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dp
11-07-2009, 01:52 AM
I'm feeling a little better about my last drywall project - and my next:

http://www.news-press.com/article/20091107/SS15/911070408/1075

lazlo
11-07-2009, 03:12 AM
"Two critical answers to myriad questions surrounding the corrosive causes and effects of defective Chinese drywall were provided by experts at a two-day Tampa symposium that ended Friday.


The drywall is not a hazard to human health.
The culprit ingredient behind the corrosive effects of the drywall is elemental sulfur."

Evan
11-07-2009, 03:18 AM
The problem with that study is it will never hold up in the face of expert opinion such as this:


U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Orlando, disagrees that the drywall is not harmful to health. He gave the keynote speech at the conference.

"I can only repeat what I said because common sense tells you that if something is corroding air conditioning coils so bad they can't be used, you can imagine what it's doing to your respiratory system," Nelson said.

The senator said he visited the home of Richard and Patti Kampf of Cape Coral, who have defective drywall, and immediately felt congested.



Unfortunately there is a major flaw in his reasoning. He isn't an airconditioner coil. Air conditioners produce cold air.

Evan
11-07-2009, 03:36 AM
This is interesting:



It could be a bit of a red herring to focus the examination of sulphur problems in Florida just on Chinese-made drywall. After all, drywall is drywall (unless China used its drywall to dispose of other forms of its waste sulphur — of which its growing economy has many). On the other hand, Florida has a lot of sources of sulphur that can contaminate its environment and cause failures of copper-containing equipment components or may even cause a variety of health problems.

Perhaps one of the first issues to be examined should be whether any of Florida’s phosphogypsum was exported to China and whether then it was used there to produce drywall that was exported to the whole world and to Florida. It would not hurt to prove that that route of environmental pollution in Florida can and should be ruled out.

Then it may be worth the effort to see how much of Florida’s phosphogypsum made its way into road and parking lot construction in Lee County and in other areas affected by sulphur-pollution problems. After all, Florida ran a lot of experiments in the early 1990s to find practical ways by which to get rid of its masses of waste-phosphogypsum.


http://lce.folc.ca/category/mercury/

SteveF
11-07-2009, 08:27 AM
Evan -

Apparently you aren't keeping up with the latest medical advances. Many people in Florida have lung problems and have copper medical devices which help them to breathe. Corrosion of these IS a medical problem. Rep Nelson is simply standing up for his constituents and their lobbying group - Copper Respirator Assisted Persons (or CRAP for short).

Steve.

John Stevenson
11-07-2009, 11:15 AM
Evan -

Apparently you aren't keeping up with the latest medical advances. Many people in Florida have lung problems and have copper medical devices which help them to breathe. Corrosion of these IS a medical problem. Rep Nelson is simply standing up for his constituents and their lobbying group - Copper Respirator Assisted Persons (or CRAP for short).

Steve.

Or the Sulphur Hazard Investigation Team [ or SHĎT for short ]

.

Scishopguy
11-07-2009, 11:49 AM
If you think back to the 80's, Florida's big cities, especially Jacksonville, had a really bad problem with sulphur in the smog that percipitated out in the form of H2SO4. It was so bad that it was bubbling paint on cars and causing womens hose to fall apart on their legs. The culpret was high sulphur fuel oil used by industry and home heating units. The presence of sulphur combined with moisture in the form of sea fog made this happen. I would suspect that the presence of sulphur in drywall combined with Florida's ever present 80% humidity is the cause of similar problems in homes. As for the phosphate industry, I would not put it past them trying to shove the nasty stuff under the table.

bruto
11-07-2009, 04:00 PM
So basically you can breathe it, but it will eat your plumbing out?

Tomorrow's headline: CHINESE DRYWALL FOUND TO BE DROWNING HAZARD.

Carld
11-07-2009, 04:16 PM
That's good John. How about "join SH*T for exterminating drywall from China" as a moto.

dp
11-07-2009, 04:30 PM
I think if this is a final finding then the insurance companies and Chinese drywall mfgr's are off the hook. If so, who does that leave on the hook?

JCHannum
11-07-2009, 04:35 PM
The drywall manufacturers & insurance companies were not "on the hook" for potential health hazards involved with the dry wall. The problem cited was the corrosive effects of the dry wall.

dp
11-07-2009, 04:45 PM
The drywall manufacturers & insurance companies were not "on the hook" for potential health hazards involved with the dry wall. The problem cited was the corrosive effects of the dry wall.

A lot of people moved out of their homes citing the unlivable conditions there: rotten eggs smell, headaches, various ailments. Insurance claims were involved.

lazlo
11-07-2009, 04:50 PM
I think if this is a final finding then the insurance companies and Chinese drywall mfgr's are off the hook.

Did you read the article? The consensus of that Drywall Summit last week in Florida was that elemental sulfur was outgassing from the Chinese drywall and causing copper items to corrode. That's the rotten-egg smell.

The other consensus was that the outgassing sulfur did not pose a health risk.

So your house stinks, and it's eating your electrical wiring, plumbing and air conditioning, but it doesn't pose a health risk.

dp
11-07-2009, 04:58 PM
Did you read the article? The consensus of that Drywall Summit last week in Florida was that elemental sulfur was outgassing from the Chinese drywall and causing copper items to corrode. That's the rotten-egg smell.

The other consensus was that the outgassing sulfur did not pose a health risk.

So your house stinks, and it's eating your electrical wiring, plumbing and air conditioning, but it doesn't pose a health risk.

Which means people either default on their home loans or move back into the homes they abandoned. Not a good set of choices.

lazlo
11-07-2009, 05:33 PM
Which means people either default on their home loans or move back into the homes they abandoned. Not a good set of choices.

Sure, you're still screwed, but at least your health is apparently not at risk.

Evan
11-07-2009, 05:50 PM
So your house stinks, and it's eating your electrical wiring, plumbing and air conditioning, but it doesn't pose a health risk.


Of course that elemental sulphur may just be your driveway.

Note the bottom line on the analysis. That is total sulphur compounds including elemental sulphur. Note also that the particular Chinese sample was taken from a house with corrosion of the plumbing.

http://ixian.ca/pics6/dwall1.jpg