the middle which meant they wouldn't plunge, now most don't. The grinding has changed and so has the terminology.

Moltrech and Chapman described what was common in their day, now there are no standards. I'd love to see how a exam sheet got marked today given these changes.


.

lazlo
10-30-2009, 07:50 PM
Moltrech and Chapman described what was common in their day, now there are no standards.

Virtually no one here (in the 'States) uses the term "Slot Drill". The only place I've ever seen it is Model Engineer and Model Engineering Workshop articles.