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Turbo
02-03-2002, 05:50 PM
Given the same money and you can only buy one saw for the home shop, which will it be and why? Bandsaw or Abrasive cut-off saw? Thanks, Greg

Dave Burnett
02-03-2002, 07:14 PM
Bandsaw

bdarin
02-03-2002, 08:15 PM
Bandsaw.

Thrud
02-03-2002, 08:55 PM
Abrasive cut off will harden the cut even in mild or cold rolled (low carbon steels). The band saw has another advantage - you can cut a notch in plate or structural steel easier than with an abrasive chop saw. Band saws blades seldom explode - unlike chop saws.

A cold cut saw is better IMO, but quite expensive. Go for the band saw.

Dave

ralph mitchell
02-04-2002, 08:38 PM
Bandsaw. Its a lot cleaner and less chance of fire. I got a 4x6 for about 200$. Its great for home use. I sold my chopsaw.

mike thomas
02-04-2002, 09:26 PM
I use my chop saw to smallerize the 20' chunks the steel distributor drops off in the drive. It is great for that, even though I set the landscaping on fire last year. Wish I had a band saw for inside. One day. Mike

MarshSt
02-04-2002, 11:26 PM
Bandsaw Getting by on the chop saw, but what a pain with the noise and sparks. The 4x6 imports (next tool on the wish list)work pretty well as long as you use good quality (Lenox etc.) blades. Don't use the results of the supplied-with-the-saw blades to judge the saw.

Steve

farmwrench
02-05-2002, 11:46 AM
I just got one of those cheepo band saws(used but only once maybe), after years with a chop saw. I foolishly didn't make notes on the web sites that consider the imports a "semi-finnished" product. The only thing chops saws have that bands dont is portability, and the ability to make that fire extingisher look like a great deal after all.

bspooh
02-05-2002, 01:36 PM
Bandsaw...all the way..I have both...I use the chopsaw for small dia.'s, because with a bandsaw, you need to have 3-5 teeth engaged in the material that you're cutting at all times..smaller diameters pose a problem to a bandsaw blade by chipping the teeth..Chopsaws are great, but you can't do aluminum, and sparks are only fun on 4th of July....

brent

KACHINKOO
02-05-2002, 04:52 PM
GENTLEMAN, I HAVE AN OLD WALKER 16 INCH BANDSAW STEEPED UP TO TURN 5400 FPM.THIS BABY HUMS AT HYPERSPEED. CUTS SS UP TO .5 THICK VERY NICELY, MOST TUBING LIKE BUTTER AND THINNER PLATE EFFORTLESLY.QUITE A FEW MARINE FAB SHOPS IN THE AREA DO THE SAME PRACTICE AND WE ALL HAVE THE SAME LUCK!

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Thrud
02-06-2002, 01:59 AM
Brent;

If you want to chopsaw Aluminum, any good wood chopsaw will work if you use an ATB Carbide blade AND CLAMP IT WITH EXTREME PREDJUDICE TO THE BED OF THE SAW! You really do not want the piece to squirm while cutting it - that would be real bad! Commercial saws for Aluminum use hydraulic or air cylinders to clamp the work on both side of the cut (both horizontal and vertical planes). You can cut with about the same speed as you would Maple or Oak. You can cut it dry, suds are not required. DO NOT TRY THIS WITH FERROUS METALS OR COPPER- A COLD SAW SHOULD BE USED FOR THESE!!!

Dave

ralph mitchell
02-08-2002, 07:55 PM
You can get chopsaw blades for aluminum. I didnt use my chow saw very much, but i liked the aluminum blade for metal because it broke down faster and didnt load up.

mike thomas
02-09-2002, 01:32 AM
On another thread, I mentioned stumbling into a bandsaw. It is a 4x6. It is home now, Asian, the guy I got it from thought that an American name meant an American saw. Still $50 delivered and not used much. How about some recommendations on blade brands and types. Mike

PJames02
02-10-2002, 01:30 AM
Bandsaw, I've got a taiwanese 4 x 6, it's great especially with some easy mods to make it more user friendly. Fit better quality blades too.

Tree
02-10-2002, 07:37 AM
If you're cutting a lot of aluminum or pieces with any thickness to them, it makes a big difference if you use a lubricant. Stick wax is probably the most common "dry" lubricant for this purpose-it gets a little messy but it gives you a smoother cut and increases your feed rate. This really makes a difference when cutting sheet or plate on the tablesaw. I've found that I like a product made by DoAll called Toolsaver-it's not quite as messy as stick wax and seems to work better. I think it was about 6 or 7 dollars last time I bought it.

roberlt
02-10-2002, 09:33 PM
Blade type is up to what you are cutting. Natch, 4in thick alum. will be diffrent than 24ga. mild steel.
Brand? If you want GOOD use Starrett,on my saw usually outlast cheap carbon steel by at least 4:1 and since they don't cost anywhere near 4 times as much, I figure I come out ahead.

Rob

Thrud
02-10-2002, 11:32 PM
robert
I will have to agree with the Starrett blades. They are good. Sandvik, Lenox, DoAll, they also make superb blades. I like the structured tooth carbide by Starrett - but way, way, not reasonable.

Dave

mike thomas
02-14-2002, 06:18 PM
I appreciate your comments on the blades. My first inclination would have been Starrett, however on another board, their hacksaw blades were getting ripped pretty badly. Those objecting did not make sense to me, as it seemed more like mob mentality than legitimate complaints. The Starretts are not too expensive, and are readily available. I'll include some in the next order.
The saw seems to be in great shape. It appears as if the previous owner, upon noticing that it was cutting crooked, adjusted it with a couple of six packs. Mike

SGW
02-14-2002, 06:42 PM
I don't think you have to worry about the quality of Starrett blades. I would sooner suspect the problem was with the person using them.

Thrud
02-14-2002, 10:34 PM
mike,
When the blade starts to cut crooked what has happened is the "set" has been stripped off on the side the blade wanders towards. Always start a new blade on the opposite (flip the piece over) side of an exsisting cut - it will damage the "set" if started in a previous cut.

Dave

mike thomas
02-14-2002, 10:38 PM
SGW, Agreed. Dave, good tip, thanks. Mike

lynnl
02-15-2002, 10:59 AM
Thrud, Ref your comment: "...what has happened is the "set" has been stripped off on the side the blade wanders towards..."

Didn't you mean '...the side the blade wanders AWAY FROM?' i.e. The cut will be more aggressive on the side with more set.

Lynn

Thrud
02-16-2002, 12:12 AM
Lynn

You are right, it wanders towards the side with set or away from the stripped side. I am glad you corrected me - I certainly do not want to lead anyone astray (or off to the side with set, as it were). I guess I owe you a beer(root!) now too.

Dave

John McGlynn
02-16-2002, 04:43 AM
I have used a chop saw for many years now, mostly cutting 20mm RHS and small angle sections. I recently mounted an on/off switch on the smoke detector to use while cutting.
I bought a wood bandsaw and modified it with a 50:1 gear train to cut metal. It has been tracking badly lately, the reason for which I have found out by reading these replies.
I don't cut much aluminium (it's too expensive in Oz)but when I do it's the bandsaw every time.
I guess if you are cutting large sections in steel then a chop saw is the answer. Anything else will be better with a bandsaw.

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spope14
02-16-2002, 12:48 PM
Bandsaw. I have both. By the way, buy the good blades - Starrett or Lennox. The cheapos are just that. I have a bandsaw, chop, and horiz cutoff saw. Used to go through the cheapo blades like crazy - both the pre-weld and the 50 foot roll weld-em up blades, thought I was saving money. Finally got the inclination after going through about 15 blades a year (school shop)to spend the money for a trio of good Starret pre-welded blades, and two good Lennox blades (I will state i am a very good blade welder by all accounts from others), I have only replaced two blades in five years since (opertor malfunction).

Check your SFPM for the material and calculate your blade speed appropriately. A big fault of many bandsaw users is to run the thing full out like a wood saw. Also buy blades according to material. Will cost more in the short run, but the blades will last years if handled right.

Also, buy yourself a good V-Block and clamp set-up for cutting round stock. Nothing strips teeth like a spinning piece of round stock, especially when the stock is half cut thru and decides to do the hokey pokey. Add a piece of 1 x 4 to push with, notch it on one side with a "V" for odd stuff.

Too much info I am sure, but this is from 15 years of teaching experience, and having my theroys student tested (which is like having the rhinos using your gear).

Turbo
02-16-2002, 09:16 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Turbo:
Given the same money and you can only buy one saw for the home shop, which will it be and why? Bandsaw or Abrasive cut-off saw? Thanks, Greg</font>

I appreciate all the feedback to my original post. I learned the answer to my question plus tons more I didn't know I needed to know. Thanks to all for your input. Greg