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davidwdyer
12-15-2009, 07:02 AM
I am planning a little project and need a little advice about chains and sprockets.

I plan to buy the sprockets from McMaster instead of making them
because it seems fast and easy.

However, there seem to be quite a few options.

I want something like a bicycle chain, but there are ANSI and ISO types. What is the difference?

Also, what "number" of chain would be equivalent to a bicycle chain?

Any help would be appreciated. I've never worked with chains and sprockets before.:confused:

winchman
12-15-2009, 07:23 AM
Did you look at the MCMaster-Carr page about chain? Put "roller chain" in the find box, and click on "About Roller Chain".

IIRC bicycle chain is #40 or 1/2" pitch.

Roger

EVguru
12-15-2009, 07:26 AM
I want something like a bicycle chain, but there are ANSI and ISO types. What is the difference?

Here are a couple of useful sites.

http://www.gizmology.net/sprockets.htm

http://www.sprocketsunlimited.com/Chainspecifications.html


A real wierd one is 219 which is used on racing Karts. It was invented by one of the Japanese chain companies and is 7.35mm pitch.

gbritnell
12-15-2009, 07:34 AM
David, roller chain whether ISO or ANSI is just measurements, width, pitches and pin diameters. It just depends on what you're building and how much load you're going to apply to the chain. McMaster lists all the loads and sizes on their site.
gbritnell

Evan
12-15-2009, 08:21 AM
You want chain and sprockets this is the place. Good to deal with too.

http://www.electricscooterparts.com/sprockets.html#fw

wierdscience
12-15-2009, 08:51 AM
#40 is the closest pitch (pin to pin distance)to bicycle chain you can get,except for #41 which is narrower and less common in terms of sprockets.Either is stronger than bike chain.

ANSI roller chain is the way to go,the ISO stuff is the same pitch,just more expensive here so why spend more money?Funny,the supposedly metric chain is inch demension expressed in metric units:D

http://mechanical-components.globalspec.com/Specifications/Motion_Controls/Power_Transmission_Mechanical/Chain_Roller

Surplus center sells weld sprokects and hubs.They are a two piece affair where you buy the hub you want (round keyed,square,hex,splined) and the sprocket you want and weld them together.The only draw back is there is a limit as to the minimum tooth count.

https://www.surpluscenter.com/sort.asp?UID=2009121507454822&catname=powerTrans&byKeyword=yes&search=WELD40

davidwdyer
12-15-2009, 09:23 AM
Thanks for all the help guys.

I think I can get it from here.

I need something with a 1 inch inner diameter bore and a 6:1 gear ratio between the two sprockets.

The larger sprocket cannot be more than 13 inches and preferably smaller.

barts
12-15-2009, 11:28 AM
If you want the drive to last a while, get more than the minimum in the small sprocket... 6:1 is at the limit of what you can do. I've used Horstman-style split aluminum sprockets designed for go-karts; they work well aside from very dusty environments.

http://www.bmikarts.com/shop/?shop=1&cat=171

I'd recommend 14 x 84 w/ #35 chain if that fits and handles the torque.
#25 chain is not nearly as strong, but works ok for lower loads and will be much smaller.

If this is machinery running for a lot of hours under much load, you'll want steel sprockets and drip lubrication. 6:1 is too much in a single pass w/o really large sprockets

camdigger
12-15-2009, 11:29 AM
1" bores and 6:1 ratio will be hard to get and still stay within the 13" maximum diameter. There will be a minimum # of teeth on the pinion (depending on chain size) probly around 8 or 10 for 35 to 40 chain to get a 1" shaft through. That means to get the ratio you want, you'll need 48 to 60 teeth in the larger sprocket (depending on which pinion you can use.)

EVguru
12-15-2009, 11:45 AM
Some of the Kart back axle sprockets are available in plastic. You might want to look into 219 or 1/4" pitch.

Before anyone laughs, I'd point out that Laverda successfully used them for endurance racing on the 1000cc tripples.

With a metal sprocket, you're only loading one or two teeth, whilst with the plastic sprocket the heavily loaded teeth deflect enough to spread the load to adjacent teeth. They run quieter and chain life can be increased becuase dirt isn't being ground between two hard surfaces.

They were sold for a while for road use, but if the chain hasn't been maintained it can run hot and soften the plastic and strip the teeth.

Black_Moons
12-15-2009, 05:25 PM
Plastic chain.. Never woulda thought it any good. Shows how much I know.

PS id really worry about using modren bicycle chain... When I was a kid I never remember my chain snaping.... These days iv driven past multiple kids with clearly broken chains, and im talking like 14 year olds, they can't exactly be puting that much force on the chain.. and as for maintence.. I had bikes sit in the rain for years, rode em and they still never snaped, at worst you'd get a couple links rusted togethor.. so I don't think its that kids these days are not oiling them..
Even asked one or two of em and they tell me there chain brakes all the time.
#40 and #41 chain is WAYYY stronger and heavyer.

pcarpenter
12-15-2009, 05:31 PM
Uh....check that again...he said plastic *sprocket*:D

Paul

Willy
12-15-2009, 05:34 PM
Not plastic chain.

Plastic sprockets.
But yes the stuff can be pretty good. Nylon sprockets have been in use for automotive timing sprockets for decades, very quiet as well as durable.

madman
12-15-2009, 07:53 PM
I had one on a 1000 cc Bike years ago, it lasted for a little while and then i had teeth vanish.

psomero
12-15-2009, 07:56 PM
yes bicycle stuff is #40 or sometimes #410

if you're looking for something similar to bicycle chain, just go buy a kmc z510hx or 410H chain from your local bike store.

they can't be beat in price to strength

psomero
12-15-2009, 08:02 PM
Plastic chain.. Never woulda thought it any good. Shows how much I know.

PS id really worry about using modren bicycle chain... When I was a kid I never remember my chain snaping.... These days iv driven past multiple kids with clearly broken chains, and im talking like 14 year olds, they can't exactly be puting that much force on the chain.. and as for maintence.. I had bikes sit in the rain for years, rode em and they still never snaped, at worst you'd get a couple links rusted togethor.. so I don't think its that kids these days are not oiling them..
Even asked one or two of em and they tell me there chain brakes all the time.
#40 and #41 chain is WAYYY stronger and heavyer.



bike chains are a prime example of you get what you pay for. KMC makes the only chains that are worth a damn. their z510hx is the only chain i have never broken after over three years of use and i used to buy chains for my bmx bikes two or three at a time at least once a month.

i've tried using whatever "heavy duty" #410 chain that mcmaster stocks and it's massively inferior to the kmc chain. most bicycle stores who can order from quality bike products (almost any bike shop) can order kmc chains for you...