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skyboltone
11-02-2009, 11:23 AM
I picked up a Craftsman/Atlas 6" X 18" over the weekend. $170. First lathe. A week ago I couldn't spell lathe. I bought it based on reading here.

Lantern tool post, (gotta go) shiney grey paint, smooth shiney ways, three jaw ( no wrench) mounted on a welded L shape 2" X 10" steel channel bracket in turn welded to the top of an old oven painted grey.

Can't wiggle the chuck, belonged to a gunsmith.

First a toolpost
I would really like to mill simple things. Could a guy adopt a 6" round 3 axis mill vise to lay on it's side? Otherwise I'll pay for the right accessory.

Need some book reccomendations.
I am a professional guitar amp builder. There are projects in my head to make that easier and better. That's why I bought the thing. Shop space is prescious, otherwise I would have looked for a SB 9A

I have huge issues to deal with Today and tommorow and perhaps longer. (Death in Family, not unexpected) I promise photos when this is over.

Nice to be a part of the community.
Dan

Roy Andrews
11-02-2009, 02:52 PM
welcome! i have only done a little milling with a lathe but when i did i made a plate to fit onto a spare compound i got with a lot of other parts in a deal on e-bay. i mounted the compound to an angle plate. i may still have some pieces. if you're interested let me know.

Peter.
11-02-2009, 02:55 PM
I did mill a couple of things on my Atlas 10D. It was a painful process though I didn't realise quite how painful at the time. Atlas made a vertical slide attachment - I got one with my lathe. You might look for one of those if you're determined.

mf205i
11-02-2009, 03:12 PM
Start with these.
http://metalwebnews.com/machine-tools/fmt.html
http://www.bbssystem.com/manuals/Lathe-Tutorial.pdf
See HTRAL at http://www.wswells.com/index.html
http://www.jjjtrain.com/vms/library.html
https://atiam.train.army.mil/soldierPortal/appmanager/soldier/start?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=rdlservicespage
http://opensourcemachine.org/node/10
http://www.metalwebnews.org/ftp/machinery-repairman.pdf
http://www.americanmachinetools.com/...se_a_lathe.htm
http://www.sherline.com/grinding.htm

And donít forget to download your FREE copy of Machineryís handbook, Edition 5, at Google books.
http://books.google.com/books?id=VkEYAAAAYAAJ

Have fun, Mike

dockrat
11-02-2009, 03:13 PM
Before I had a real mill, I made up this thing using the compound of my lathe for the Z axis for some light milling i had to do.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP0372Small.jpg

Carld
11-02-2009, 03:13 PM
Palmgren makes milling attachments for lathes and they clamp where the tool post goes on the compound.

Hmm, I hope the lathe is not welded to the angle iron as you imply.

look on the internet for a copy of How To Run a Lathe by South Bend Lathe Works and a copy of Manual of Lathe Operation and Machinists Tables by Atlas Press Co.

Both are good basic books on lathe operations and every beginner should own them and keep them.

You will eventually need a copy of Machinery Handbook and you can buy all of these used.

skyboltone
11-03-2009, 12:40 AM
Before I had a real mill, I made up this thing using the compound of my lathe for the Z axis for some light milling i had to do.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP0372Small.jpg
This looks slicker than snail snot. And AL7RU to you buddy. 73s
Dan

skyboltone
11-03-2009, 12:52 AM
Palmgren makes milling attachments for lathes and they clamp where the tool post goes on the compound.

Sounds interesting I'll check.


Hmm, I hope the lathe is not welded to the angle iron as you imply.

Nothing implied or meant. The channel stock is welded into an ell to support the ways with the base of the L holding the moter very secure. The lathe is bolted on. Then the channel is welded to the oven. If I can strip the interior out of the oven and replace it with drawers it's going to work fine. I would refit the oven top with a piece of sheetmetal without the cutouts for the burners, then install a drain for coolant. Whoever did it made about 6 little 1/2" welds. They will grind off easily if I decide to mount it atop something else. Like I mentioned shop space is REALLY scarce.


look on the internet for a copy of How To Run a Lathe by South Bend Lathe Works and a copy of Manual of Lathe Operation and Machinists Tables by Atlas Press Co.

Those look like just the titles I need. Turning for dummies.


You will eventually need a copy of Machinery Handbook and you can buy all of these used.
That one I have.
Thanks!
Dan

skyboltone
11-03-2009, 01:03 AM
Great links. I wonder if a guy could find that Herco book at a used book store. Plugging it in all the way to case hardening and everything inbetween.

Black_Moons
11-03-2009, 04:19 AM
Milling on the lathe is a rather flawed process, you have very limited Y/X axis, And the carriage is usally held on only by a single gib at the back and some prismatic ways, Not dovetail ways like most mills. Lathes are generaly designed to experiance forces in the down or up direction on the carriage, not sideways/etc. Id really recommend saving up for a real mill, you can get a new IH mill for as cheap as $2100

skyboltone
11-03-2009, 01:39 PM
Milling on the lathe is a rather flawed process, you have very limited Y/X axis, And the carriage is usally held on only by a single gib at the back and some prismatic ways, Not dovetail ways like most mills. Lathes are generaly designed to experiance forces in the down or up direction on the carriage, not sideways/etc. Id really recommend saving up for a real mill, you can get a new IH mill for as cheap as $2100
I'm sure you're right. Good thing is, I have a close friend who manages a large machine shop. There are lots of auction right now and I'm going to see if I can get him to find me a smaller Bridgeport on the cheap. Once again though, shop space.......My table saw is far too big. It may have to go in favor of a Unisaw of some considerable vintage. What's an IH mill? I wish there was such a thing as a vintage american made mill drill.

I got a 1958 copy of the South Bend book coming off Amazon used.

skyboltone
11-03-2009, 03:57 PM
Here's what I need.

http://i38.tinypic.com/20uzoeq.jpg

Tony Ennis
11-03-2009, 06:28 PM
...Unisaw of some considerable vintage.

Har, my Unisaw is a Rockwell :D You have some huge iron extensions on yours or something?

If your needs would be served by a milling attachment on a 6" lathe, a typical $1,000 Chicom mill-drill will do you nicely.

The idea that an ampmaker needs a Bridgeport terrifies me! I bet your amps go to 11.

skyboltone
11-03-2009, 10:27 PM
Har, my Unisaw is a Rockwell :D You have some huge iron extensions on yours or something?

If your needs would be served by a milling attachment on a 6" lathe, a typical $1,000 Chicom mill-drill will do you nicely.

The idea that an ampmaker needs a Bridgeport terrifies me! I bet your amps go to 11.
Well......yeah, like a dummy I saw this deal in CL here for a Powermatic Mod. #72. The table is 38 deep X 48 wide, with a 12" extension in it for a router. I had no idea what a pain in the a** a 1250LB saw can be; in a 8' by 18' shop. So it sits at the end of the shop and the fall drops into the driveway, then I go around through the side door to the garage, throught the gate and pick it up. A Unisaw with no extension would work handy. And I have a 1965 Delta contractors saw too (outside under a tarp). And a snowflake 1932 Boice Crane 14" bandsaw, and a 1932 (?) Delta (no Milwaukee, no Rockwell, no serial number) 6" jointer, and a Mod #220 14" Delta Milwaukee DP etc. And a ton of electronic stuff too.
And besides what ever difference does NEED have to do with tools? It's WANT! Remember, buy, never sell. Let the next generation worry about that. :D :D
I'll buy the house next door and put the BP in there. Just kidding.

Dan

gunbuilder
11-03-2009, 11:36 PM
Well......yeah, like a dummy I saw this deal in CL here for a Powermatic Mod. #72. The table is 38 deep X 48 wide, with a 12" extension in it for a router. I had no idea what a pain in the a** a 1250LB saw can be; in a 8' by 18' shop. So it sits at the end of the shop and the fall drops into the driveway, then I go around through the side door to the garage, throught the gate and pick it up. A Unisaw with no extension would work handy. And I have a 1965 Delta contractors saw too (outside under a tarp). And a snowflake 1932 Boice Crane 14" bandsaw, and a 1932 (?) Delta (no Milwaukee, no Rockwell, no serial number) 6" jointer, and a Mod #220 14" Delta Milwaukee DP etc. And a ton of electronic stuff too.
And besides what ever difference does NEED have to do with tools? It's WANT! Remember, buy, never sell. Let the next generation worry about that. :D :D
I'll buy the house next door and put the BP in there. Just kidding.

Dan

Wow Dan, sounds like you need to build a new building.

I would remake a new table for the Lathe, I have heard the best table is made of 2X4 lumber on edge. Like a bowling lane, bolted and glued together. Then the lathe bolted to that.

Yes, you need a milling attachment for your lathe, just be sure to take very light cuts. Tighten your cross slide gib and start saving for a mill (not a drillpress like I did).

Thanks,
Paul

skyboltone
11-03-2009, 11:46 PM
What I need is to park the cars in the driveway where they belong. Then I got plenty of room. I have control over the third bay of a three car garage. I'm gonna put a wall up to "protect the cars from the dust" and shift myself another 2 feet by accident. :cool: