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hoof
11-03-2009, 10:42 AM
We have a lathe here at work that was made by a company called "Goodway", Never heared of them before either. I looks an awful lot like a Jet or Grizzly. The issue we are have is on the electrical controls. The are located just beneith the gear box on the headstock. What I find as odd about this it 1.) They are 110vac, 2.) They are on a lathe with a flood coolant system. 3.) The enclosure they are in is far from water tight. 4.) The operator is a risk for both erratic start/stopping of the machine, This did in fact happen and the machine is currently locked-out to prevent further use. My question is there some standards that are adapted for the import of machine tools. UL, NEMA or the like. And one would also thing 110vac in a wet location is not smart, But is it not goverened ?

Thanks in advance
Hoof

SGW
11-03-2009, 11:47 AM
Who added the flood coolant system? Probably the lathe was sold without it, so no special precautions had to be taken for the wiring. Now that there is flood coolant, the wiring needs to be addressed.

I think you need a NEMA 4X enclosure, but it might be some other standard for machine tools.

tattoomike68
11-03-2009, 01:50 PM
I have ran 3 goodway lathes, all had coolent. I can see it real scarry if you are using collets and coolent.

you are right about the micro switches, the damn things will turn themselves on at any moment. We named one "Danger Lathe"

To use it you turn the HI / LO swithch to the OFF position but still dont trust it, stand on the foot brake any time you are chucking up a part.

I ended up fixing it by making a new micro switch activator lever and putting in bigger better microswitches. In fact its not a bad idea to just rewire the whole front pannel and seal it up with some silicone.

Other than the front electrical pannel they are a nice lathe.

hoof
11-04-2009, 08:24 AM
This lathe came from the factory with the flood coolant system built in. Some of it is integral with the castings. Did they allow imports like this to enter the country without and UL approval or the like. I wonder if this is still the case. After reading your reply Tattoomike I am now convinced that a front panel upgrade is in order. I will have the folks I work with by a new enclosure (Larger) and have all the electric that gets wet function on 24 volts. Thanks again

Hoof

Black_Moons
11-04-2009, 08:52 AM
Sounds like some modifications are in order. like a remote panel and run 24v AC to the switch (And have the switch activate relays), and make a spash proof enclosure for the switch, if not sealed (of course, poorly sealed enclosures may have water ingress problems, So sometimes spash proof can be much easyer then sealed)

There is likey also sealed switchs with leads or waterproof connectors running off them you could aquire (For $$)

Paul Alciatore
11-04-2009, 10:55 AM
ALL the effected switches definitely need to be replaced. I would move the controls to a better location. Like ABOVE the machine and add a splash/chip guard between them and the work area. That way, gravity will work for you instead of against. If this is done, you can probably avoid using an expensive, liquid tight enclosure. If you replace them in the present locations, get sealed switches and seal the enclosure or replace it with a sealed one.

Falcon67
11-04-2009, 12:19 PM
This lathe came from the factory with the flood coolant system built in. Some of it is integral with the castings. Did they allow imports like this to enter the country without and UL approval or the like. I wonder if this is still the case. ..

Hoof
AFAIK, there is no laws requiring UL approval on anything. There may be local requirements, but typically UL certification is voluntary.

J Tiers
11-04-2009, 08:29 PM
AFAIK, there is no laws requiring UL approval on anything. There may be local requirements, but typically UL certification is voluntary.

Not at ALL true.

Check OSHA.... last time I checked they were Federal.

OSHA requires anything electrical installed in a 'workplace" to have a recognition from a 'recognized safety agency", which could be UL, or ETL, or VDE etc, so long as they test to the same standards. OSHA cannot disallow any 'NRTL", but they can and do require recognition.

I assume the shop in question is a 'workplace" covered by OSHA.

Weston Bye
11-04-2009, 09:03 PM
Not at ALL true.

Check OSHA.... last time I checked they were Federal.

OSHA requires anything electrical installed in a 'workplace" to have a recognition from a 'recognized safety agency", which could be UL, or ETL, or VDE etc, so long as they test to the same standards. OSHA cannot disallow any 'NRTL", but they can and do require recognition.

I assume the shop in question is a 'workplace" covered by OSHA.

This surprises me. 10 years ago, when I was in business building machine tool control systems, the only places that *required* UL certification was the City of Chicago and the City of L.A., where the requirement was written right into the electrical code. Nowhere else was UL certification required - not Ford, not GM, none of the tier 2 or 3 customers, nobody.

Even today, where I work, there is no such requirement for the production machinery we buy.

Not saying it isn't so, just saying nobody I know is aware (or wants to be aware?). Perhaps things have changed in the last 10 years.

tattoomike68
11-04-2009, 09:03 PM
OSHA can olny do so much, they are government workers who mostly screw the dog all day.

Its up to you to fix your stuff anyway. why care what those peices of crap OSHA. think, you know its bad so fix the damn thing or get fired.

cuslog
11-04-2009, 09:33 PM
I know very little about US reg's but I'm wondering if the machines in question were imported several years ago and maybe entered the US and were sold "under the radar".
I bought an import lathe and mill from a dealer in Calgary about 3 years ago. I had to wait to take delivery on both of them until they "upgraded" some of the offshore wiring and had it approved by a CSA (our version of UL) inspector.
I would think that if these machines were to come to the attention of OSHA they would be locked out until they were brought up to standard.

tattoomike68
11-04-2009, 09:53 PM
I know very little about US reg's but I'm wondering if the machines in question were imported several years ago and maybe entered the US and were sold "under the radar".
I bought an import lathe and mill from a dealer in Calgary about 3 years ago. I had to wait to take delivery on both of them until they "upgraded" some of the offshore wiring and had it approved by a CSA (our version of UL) inspector.
I would think that if these machines were to come to the attention of OSHA they would be locked out until they were brought up to standard.

All machines are what you get is what you see, once you drop them on the floor its up to YOU to make them right, do you need a babysitter? I hope not and real shops just fix the problem.

I would fire a man who gripes about a machine and wont fix it. If you cant fix a machine you need to work at wal-mart selling cheese balls.

J Tiers
11-04-2009, 10:35 PM
All machines are what you get is what you see, once you drop them on the floor its up to YOU to make them right, do you need a babysitter? I hope not and real shops just fix the problem.

I would fire a man who gripes about a machine and wont fix it. If you cant fix a machine you need to work at wal-mart selling cheese balls.

And others would fire a man FOR fixing the machine.........

"I pay you to make parts, not waste my time fixing a machine. Go use a different one."

"Real" shops ignore the problem until it is really essential to have that machine, and then the boss will yell and scream and ask why he wasn't told about it, despite having been told 5 times and having told the person who mentioned it to quit bellyaching and shut up already and he'd deal with it .

Chuckster
11-29-2009, 01:43 PM
The Co. I work for is selling there Goodway1640, its a 1985 mfg. I was thinking about putting in a bid for it. It has 2 broken gears due to a guy not thinking. It still works good in all the other gears. But this post has brought up a safety concern. I havent seen any problems with the switch system in the last 20 years of employment. What do you think the cost to make the safety improvment would cost if I get some help in the electrical area ? Any one know who could make gears that wouldn't cost more than the lathe is worth? Thank You for any help.

DougA
11-29-2009, 02:56 PM
I know very little about US reg's but I'm wondering if the machines in question were imported several years ago and maybe entered the US and were sold "under the radar".
I bought an import lathe and mill from a dealer in Calgary about 3 years ago. I had to wait to take delivery on both of them until they "upgraded" some of the offshore wiring and had it approved by a CSA (our version of UL) inspector.
I would think that if these machines were to come to the attention of OSHA they would be locked out until they were brought up to standard.
CSA is not the Canadian equivelant to UL. There is a ULC for that. CSA is different and addresses more then UL or ULC. For example a band saw having all ULC components won't pass CSA standards until it has door switches on to prevent operation with the wheel doors open. Don't ask me how I know it was a major head ache.