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View Full Version : Geez, I guess my shop's gonna be dead for a bit.



DICKEYBIRD
12-27-2009, 12:33 PM
I promised SWMBO a while back our Christmas gift to each other this year would be a big screen TV. She's been wanting one for years since the biggest one in the house was a 25" Hitachi I've had since 1986 and I finally agreed to get a big screen this year.

Holy Cow....I didn't have a clue what the experience would be like with a quality 50" HD TV! I upgraded the cable box to HD as well and I can't seem to walk away from it to get anything done in the workshop since we got the darned thing. It's absolutely awesome to watch HD movies or stuff like the New Yankee Workshop and documentary programs on the Science or Nat Geo channels. We watched the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame concerts on the "On Demand" channel and I was simply blown away. It's (for me) as good as, if not better than, being there in person. I can see now what the HD hoopla is all about!:D

After the new wears off, I'm sure I'll be back to doing "real" things but for a while it looks like I'll be saving energy money by not heating up the shop.;)

Carld
12-27-2009, 12:42 PM
Yep, about 6 months ago I got a measly 42" HD tv and wow :eek: is it great or what. After about 30 minutes of watching I wish I had gotten a 48" 0r 50" but the 42" was about as big as I could fit in where the old 26" from 1988 was. Now the old one is in the shop with a converter box. We are on an antenna with an antenna rotor and I refuse to go cable or dish even though I would love to have it. I just refuse to pay for all the channels I have no desire to watch plus you pay for cable and still have the advertisements in the shows.

If cable was add free I would get it.

aboard_epsilon
12-27-2009, 12:53 PM
there is supposed to be another format coming out or something ..weather its here or not now i don't know

what i was told that what you have now is backlit LCD......With a lifespan of 5 years ..and many TV repair places unable to fix them once the backlights bugger up ..too costly

whats coming out is LED with no backlights with hopefully a good lifespan.

my own TV is CRT..probably more than twenty years old now ..and still going strong....... i ain't buying anything until this packs up ..
anyway in our country if you want to watch HD channels you got to pay for them .that's something I'm never going to do .heck id have no money left for my hobbies if i did ..

all the best.markj

John Stevenson
12-27-2009, 12:54 PM
We have a funny system over here, TV isn't free and you have to pay a licence fee which goes to the BBC.

They have 4 main channels plus a few extra news etc
The bulk of the channels is made up from other companies who fund their programs by advertising, advertising is banned on the BBC other than program previews.

Even if you only watch the other channels you still have to have a license as it cunningly worded "To receive TV transmissions " or such like.

However after being at my daughters over Christmas and watching some programs on cable I got really pissed with all the adverts every 15 minutes that lasted another 5 minutes and always the same ones, over and over.

At least with the Beeb you get an hours long program with no bloody adverts.

.

lynnl
12-27-2009, 01:00 PM
We got a 42" HD a couple of years ago, but my cable provider (Mediacom) wanted more for the HD converter than I wanted to pay, PLUS they wouldn't make the Tennis Channel available here in this market. So last spring I switched over to DirecTv. (Did I mention I love tennis?) That has made a world of dfference. Cost is not a lot more, and I get more channels than I'll ever watch.

If I don't want to watch the commercials I can just record the program on the DVR and then fast forward past the commercials as they come on. That way I can watch an hour long program in about 40 mins.

But yes, HD makes all the difference in the world. And to me DirecTv beats the cable hands-down. It just gives you so much more flexibility! If we're having a real heavy T'stm it does sometimes lose the signal briefly, but for that matter Mediacom would lose the channel I was watching almost as much, so I can certainly live with that problem, considering how infrequently it happens.

One nice feature with the DVR, it's always recording the program your watching (tho not saving unless you specify), so when there's an interruption or you miss some dialogue or want a replay for whatever reason, you can just back it up and play that part again.

Carld
12-27-2009, 01:01 PM
Well, in the Hew Hes of Hay receiving radio and TV signals are free so far. There is, however, a movement to outlaw antenna broadcasting of TV signals so that you have to use cable or satellite systems. I suspect the cable/satellite lobbyists are giving huge sums of money to our representatives as I type. I suppose the outlawing of radio signals will soon follow if the TV thing passes Congress and Senate.

Any old way to get more money for the government and we will still have the adds.

I missed the boat. Gong into politics is the only way a pauper can go in office and come out a multi millionaire and be a legal criminal.

Circlip
12-27-2009, 01:12 PM
The Beebs advertising is subtle John, how many times have you not noticed as soon as a series programme has finished, they are showing parts of the next episode within minutes and the constant barrage of whats on Beeb two, three, four, I-player etc..

I think they're practicing, watch that space.

Regards Ian.

DICKEYBIRD
12-27-2009, 01:22 PM
I punched up the BBC On Demand channel this morning & watched a couple Top Gear episodes. Funny stuff! Blasting an old Mini down the ski jump ramp was pretty cool.

I'll bet those rubber suspension doughnuts took a beating when it landed.:D Or did they have Hydrolastic suspenders on Minis too? I worked on Austin America's over here (Morris 1100 over there?) and they had the Hydrolastic system.

aboard_epsilon
12-27-2009, 01:25 PM
Think the mini had both .at different times in its production life .

all the best.markj

gvasale
12-27-2009, 01:26 PM
I haven't heard anything about outlawing the over the air broadcast of tv. I'm curious to read where this is coming from. I managed to buy not that long ago two HD tvs, both of which are CRT sets. The picture, in my opinion is superior to LCD and Plazma. There is no distortion of any edges in any movement across the screen. Hopefully they will last until I die. Really too bad the envirowackos are screwing up so much in the world today.

aboard_epsilon
12-27-2009, 01:53 PM
read this today

not sure i understand it though

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2009/dec/22/bbc-drm-cory-doctorow

danlb
12-27-2009, 03:05 PM
what i was told that what you have now is backlit LCD......With a lifespan of 5 years ..and many TV repair places unable to fix them once the backlights bugger up ..too costly

whats coming out is LED with no backlights with hopefully a good lifespan.

my own TV is CRT..probably more than twenty years old now ..and still going strong....... i ain't buying anything until this packs up ..


TV repair places are very happy to replace the sources of the back-lights. There is a lot of money in what amounts to unplugging parts and plugging in new ones.

There are many light sources in use for TVs. Some of them quite robust, others will burn out in fairly short time.

My wide screen TV has 3 CRTs in the base that project on the back of a screen. It's only 8 years old. I expect it to work for another 10 years or so, though it only does about 1/2 of the possible HD modes and most inputs are not HD, so it will be replaced eventually.

My buddy has a 12 foot wide screen (projects from across the room) that uses special lamps. After 3 years the lamp dims or burns out. $150 per lamp. The bulb was user serviceable.

My other friend has a DLP TV. A bright light shines on a itty-bitty array of oscillating mirrors that reflect the light onto the back of a screen. He gets 3-5 years between bulb changes. The bulb was user serviceable.

Plasma is really bright, as the individual dots of light are generated on the screen. The plasma breaks down over time, though newer units will run 24x7 for about 7 years before they lose 50% of their efficiency. Plasma elements are not replaceable.

The ubiquitous LCD TV is just like a flat screen computer monitor. An array of cold cathode fluorescent (CCF) tubes (the size of thick spaghetti) shine through an LCD array. They last about 7 years of constant use too. CCF tubes require that the screen be carefully dismantled and put back together. The high voltage circuit that drives the CCF tend to die before anything else. :(

The "LED" TV is just an LCD TV that is illuminated from behind by an array of white LEDs instead of CCF tubes. LEDs have a longer life ( 11 years of 24x7 ), and can be individually controlled to dim when a large area should be black. Like a CCF tube, the screen needs to be disassembled to replace the LEDs.

Keep in mind that 24x7 is a lot more than most computers or TVs are on. A plasma that is watched 3 hours a day will last 20 years.

So don't worry too much unless you really have the TV on 24x7. The main reason for upgrading my last few TVs has been the extra capabilities of new models, not breaking the old ones.

Dan

barts
12-27-2009, 03:14 PM
I haven't heard anything about outlawing the over the air broadcast of tv. I'm curious to read where this is coming from. I managed to buy not that long ago two HD tvs, both of which are CRT sets. The picture, in my opinion is superior to LCD and Plazma. There is no distortion of any edges in any movement across the screen. Hopefully they will last until I die. Really too bad the envirowackos are screwing up so much in the world today.

I don't think that "envirowackos" are causing the switch to LCD & Plasma displays; that's happening because getting a large HD CRT that's 1080p is really expensive, the tube is very deep, and the picture degrades over time.

A good 24" HD computer monitor is order (list) $600 right now; the last tube monitor I had of that size and resolution cost (list) five times that.

You will likely see limitations on allowable energy consumption of TVs
in the future since reducing energy consumption is the best and cheapest
way of reducing C02 pollution. The per-capita usage of electricity in
California has stayed relatively constant over the last 30 years, thanks to
energy conservation efforts; this is in contrast to the rest of the country.

Pete F
12-27-2009, 03:26 PM
There is, however, a movement to outlaw antenna broadcasting of TV signals so that you have to use cable or satellite systems.


I haven't heard anything about outlawing the over the air broadcast of tv. I'm curious to read where this is coming from.

They did ban broadcast of analog TV, in favor of digital, in the US. Actually, I think what they did was stop licensing the 700MHz spectrum, so it could be used for wireless communications. An analog TV signal is massive compared to digital, so they wanted to free up that space for other uses (and auction off the licenses - not sure where that money is supposed to go). I have heard that people who used to get marginal signals over broadcast, now get pretty much nothing (that's just anecdotal), because digital is much more go-no go than analog. Kinda sucks for them.

-Pete

Black_Moons
12-27-2009, 05:34 PM
LED tvs are just LCD tv with LED backlights as someone previous said
they are suspected to last 10+ years
Typicaly drawing 100~150W for a 50" tv, where as a CCFL will draw 200~300W

Of course i have seen one led backlit 50" that drew like 350W (or at least speced it as max draw)

NOT ALL led backlight tvs have 'localised' dimming, infact the latest cheapest $2700 led tv does NOT have localised dimming and really isent any better then CCFL other then the fact it may last longer and use less power.

Repair shops (and even ebay) do replace inverters! these are the most common failure for CCFL backlights. However if the bulb itself is dieing (they do sometimes), the screen is toast.

That said, I just download shows these days. I refuse to PAY for advertisements, combined with the fact shows are allways played out of order, and typicaly for a 5 season show you will only ever see 10 eps played over and over and over.

My dad just rents videos from the libary, they have a new selection every week.

Timleech
12-27-2009, 05:48 PM
They did ban broadcast of analog TV, in favor of digital, in the US. Actually, I think what they did was stop licensing the 700MHz spectrum, so it could be used for wireless communications. An analog TV signal is massive compared to digital, so they wanted to free up that space for other uses (and auction off the licenses - not sure where that money is supposed to go). I have heard that people who used to get marginal signals over broadcast, now get pretty much nothing (that's just anecdotal), because digital is much more go-no go than analog. Kinda sucks for them.

-Pete

The analogue signal is being switched off area by area in the UK, ours in the NW went about a month ago. Not a question of banning it, all the broadcasters share a common transmitting station. In theory when they switch off the analogue they put up the power on the digital signal. I can't say I've noticed any improvement here, our signal is still sometimes a bit marginal.
Picture quality when it works is much better than analogue, though (not HD).

Tim

Carld
12-27-2009, 05:56 PM
They don't broadcast TV in analog anymore just digital. There was a blurb on TV the other day that said to contact your federal representatives because the FCC was trying to stop the TV stations from broadcasting over an antenna. They would be available on cable or satellite only.

I guess the FCC wants the TV frequencies for something more profitable to them.

The same thing is happening with the frequencies that is being used by the model airplane fliers. So far the AMA has kept them from taking our frequencies. The FAA is hot on our tails also because they don't like unmanned aircraft in the hands of unknowns. Security agencies are also involved because the unmanned aircraft can carry explosive devices.

It's getting to be a very controlling government out there and all our freedoms are being outlawed everyday.

airsmith282
12-27-2009, 05:58 PM
LCD tvs have no issues its the plasma tvs that are total junk,

danlb
12-27-2009, 06:55 PM
My parents use only broadcast TV. They went from getting marginal signals on 8 or 9 stations (Phoenix Arizona) to getting 30 or so very clear signals on the same antenna and TV.

The only big problems I have with the digital change-over is that the gov got billions for the sale of the frequencies and yet did not provide free digital adapters to every one. The vouchers 'almost' paid for the adapter, but not quite. The adapters should have been 100% paid for out of the profits from the auctions.

Dan

gvasale
12-28-2009, 12:28 AM
Supposedly, lead in the glass used to make CRTs is the environmental issue, among other things. In Massachusetts, it is illegal to dispose of them in landfills. Also other possible issues. I know that digital is more likely to be a problem when signal strength is poor. At least with analog tV you could often watch a snowy signal. Not so with digital. The dividing line between usable and crap doesn't appear to be very big. I was aware the spectrum used for analog tv was being used for other services, but somewhere I also heard that analog tv is only low power now, where available. FWIW, my two CRT HD tvs were in the $600-$700 range (30"-32") My first Samsung LCD 19" was $500.

andy_b
12-28-2009, 12:35 AM
I guess the FCC wants the TV frequencies for something more profitable to them.

The same thing is happening with the frequencies that is being used by the model airplane fliers. So far the AMA has kept them from taking our frequencies. The FAA is hot on our tails also because they don't like unmanned aircraft in the hands of unknowns. Security agencies are also involved because the unmanned aircraft can carry explosive devices.

It's getting to be a very controlling government out there and all our freedoms are being outlawed everyday.

EXACTLY! I was just reading an article that they are running out of bandwidth on the mobile phone frequencies, so I am sure that will be where the next open frequency range is allotted to. The govt makes huge money on those frequency auctions, so they love stealing them from one source to sell off to another. Sadly, the AMA (and other hobby groups) doesn't have the cash to purchase those frequency blocks.

andy b.