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alsinaj
02-08-2002, 11:56 AM
Anybody know how to make a vortex cooler? JCA

SGW
02-08-2002, 01:35 PM
A while ago I ran across some plans on the Internet, but when I just checked my bookmark the site is no longer there. Try doing a search though, and see what you can find.

Thrud
02-08-2002, 11:15 PM
www.visi.com/~darus/hilsch/ (http://www.visi.com/~darus/hilsch/)
This site has a good write up on it and some drawings.

Venturi Tube, aka Vortex Tube, aka Hilsch Vortex Tube

The story goes a French gent discovered it, but the Germans recovered it and physicist Rudolf Hilsch of the German Army took it and developed it further. The tube was based on James Clerk Maxwell's thereom of random distribution.

Dave

SGW
02-10-2002, 02:38 PM
So...how does one machine a spiral pocket if one doesn't have a CNC or EDM sitting in the basement?

Seems as though one could conceivably do it with a lathe that has power cross feed, but you'd have to turn the spindle by hand.



[This message has been edited by SGW (edited 02-10-2002).]

Thrud
02-11-2002, 01:17 AM
SGW

Actually I would machine the spiral then press fit or silver solder it in a housing. Yu could use a rotary table and table feed to mill it - like making ball handles (Aargh!)!

Dave


[This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 02-11-2002).]

kap pullen
02-11-2002, 10:03 AM
Set your blank on the rotary table,

Calculate how many thou per degrees you need.

Plunge cut to the starting point (vertical cuts using the mills drilling handle).

Rotate the rotary table say 2 degrees, move x axis .004 (for example) plunge thru the blank.

Repeat till you have cut your spirial.

This is a time consuming but effective way to cut cams used since Hector was a pup.

The screw machine guys use an indexing head geared to the x axis screw, and by varying spindle, and index head angle, can cut any uniform circular taper they need.
Clear as mud again.

A die grinder will smooth the minute steps in the spirial.

kapullen

bspooh
02-11-2002, 06:42 PM
After reading your topic., I did a little searching myself...I went to www.google.com (http://www.google.com) and typed in "vortec cooling" or maybe it was "vortex cooling", I can't remember..but their is a lot of information on how it works, but I couldn't find much usefull info on how to go about doing it..

I would think,(this might sound stupid, but it might give you other ideas,,,,bear with me) If you machine a lot of washers, and drill a hole off center in all of the washers., then maybe stack them all together, but rotating each individual one, and then maybe welding all together so the off set hole would make a spiral..Know what I mean?? Kind of stupid, huh??? I want to build one myself, so I will put more thought into it....I get bored sometimes, like the time when I made a venturi...It worked, but it is still sitting on my toolbox doing absolutely nothing....what a life...

brent

alsinaj
02-12-2002, 12:46 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Thrud:
www.visi.com/~darus/hilsch/ (http://www.visi.com/~darus/hilsch/)
This site has a good write up on it and some drawings.

Venturi Tube, aka Vortex Tube, aka Hilsch Vortex Tube

The story goes a French gent discovered it, but the Germans recovered it and physicist Rudolf Hilsch of the German Army took it and developed it further. The tube was based on James Clerk Maxwell's thereom of random distribution.

Dave</font>

Thanks, Dave. Great web site! Looks to me as if the simplest way to make the spiral is just to drill and file. The unit in the drawings is a lot bigger than the commercial units. I'm going to add this to my list of things to try. If it could be reduced to a reasonable size, it would be great for cooling end mills and tools being ground on a grinder.

Thrud
02-12-2002, 01:13 AM
Brent,

At least SOME people have a life - don't include me in that group!

What you are trying to do is create a mini tornado - hard to do in a closed tube (open at both ends). I would try a tube inserted at a tangent to the tube (and maybe slanted towards the hot exit) - it might not work, but it is easier than milling that log(x) based spiral. You also want to accelerate the air out of the hot end (venturi's can do this).

Science is "kentucky windage" at best (Lucky guess) - more tripping over "it" in the dark sometimes than deliberate investigation - at least at first blush (eureka!) it is.

The electronics industry are now using these tubes in high reliability cooling conditions. As long as compressed gas is availible, they work - no moving parts. Refridgeration units for electronics (H132 Freon & Pelltier devices) have more parts in their systems and do fail, these tubes do not and provide moving air at the same time in the cabinet.

Dave

Tim#1
02-12-2002, 07:17 AM
JCA:

Plans for a Hilsch vortex tube are contained in the "The Amateur Scientist," by C.L. Stong. Pubs: Simon & Schuster, Inc., 1960, pages 514-520. This book is great and may still be found in some public libraries. I found my copy through an Internet-based book search. This version of the vortex tube uses plumbing fittings. The vortex chamber cross section is a one-turn spiral. I've seen another design where the inlet tube is also tangential and at right angles to larger hole; the compressed air is forced to follow the curve. Simpler to machine, but not sure if it's not as efficient. Best luck with your experiments.

TIM

Randy
02-12-2002, 10:33 AM
The website that Dave refers to is the same as the article that Tim refers to, first published in Scientific American in 1958. (Not that I'm trying to talk you out of a trip to the library!)

SGW
02-13-2002, 05:06 PM
This page intentionally left blank.... :-)

I tried something but it didn't work. Maybe later.




[This message has been edited by SGW (edited 02-13-2002).]

Robert Jones
02-13-2002, 09:52 PM
Try this site for some info

http://www.visi.com/~darus/hilsch/

there seems to be a lot on the subject, good luck, Bobby

Thrud
02-13-2002, 10:18 PM
I was cruising the Travers catalog at four in the morning (we tool sluts are like that) and noticed that Vortec's tube uses 15CFM but produces -40*, the others only muster 20* F with 7.5 CFM. Big differences in price too!

Dave ;-)