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View Full Version : OT: need a temporary ghetto rig CV boot repair



beanbag
12-26-2009, 10:04 PM
Found out yesterday that one of the front wheel CV boots on my car split open and sprayed grease everywhere. It's an accordian-type boot and broke in half along the inside crease of one of the ridges. There's still grease on the joint and it doesn't make clicking noises yet, so it might still be salvageable. I'm looking for a good temporary way to seal up the joint until I can get a replacement axle or boot. I was thinking of wrapping a layer or two of cloth over it and cinch it down on both sides. The advantage of cloth being that it is very soft and will let the joint bend.

Any other ideas?

Oh yeah, it just started raining today.

I looked at one of those universal split boot kits, and it seems too big and clunky for my car.

On a slightly longer time scale, I was thinking of getting used but OEM axles. I've read that for Honda/Acura axles, you really don't want the re-manufactured aftermarket axles. So I figured that as long as I got a used set that didn't have the boots ripped yet and didn't click, then it should be ok, right? Worst case is a little backlash or looseness? Then I would have an extra set of axles around and I could take my time to properly repair one of the sets with a new boot, and use the other one as a CNC 4.5 axis device.

darryl
12-26-2009, 10:30 PM
I think you could get by with a cloth strip- if you can clean the boot really well, you could stick the cloth to it with shoo goo or goop. A fairly short piece of cloth can be made to conform to the curve well enough. Maybe apply a couple of strips, overlapping if needed.

MotorradMike
12-26-2009, 10:32 PM
#1
On the quick fix 'cause you need the car now thing. I've put Saran wrap and ty-wraps on an axle and run it 800kM including very dusty roads and got away with it. That was when I was re-building them myself. And to be honest, that really only meant new boot, clean and repack grease.

#2
Now that I don't do that anymore, I find the 'swap for rebuilt' shops are a very good deal. I've done this with VW and Toyota driveshafts and can not see any reason Honda/Acura would be different.

Mike

914Wilhelm
12-26-2009, 10:50 PM
They make split boots for repairs. Check your local FLAPS.

Mark Hockett
12-27-2009, 01:09 AM
Why not just replace the boot. I do Honda's in 1.5 hours they are very easy. If you don't have a torque wrench that will go high enough you can get around it by marking to position of the axle nut to the axle with a chisel. When you tighten the nut just align the marks and you are good.

boslab
12-27-2009, 01:54 AM
Not sure how you guys manage over yonder but over here most folk change thier own due to the cost of garages, we have wrap rounds, a moulded split like a cliplock bag, comes with a packet of lithium grease, 2 tywraps, one long one short and a tube of slowish superglue, also included is a pair of latex gloves, these arent my favourite but if your spanner shy they do the job.
i have seen someone split a universal and wrap it round, reglue with superglue and repack but its life is short.
I regularly use strechys, universal CV joint covers that are capable of streching, this requires the nut or bolt holding the short end to be removed, shaft popped out then the replacement CV cover is slif up a greased cone inside out then popped over the joint, repack and tywrap with stainless wraps. easy but a little dirty, i usually change the break pads same time.
if your split in the wilderness washing up gloves make a quick keep the dirt out grease in, your supposed to use EP grease like molibdinum disulphide but anything will do in an emergency, even tapping compound [without the swarf!] to keep the joint clean more than anything as they tend towards expensive, a Burlington ball [5 ball] CV for an Audi over here is about $250 and the same plus vat to get it fitted! [hence DIY]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F17tFS6ofzU
mark

John Stevenson
12-27-2009, 07:08 AM
Run over two or three homeless persons, it's surprising what gets wrapped round the drive shafts and is a bitch to get off .

.

SteveF
12-27-2009, 07:32 AM
So I figured that as long as I got a used set that didn't have the boots ripped yet and didn't click, then it should be ok, right?

Well, is your boot old and failed because of age (> 10 years) or is it fairly new (under 5) and failed because it hit something? If it failed because of age, getting a used one of similar age to replace it means you are just going to have to replace that one in the near future. Rubber ages, hardens and fails. Sounds like you need to get a new boot kit.

Steve.

Highpower
12-27-2009, 07:49 AM
Run over two or three homeless persons, it's surprising what gets wrapped round the drive shafts and is a bitch to get off . Really? http://blog.cardomain.com/2008/12/17/heres-why-you-should-never-run-over-a-mattress/ :D (http://blog.cardomain.com/2008/12/17/heres-why-you-should-never-run-over-a-mattress/)

Being a retired dealer tech, I can tell you this:

1) Don't waste your time and money on a "split boot".
2) A rag wrapped around your torn C.V. boot? Seriously? Go with the Saran Wrap.... :p
3) Aftermarket boots or re-manufactured axles will work - for awhile. But they don't fit very well. Factory Honda parts will last longer and be a lot easier to install.

NiftyNev
12-27-2009, 08:54 AM
They are called split boots for more than one reason. Tried one once, they are crap.

Nev

JoeFin
12-27-2009, 10:03 AM
Correction - thats "Getto Buggy" not Getto Rig

RTPBurnsville
12-27-2009, 11:47 AM
Tried the split boot on a 95 Accord but would never try that again. The boots I used were the right size for the car. The plastic wrap idea will likely get you just as far down the road with much less mess and effort. I ended up driving a clicking CV joint for 2-3 years then sold the car so no idea if its still going or not. I see no reason why rebuild shafts would not work, just make sure you hang onto your originals until after you install and test the rebuilts. I like fixing most anything other than cars, good luck.

JTToner
12-27-2009, 12:22 PM
Gehetto fix - that would be duct tape, but it only counts if you steal the tape :D

barts
12-27-2009, 03:23 PM
Forget the split boot trick... but gaffer tape works really well on jobs like this if you can get the grease off the outside of the boot. It's strictly a get-it-home kind of "repair", but if the joint gets grit in it you get to buy a new one so it's worth a try.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaffer_tape

The big advantage of this stuff is that the adhesive doesn't soften under heat (stage lights, for example); this means it works in many places when duct tape fails (getting more miles out of a torn motorcycle seat, for example).

- Bart

YukonHam
12-27-2009, 10:49 PM
Some years ago a fellow northerner got through in a pinch using an old [small] pair of jeans. Cut them off so that he could use a couple of hose clamps to close the top and bottom. Clipped the fly so it could open up completely, filled with grease, wrapped around the old boot and zipped it up. Lasted until the weather improved enough to fix it right.

Ken_Shea
12-27-2009, 11:01 PM
#1
On the quick fix 'cause you need the car now thing. I've put Saran wrap and ty-wraps on an axle and run it 800kM
Mike

Now, short of fixing it proper, there is just nothing wrong with that idea, thought I'd heard them all till now.

ahidley
12-27-2009, 11:32 PM
The down and dirty way is a GARBAGE BAG and ZIP TIES. Youd be supprised how long it'll stay on............ Dont ask how I know.

saltmine
12-28-2009, 12:19 AM
A set of "previously owned" half-shafts might not be a stellar idea.

Of course, if you're a gambler, the odds are 50-50 you'll get a shaft that's not worse than the ones you already have.

My take on the problem would be to go to Honda,and get a pair of boots (yes they are available) and the correct grease. Changing the boots is a fairly straight forward job.....Heck, you might even be able to get one of those WyoTech graduates to do it for about $100....
As long as the joints themselves aren't damaged...or worn out, change the boots.

I know a guy with a Nissan who thought he would save a few bucks by installing used shafts. His biggest goof was having somebody install them for him. By the time he got a pair of marginally better half-shafts, the labor he paid would have paid for a couple of brand new ones.

BTW, split boots are completely useless.....Don't even think about it.

andy_b
12-28-2009, 12:48 AM
My wife's VW Passat was just at the dealers and they mentioned the left out CV boot is torn. It isn't clicking yet. The repair manager asked me if I wanted it replaced and I told him no. I'll just run it until the balls get loose and then pop a new stub axle in. No sense wasting money if it is still working. :)

When I worked at a small VW garage we'd have guys bringing their cars in with CVs not only missing boots, but balls gone as well. Those "split boot repair boots" are junk. They are good for garages though if the garage can find someone dumb enough to pay to have one put on. That way the mechanic can get all of the bolts loose when putting the split boot on so it is easier to put the new CV on the following week when the split boot goes flying off while driving down the highway.

andy b.

saltmine
12-28-2009, 01:21 AM
I like the one suggestion about running over "homeless people"

With a "twist".

In the area where I live, run over tweakers and dopers.

That will accomplish two things....one, it will eliminate the worthless SOB's, and two, it will protect your CVs until you have time to fix it...or run over some more tweakers...or dopers.

motorcyclemac
12-28-2009, 02:02 AM
Here is your no joke ghetto repair for the CV joint.

Get 3-4 cans of carburetor spray cleaner, 2 rolls of duct tape or similar, a roll of shrink wrap used for packaging (preferably the 6" wide size), a tube of black moly grease and a grease gun.

Lift the front of the car. Remove the last of the ripped boot. Using wire cutters remove the steel bands that retained the boot. Liberally hose carb cleaner into the joint to remove all contaminated grease. Use 3 full cans to assure that the joint is fully flushed. wait for the joint to dry. Mean while insert the tube of moly in a grease gun. Turn the front wheels hard to one side.. Use the grease gun and pump liberal volumes of grease into the joint. A needle grease attachment helps here. Make sure that joint is fully packed from that side. Repeat with the wheels turned the other way. Once the joint is full wrap the exposed joint with several layers of shrink wrap packing plastic. This will assist in keeping the grease in the joint. Do not put the shrink wrap on the outside of the CV cup. Once the shrink wrap is applied..then use rag and some carb cleaner from the 4th can. Wipe the CV cup clean to assure that it will allow good adhesion with the duct tape. Repeat the same on the axle. Now take the duct tape and wrapthe entire CV cup...over the shrink wrap and work your way down on the axle. Commence to put BOTH rolls on the joint. Make a big gob of tape to cover the joint. Go from the cup down on the axle for about 10-12 inches. Make a big tapered tape wad that will allow for flex.

This is by no means a permanent solution but we did this very thing to a co-worker's car. He wanted to make it to pay day and have it fixed. He ended up driving it for 3 months that way.

Cheers
Mac.

beanbag
12-28-2009, 04:31 PM
Just an update:
Yesterday, I made the "repair" with some cloth and a zip tie and some dental floss because I didn't have a second zip tie.
Today, I found out that the dental floss end came undone.
So I said, "screw it, time to do things properly".

So I put a zip tie on the other end too. :p

Failing that, I have a trash bag ready...

Ken_Shea
12-28-2009, 05:54 PM
Just an update:
Yesterday, I made the "repair" with some cloth and a zip tie and some dental floss because I didn't have a second zip tie.
Today, I found out that the dental floss end came undone.
So I said, "screw it, time to do things properly".

So I put a zip tie on the other end too. :p

Failing that, I have a trash bag ready...

There you go, it's always best to it right the first time :D

KDuffy
12-28-2009, 10:26 PM
Just be sure to trim the ends of the Zip ties, that will make a noise! May have been in on a gag once, 4 or five big ones on a drive shaft will make a racket!

Peter S
12-29-2009, 06:33 AM
Aftermarket CV joints are now so cheap, it is not worth doing anything but replace the whole thing, in my opinion. I did a Ford Telstar (i.e. Mazda 626) recently, about US$65 for an outer CV joint, it comes with new nut, boot, grease. They are quite a piece of work for this price, some nice grinding work goes into their manufacture. I think CV re-man. places would struggle to survive now a days.

One of the problems I have removing an outer CV joint is the big nut. I guess you need a rattle gun, I don't have one, so cut the old nut off with a cutting disc and angle grinder. It is all pretty straightforward, except when you are an idiot and put the new CV joint on without fitting the new boot first :o ....and of course the replacement CV joint wouldn't come off the shaft easily like the old one did (drawbacks of after market parts?). So I had to cut the new joint off and buy another one....:(

Previous occasion, same car, my introduction to CV joints, I tried removing one of those big CV nuts and I gave my self a black eye using a 1/2" socket set (largest I had to hand). Hence the angle grinder, and one reason why they give you a new nut in the box!

BTW, cable ties for holding the boot don't work on some cars like my VW - the large diameter is so close to the suspension strut you need the low-profile original stainless strap type to clear, no problem easy to get.

charlz
12-29-2009, 09:53 AM
My only issue with just replacing the boot is that you pull the axle out anyway... so why not just replace the whole axle? If your boot is torn or gone your CV joint is likely contaminated with dirt, sand or road salt anyway. I replaced one on my wife's Accord using an aftermarket axle from Autohauz AZ and it looked just like the one I pulled out.

vpt
12-29-2009, 11:30 AM
Honda sells the boots new at the dealership. They even have axle rebuild kits that come with grease, tranny clips, etc. You can get cups, shafts, tribearings, everything right from honda.


It is a simple procedure. Pull the axle out, put the shaft of the axle in a vise, beat the cup/tribearing off with a hammer, install new boot, hammer cup/tribearing back on shaft, install boot clamps, reinstall axle.

Not sure which honda you have or year but most will lose some tranny fluid if it is the pass. side axle, if it is the drivers side axle there is a very good the axle goes into a half shaft and there will be no tranny fluid loss.

The most fluid you should lose is about a 1/4 quart. Just pop off the breather cap on top the tranny, stick in a funnel, and refill with SAE30 for manual tranny, atf for auto.


Good luck.

Mark Hockett
12-29-2009, 11:36 AM
My only issue with just replacing the boot is that you pull the axle out anyway... so why not just replace the whole axle? If your boot is torn or gone your CV joint is likely contaminated with dirt, sand or road salt anyway. I replaced one on my wife's Accord using an aftermarket axle from Autohauz AZ and it looked just like the one I pulled out.
If all the grease did not leak out and the joint is still OK the factory joint is a far better unit. We have installed hundreds of the Chinese aftermarket axles from manufacturers such as Empi and Cardone, they are inexpensive but total crap. We have had a 20% failure rate with them. When the customer is given the option of a factory axle or aftermarket they pick the aftermarket because of the price. Because they are so cheap they put most of the quality axle rebuilders out of business so that is not an option anymore.