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View Full Version : Fire Brick for OxyAcetylene Welding?



pgmrdan
10-10-2003, 10:07 AM
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[This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-19-2004).]

wierdscience
10-10-2003, 10:27 AM
Yes,refractory fire brick,McMaster-Carr sells them,they are cheap for what they do $4.25 I think,you can also saw,stack and rack them up into a neat heat treat or metal melting furnace for cheap.
OOPS!They went up.
http://www.mcmaster.com
page 3235

[This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 10-10-2003).]

wierdscience
10-10-2003, 10:46 AM
Here's a neat one-

http://www.jamesriser.com/Machinery/GasForge/PropaneForge.html

[This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 10-10-2003).]

jfsmith
10-10-2003, 11:19 AM
Refractory brick is great, but I also use the firebox type of brick, much denser and heavier, and I think I pay less than a buck for each one.


Jerry

pgmrdan
10-10-2003, 11:33 AM
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[This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 11-16-2003).]

wierdscience
10-10-2003, 08:27 PM
Well the price is a little steep,but you ain't gonna need three thousand of them either.
Don't get me wrong.the lumberyard variety will work,just don't ever let them get wet,any moisture will convert to steam that means a chance of the brick fracturing after its hot-ouch!

They will also sometimes stick to things when hot.

There is a matter of performance in certain operations,the refractory works better for heat treating and brazing because it refracts the heat back into the workpiece,where the common fire brick only insulates heat away from undesireable places i.e. wood walls.

The refractory will also hold heat for things like heatreating small thin sectioned parts,I make on a regular basis some dies for cutting rubber,the cross section is only 1/16" thick,too much time is required to use a furnace and just holding under a rosebud tip ruins the part,so what I do is setup three bricks in a vee shape,put high heat into the bricks with the torch,then place the dies in the vee,the result is far and wide better than anything my compition can make and lots cheaper.

[This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 10-10-2003).]

CCWKen
10-11-2003, 01:05 AM
You can also make your own bricks from refractory mix... or just coat your fireplace brick with it. The stuff I got to line my furnace (inner layer) was a little high $ but it's good to about 3200*F.

Option 2: Forget the brick and build yourself a nice welding table. A lower tray of sand works good. Make it so that you can slide the tray out. (Makes it easy to find those bolts and tools that drop through once in a while)

pgmrdan
10-11-2003, 09:36 AM
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[This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 11-16-2003).]

brunneng
10-11-2003, 07:57 PM
As per making a welding table. Do mean one of those where you have an arrangement of thin steel cross pieces on edge so that it looks like a large screen mesh? Maybe 2-4" gaps.
Or a solid steel plate?
Got a picture?

Houw about laying out the firebricks and then putting a refractory coating over them to level everything out and leave a nice smooth surface.

pgmrdan
10-11-2003, 09:40 PM
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[This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 11-16-2003).]

CCWKen
10-11-2003, 10:24 PM
Once you get going and want to jig something up, you'll wonder why you bought the bricks. I use square tubing for stand-offs. Another reason for having a "grate" table is that you can clamp things down just about anywhere and everywhere. This helps a lot with A/O -- less warping. Works even better for electric welding. Ground goes to table, weld anywhere.

Forgot to mention, get at least 3/16 x 1" thick GRATING. You can get this at most steel suppliers. It comes in 12, 24 and 36 inch widths in lengths up to 20/24'. You need this if you're going to clamp things down to the table. If you use expanded metal, you'll need a lot of reinforcment or cross bars to clamp to. This limits your clamping options.


[This message has been edited by CCWKen (edited 10-11-2003).]

brunneng
10-13-2003, 05:57 PM
I was wondering about the expanded metal, as I have a sheet of that and I was going to use it as the table bottom with angle iron cross-pieces to support it.
I didn't know you could get grating thick like that.

The problem with the fire bricks I have is that they are not perfectly square and flat, or sized. I was thinking of trying to flatten, square and size then but that seems like a lot of work.