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View Full Version : Best Drill Chuck, 1/4" or Under



Paul Alciatore
11-16-2009, 03:30 AM
I want to get a really good quality drill chuck for use in the mill and possibly on the lathe tailstock if I can get an adaptor between MT2 and R8.

Anyway, anybody have any ideas as to which brand is best. I do not like keyless, so please spare me any keyless suggestions. I do want it to hold drills down to at least a #60. Somewhat less would be nice, but not a deal buster. If you suggest something that costs $500, please add a second best recomendation as that would clearly be out of my budget. And I am thinking new, not used.

Ken_Shea
11-16-2009, 08:41 AM
Paul, OK, I'm not suggestion any keyless chucks :), but am interested in why you are so apposed to them, unless you have not used a high quality keyless, then that would explain it.

Ed P
11-16-2009, 08:58 AM
http://www.yukiwa-usa.com/ikdc2/index.html

Dunc
11-16-2009, 09:19 AM
The standard - afaik - is the Albrecht but it is keyless. For keyed, Jacobs offer a variety of chucks that accept minimally "zero" diameter. There are others that accept 0.0135 drills (#80?). Not used any.

Another option might be the mini turbine handpieces (like a dentist's) that have a different chucking system but this would be a freehand arrangement short of fabricating a suitable drill press.

ammcoman2
11-16-2009, 09:36 AM
Jacobs 8 1/2 N ball bearing chuck is super accurate and drills never slip. Another contender would be a Jacobs 0 - 5/32" (number 0).

I have both and am very pleased with their performance.

Geoff

Mcgyver
11-16-2009, 09:56 AM
I used the smallest jacobs, I could check the number for you if you like, on my UPT and have been happy with it. It holds down to zero. I haven't' measured it but there is no descernable run out.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt/DSCN1177-large.jpg

lazlo
11-16-2009, 10:36 AM
I also have the Jacobs Number 0, and it's a very fine chuck.

Paul Alciatore
11-16-2009, 10:41 AM
Paul, OK, I'm not suggestion any keyless chucks :), but am interested in why you are so apposed to them, unless you have not used a high quality keyless, then that would explain it.

I have used keyless. First thing I don't like is they don't grip as tight. Second thing is they require more rotation to go from end to end.

And besides, you can't lose the key. Where's the fun in that?

Ken_Shea
11-16-2009, 11:02 AM
And besides, you can't lose the key. Where's the fun in that?

Ha-ha ain't that the truth.

Mcruff
11-16-2009, 11:42 AM
First thing I don't like is they don't grip as tight.

Heck my Albrecht will hold a 1/4" drill tighter than my Jacobs super chuck. In fact the harder you work an Albrecht the tighter it will get. I have had to use a pipe wrench on a couple occasion in the last 25 years to get a drill out of my 5/16" Albrecht chuck. If you used a Jacobs or Yuasa keyless you used a piece of crap compared to an Albrecht.

David S Newman
11-16-2009, 12:18 PM
I use an Albrecht 0 to 1/4 in my sensitive drill and can't fault it , super quality, super accurate and super expensive but you only get what you pay for !!!! David

lazlo
11-16-2009, 12:58 PM
super quality, super accurate and super expensive but you only get what you pay for !!!!

Seems that's been a theme here lately. Imagine that :p

TClarke
11-16-2009, 01:48 PM
Nothing wrong with a good quality BB keyless. Which brands did you use in past?

motorcyclemac
11-16-2009, 03:51 PM
Heck my Albrecht will hold a 1/4" drill tighter than my Jacobs super chuck. In fact the harder you work an Albrecht the tighter it will get. I have had to use a pipe wrench on a couple occasion in the last 25 years to get a drill out of my 5/16" Albrecht chuck. If you used a Jacobs or Yuasa keyless you used a piece of crap compared to an Albrecht.


Agreed. I have an Albrecht and an import keyless. Both are fine and will hold tighter than any keyed chuck I have. If you really want a keyless chuck tight.. Wrap a rag around it while you tighten it. Good luck getting it loose after that though. You'll need the rag again.

I have a keyed 0-1/2 Jacobs on my lathe. I would love to trade it for a keyless.

Cheers
Mac.

Carld
11-16-2009, 04:05 PM
Well, it's hard to beat the Jacobs ball bearing chucks and I need to get me a 0-1/4" too but I will use a strait arbor for mine.

Paul Alciatore
11-17-2009, 02:20 AM
Well, it's hard to beat the Jacobs ball bearing chucks and I need to get me a 0-1/4" too but I will use a strait arbor for mine.

OK, what do you mean by "straight arbor"? Is this literaly a straight shaft that is held in what? A collet? A mill holder?

Otherwise, it looks like many are saying an Albrecht keyless is top notch. I guess I will consider one if the price is right. But it still takes more turns to get where you are going.

Walter
11-17-2009, 02:50 AM
Paul,


Chuck arbors are available in many configurations, including R8, Morse, and straight. I have a wonderful Rhom keyless thats on an R8, and another on a 3/4 inch straight arbor, they are held in collets. Albrecht's are top quality and you'll be hard pressed to do better. Rhom's are very nice. I had a phase II keyless that had awesome gripping power, but it lived on the lathe and I don't know about concentricity.

Ken_Shea
11-17-2009, 08:17 AM
Since Paul's aversion to keyless chucks has lessened :D

Worth considering are these from an advertiser here.
Includes a spanner wrench as well.
A hard to believe .0002 TIR gripping concentricity

http://www.glacern.com/drill_chucks


EDIT: No 1/4" :(

Paul Alciatore
11-17-2009, 10:42 AM
Since Paul's aversion to keyless chucks has lessened :D

Worth considering are these from an advertiser here.
Includes a spanner wrench as well.
A hard to believe .0002 TIR gripping concentricity

http://www.glacern.com/drill_chucks


EDIT: No 1/4" :(

Interesting line. They have a 1/64" - 1/2" which would certainly cover the small end quite well. But it would probably be about as big as the 1/2" I currently have so would not address the "space under the spindle" thing as well as a 1/4" would. The integeral shanks probably add to the accuracy as well as help the cost factor.

But one has to wonder if they grip so well, then why do they include a spanner?

BobWarfield
11-17-2009, 11:37 AM
Lathemaster also has very nice keyless chucks.

When I saw you wanted one for less than 1/4", keyless was my thought. Above about 3/8" and certainly 1/2", I prefer keyed precisely because the keyless tighten up as you work them hard. I too have had the experience of needing a pipe wrench to losten one after a big Silver and Deming did its job.

Also, on the tailstock, it's really nice to be able to change bits without digging for the chuck key (though I used a welder's magnet to keep the key close by when I had a Jacobs on my tailstock).

Cheers,

BW

Mike Nash
11-17-2009, 11:44 AM
Just because I haven't seen it mentioned, I'll point out that the keyless chucks I have are far longer than the keyed. It can be a deal breaker on something like an X2 mini-mill setup, never mind a mini-lathe.

fasto
11-17-2009, 12:45 PM
But one has to wonder if they grip so well, then why do they include a spanner?

The spanner is needed to *loosen* the chuck, as the self-tightening effect is pretty impressive.

Also, don't bottom the drill bit in a self-tightening keyless chuck or it'll be a real bear to get open!