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Ken_Shea
12-28-2009, 07:25 PM
Inside my shop I built a show room (when I had the gun store) that was also a vault about 30x19 inside with a ceiling that is secure as well and also lower then the original ceiling, in this space I have been hearing noises, more recently a lot of fussing, figured it was these critters. Now what to do. Don't want to shoot them, it pretty late in the year to trap and re-locate them but they are so damned destructive I need to do something.

This was taken just minutes ago.

file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/user/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-2.pnghttp://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x175/Ken_Shea/Rocky.jpg

MTNGUN
12-28-2009, 07:32 PM
Awwww, they are so cute ....... unless they are destroying your property.

Ken_Shea
12-28-2009, 07:39 PM
Awwww, they are so cute ....... unless they are destroying your property.

In the back of the shop used for storage they have done a lot of ceiling damage. They are just trying to survive the best they can, it's not like raccoons try to be destructive, they just are destructive, that's the long and short of it. I hate to shoot them, I really do.
Any opinions on trapping and re-locating this time of the year?

C - ROSS
12-28-2009, 07:40 PM
They are cute

Keep em feed em teach em to growl and then call em watch dogs.

Ross

airsmith282
12-28-2009, 07:41 PM
well you can shoot them they make nice hats..other then that id catch them some how and take them for a long drive to the country and let them lose,

other then that you can call your local human society and have them remove them for you and make sure you get them to check for babies as well you know them raccoons all they do is eat and have sex all the time

Ken_Shea
12-28-2009, 07:44 PM
They are cute

Keep em feed em teach em to growl and then call em watch dogs.
Ross
ha-ha, they are some bad to the bone critters you get one backed into a corner. They are healthy and fat, I know they eat the cat food I put outside. I have seen three of them out side eating the cat food with cats not two feet away perfectly content.

.RC.
12-28-2009, 07:47 PM
all they do is eat and have sex all the time

When I die I want to come back as a raccoon...

Ken_Shea
12-28-2009, 07:49 PM
well you can shoot them they make nice hats..other then that id catch them some how and take them for a long drive to the country and let them lose,

other then that you can call your local human society and have them remove them for you and make sure you get them to check for babies as well you know them raccoons all they do is eat and have sex all the time

Well if that's what I've been hearing they are into some real rough sex :D

You got a barn and live anywhere near Lexington Ohio ? :D

hmmmm. there is a barn just across the road from where I live, not used for much, hard to believe I hadn't given that a thought.

john hobdeclipe
12-28-2009, 08:17 PM
all they do is eat and have sex all the time
Ah, the good old days! :)

***********************

We've trapped and relocated (4-5 miles away) several raccoons over the last few years, at least one of whom I'm convinced is a repeat offender. Don't get them cornered, don't piss them off, and don't get your fingers anywhere near the trap if you do catch them.

Other than that, they are kinda cute and innocent looking, aren't they?

914Wilhelm
12-28-2009, 08:26 PM
Don't get bitten. Raccoons are generally considered to be carriers of rabies and who needs the hassles of rabies immunizations.

RobbieKnobbie
12-28-2009, 08:28 PM
Inside my shop I built a show room that was also a vault about 0x19 inside with a ceiling that is secure as well and...

I'm not too sure it was as secure as you think it was, not if these little guys managed to stroll right in!:)

tyrone shewlaces
12-28-2009, 08:34 PM
Awwww, they are so cute ....... unless they are destroying your property.

So raccoons are a lot like kids then? hehe

Unless you want to train them to be a home security team (THAT would be cool), every minute you wait to eradicate them you'll regret. There will be stuff to fix I guarantee you. The list will just get longer if you don't get 'em gone.

I think every homeowner should have the right and easy access to have a tranquilizer gun. That would have been handy for me several times over the years.

whitis
12-28-2009, 08:50 PM
Given the attic like location, there are probably babies up there, and from the looks of it not easy to get to.

It is illegal in your state to trap and release the raccoons anywhere except back on your property, where they will probably go right back where you found them unless you can prevent access. You might be able to provide an alternative nesting site.


According to Ohio Administrative Code 1501:31-15-03, it is illegal to live trap, move and release raccoons.
Persons dealing with a nuisance raccoon cannot relocate the animal. There are only two legal options for
nuisance raccoons; euthanize or release on the same property where they were live trapped. Uninformed
people who are relocating nuisance raccoons may be contributing to rabies crossing the barrier.

http://www.odh.ohio.gov/ASSETS/FD77307EB3E64D83ADCE49F79527E3A6/NR042808.pdf

Google "trapping raccoons" turns up some tips and pitfalls. Here is what a wildlife removal company has to say:
http://www.aaanimalcontrol.com/professional-trapper/howtogetridofraccoons.htm
And this one is a little more open to DIY attempts:
http://www.raccoonatticguide.com/trapping.html

dp
12-28-2009, 08:52 PM
Put out a bowl of goldfish where they can see it. After the third bowl in three days you won't have to leave the area - they'll fish them out with you there. Move the bowl outside and fill it with dry cat food instead of goldfish. It will keep them occupied for a long time while you seal up their access.

mechanicalmagic
12-28-2009, 08:55 PM
One night about 3 AM I was awakened by a cold hand on my arm. Little hand, softly touching my arm. I open an eye to see a bandito standing on it's hind legs trying to see into my bed. I slowly got up and chastised the little guy as I followed him down the hall, thru the family room, and out the cat door.
Another time at night, I was in the back yard, a group was coming thru. I stood still, and had 7 Raccoons sniffing and wondering what I was.
Then there was the time my grand kids were here and they played handsies with the Raccoon thru the sliding door.
And I live in the city.

Back to your problem. Raccoons forage at night. This time of year, I'd wait until 10 PM and then plug their access to the shop. Put some cat food and water where you took the picture. If the food is still there in a couple days, you succeeded, if not try again.

Wild animals adapt quickly, or they become part of the food chain, supporting other wild animals.

And as posted above, Raccoons respond to just about everything with aggression.

lazlo
12-28-2009, 09:05 PM
When I lived in Richmond, Virginia, the raccoons were rampant with rabies. Don't know if that's common or just local to Richmond, but my Father and I shot three of them over a 2 week period, and 2 of them tested positive for rabies. This was circa 1996, so YMMV...

jkilroy
12-28-2009, 09:08 PM
Coon's make a mighty fine meal, don't laugh, they have been served in the e White House

~ 1 raccoon, dressed
~ 2 red pepper pods
~ 1 tsp salt
~ 1/4 tsp pepper
~ 1/8 tsp sage
~ 2 tbsp lemon juice
~ 4 large yams, peeled and quartered
~ 1/4 cup brown sugar
~ 1/2 cinnamon
~ 1/8 tsp ginger

Place the raccoon in a large pot with the peppers. Cover with water, bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 1 hour.

Remove raccoon from the pot and place on a rack in a roasting pan.

Pour the lemon juice on the raccoon. Sprinkle on the salt, pepper and sage.

Place the yams in the pan around the raccoon. Add 1 cup of water.

Mix together the brown sugar, cinnamon and ginger.
Sprinkle on the yams.

Cover and bake at 325 degrees for 2 hours or until the meat is crisp and brown.

Transfer to a serving platter.

Serve and Enjoy!

andy_b
12-28-2009, 09:13 PM
file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/user/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-2.pnghttp://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x175/Ken_Shea/Rocky.jpg

That's just the cutest darn picture ever. :)
I always liked raccoons. I never had any in my house though.

I would think there are more raccoons in your area than just these fellows. The other raccoons must have found a place to spend the winter. I'd agree with the other posters that if you can get them out of the space long enough to seal it up good, then they shouldn't bother you any more (well, they may hang around outside for a while trying to get back in). I kind of doubt there may be little ones there as they probably follow the same breeding habits as all of the other raccoons that don't have a warm house to spend the winter in.

The ones in the photo look healthy. We have had some out during the day missing hair and generally looking like crap. They usually end up as worm food, if you get my drift.

andy b.

chrisfournier
12-28-2009, 09:17 PM
While I find the 'coon skin cap fascinating and I salute Davie Crockett for this addition to the fashion pallate I would recommend that you live trap these little lovelies and teach them to do "fine work" in your shop. I've seen them do some amazing things with those tiny "hands". Perhaps you could open a watch repair shop and call it "Banditos"?

lazlo
12-28-2009, 09:18 PM
Coon's make a mighty fine meal, don't laugh, they have been served in the White House

What do they taste like? Do you eat possum? :p

Rustybolt
12-28-2009, 09:21 PM
racoons are mean as hell. If you corner them they wll attack you. See if you can borrow a live trap from your county animal control office. Bait it with donuts.Take em 20 or thirty miles away to a wooded area, or someone you don't like. Turn em loose. Fix the hole they made in your building.

daveo
12-28-2009, 09:26 PM
I had one die of lead poisoning here lately... :) It was sick....

scatter cat
12-28-2009, 09:42 PM
Fat and Healthy looks like barbque to me:D There must be some water close or they wouldn't have moved in on you.Get a live trap bait it with tunafish ,vinillawafers and peanutbutter ,cat food just about any cooked meat they arn't pickie. I fight with them every year over the sweetcorn in the garden:mad: Usually take them down by the river about 20 miles away Haven't had any that I know of come back.Always plenty to take there place though:rolleyes:

Boucher
12-28-2009, 10:00 PM
A friend moved into a rural house that had been vacant for a while. The first night there, after he went to bed all hell broke loose in the attic. There was a family of half grown Racoons playing with a beach ball someone had left stored there. He said it sounded like a herd of cows running from one end of the house to the other. He is a cop and he said he was a little concerned about raising the opening into the attic.

Ken_Shea
12-28-2009, 10:06 PM
Sure wasn't aware of the live trap laws, but doesn't surprise me, laws for everything.

I will risk it, they are too broke in this county to push real hard :D

I can borrow a live trap and then drop them off to the barn across from where I live, we feed wild animals all the time there, so a few more won't hurt.

They look very healthy, shiny coat, fat, you should hear them at this very moment up there having sex :D

I'd love to get a baby for a pet, had one many decades ago, they make really nice pets.

I bet there are more then two.

Black_Moons
12-28-2009, 10:31 PM
I recommend what you do is convert your shop to belt drive, put all the belts at 25 degrees slopeing down and feeder stations at the high part of the belt. Make those bandits work for thier meals!

mechanicalmagic
12-28-2009, 11:08 PM
I recommend what you do is convert your shop to belt drive, put all the belts at 25 degrees slopeing down and feeder stations at the high part of the belt. Make those bandits work for thier meals!

Obviously a Canadian.
The ACLU (Animal Civil Liberty Union), protects the rights of animals (other then humans). This would likely be considered slavery.
The ASPCA, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, (other than humans). Will dominate, and provide lawyers to resolve the issue.

dp
12-28-2009, 11:24 PM
There's two of them outside my sliding glass door as I write this. One weighs a good 40 pounds or more. The other is a bit lighter - both males. Last night a mother with two peewees interrupted their dinner. The little peewees ran both the big guys off and finished their dinner. Tonight it looks like they're going to be able to finish eating - it's the last of a 16lb bag we bought late last week. We have 5 families of them that have been coming around this year so we go through a lot of cat food. On Christmas night we had 3 families of them numbering 9 total wolfing down cat food from 5 piles.

It's interesting how they'll snarl, crowd and snap at each other when the food is out, but they never hurt each other. After they scatter the get into some pretty ugly fights, though. Kind of reminds me of a rugby game.

Ken_Shea
12-28-2009, 11:33 PM
Dennis, that 's right, they do snarl and growl but never seem to get serious, I usually make two separate piles so they get a fair share, only ever saw three here but you can bet there are more. The 3rd is huge, I mean big, haven't seen him in a while. They seem to get used to me pretty quick, I'll open the door and they hardly move, too busy eating I guess.
Life is fairly easy for us, for animals it is a day to day struggle just to get enough to eat, I'm happy to help them in that effort.

bborr01
12-28-2009, 11:57 PM
Maybe 20 years ago my brother in law and his son were taking a bicycle trip and came across a dead coon in the road. Shortly after that they came across a couple of baby coons. BIL gathered the babies in his shirt and brought them home.

One of them died, but the other one became a family pet. Not the least bit mean.
It would walk up and open a screen door with it's little hands and walk right in.
BIL told me to hold it. This coon would hug you like you have never been hugged before.
At the time I had a long full beard, and the coon would run its fingers through it like a comb.
It really was kind of a cool pet.

Then one day after about a year or a little more, it just wandered off and never returned.
Not for everyone but..............

Brian

DigiSnapMark
12-29-2009, 01:05 AM
When I was a younger, I wondered why trappers always seemed to work in the winters....

Now that we have had a half dozen generations of racoons living just down the hill from us, I figured it out :) We have several that would make some awesome hats right about now!

RichardG
12-29-2009, 01:27 AM
Racoons breed in february and have there young around may or june. The little ones are on there own after the first year. You will need to trap them with a live trap and move them and seal up where they are getting in. They like heated spaces in attics or in crawl spaces and can get in a very small hole. You will have to move them some distance or they will be right back, they have found a great home in there eyes , food and shelter thats all they want. The little ones should be fine, by now there mom has taught them how to forage and fend for themselfs .
Richard

madman
12-29-2009, 01:34 AM
Till theyre gnawin on your Head. Being up theres a perfect spot for them to do a group lunge and attack you. Wear a Helmet and catch em in a salmon net. I have to warn you to rally hang onto the handle tight. Also wear work boots in case you have to ward them away from youre groin when they get pissed off. Good Luck.

oil mac
12-29-2009, 07:21 AM
Ken go into You Tube, And look up Racoon Willie, He really likes Almonds He is really cute , Put Alistair down for one as a late Christmas present His good lady &family would be delighted:eek: :D

Ken_Shea
12-29-2009, 08:45 AM
Ken go into You Tube, And look up Racoon Willie, He really likes Almonds He is really cute , Put Alistair down for one as a late Christmas present His good lady &family would be delighted:eek: :D

I see there are lots of Raccoon Willies, the house guest one is what I am worried about, where Willie was in the process of redesigning the kitchen to his own needs. :D

I get one for you Alistair!

Ken_Shea
12-29-2009, 08:47 AM
Racoons breed in february and have there young around may or june.

That is good to know, now is not a bad time to transport them to a new location then.

Evan
12-29-2009, 08:50 AM
What do they taste like?

What? You never heard of the strange meat principle? They taste a little like chicken....

If you are going to move them Ken it better be more than a few miles otherwise they will be home waiting for you to get back.

wierdscience
12-29-2009, 08:56 AM
Hope this doesn't sound cold hearted,but live trap and deposit 10 miles or so away and don't worry.Somehow Raccoons have survived the last few eons without our help or houses.

Who was it,David that said he had seen plenty of treed cats,but never seen a cat skeleton up in a tree,somehow these things work themselves out.:)

Ken_Shea
12-29-2009, 08:57 AM
What?
If you are going to move them Ken it better be more than a few miles otherwise they will be home waiting for you to get back.

It's like 7 miles to home, I'll spin em around real fast a bunch of times before I release them :D

Ken_Shea
12-29-2009, 09:04 AM
Somehow Raccoons have survived the last few eons without our help or houses.


How true, although, it's the ones that haven't survived and the terrible way they have not survived that I want to minimize.

These little suckers have got to go, and go they will, I'll help them get a fair shot at a new start as best I can, at least for a while with a good place to be safe and food, then they are on their own.

Evan
12-29-2009, 09:05 AM
I figure that will take them a couple of hours, tops.

We don't have racoons here but we had them when we lived on Vancouver Island. They would pry the lid off the garbage can so I put a bunch of bricks on it. Caught them pushing the bricks off one by one and then prying the lid off.

One thing they hate is mothballs. It's good to keep away skunks too.

MotorradMike
12-29-2009, 09:10 AM
Moving wildlife in Ontario is illegal. I suspect it's the same anywhere there's rabies.

All you can do is either, put up with them, or kill them. If you pick 'B' it's best to keep quiet about it.

You don't want them in your buildings.


Mike

Ken_Shea
12-29-2009, 09:16 AM
Mike,
Yes, illegal here as well, I didn't know that until this thread, but the chance of getting caught is slim to none, borrow a pick up truck, throw a couple bales of hay in the back, drive 30 miles per hour (that's the max speed for farmers around here) and you'll never be stopped.

A.K. Boomer
12-29-2009, 10:18 AM
Im with you on that one Ken, I couldn't do the dirty deed esp. after seeing the pic - the one on the right looks like he's asking if its OK to "hang" with you - he's unaware of the fact that he's a royal PITA:D Relocate them and fix your shop so they can't get up there...

mark61
12-29-2009, 10:23 AM
Take a que from the SPCA, PETA and other "humain" sociaties. Run a gasoline engine in that area for a couple hours.

mark61

dave5605
12-29-2009, 10:29 AM
Look in your local yellow pages and call a pest/critter trapping outfit. Pay the money and let them figure out what to do with them after they catch them. They will also have experience getting any babies without them dying inside and stinking up the place.

The last one my daughter hired took squirrels (that got in a cathedral ceiling) about 50 miles and released them into the wilderness/woods.

kc5ezc
12-29-2009, 01:17 PM
Feeding 'coons? Gross! We live trap them and have a coon hunter that takes them to his farm and releases them. He keeps a feeder out at all time, so there are fresh tracks to start training the dogs with. Destructive little critters. This way the coon lives and preforms a useful function and he doesn't bother us any more. If you need small ones to play with see your Laz-Boy dealer. He has stuffed ones that are better than the real ones and don't tear anything up and you don't have to feed them.

Ken_Shea
12-29-2009, 01:55 PM
Take a que from the SPCA, PETA and other "humain" sociaties. Run a gasoline engine in that area for a couple hours.

mark61

My raccoons, I'll get rid of them my way not some red-neck and brag about it later method.

Ken_Shea
12-29-2009, 01:57 PM
Look in your local yellow pages and call a pest/critter trapping outfit. Pay the money and let them figure out what to do with them after they catch them. They will also have experience getting any babies without them dying inside and stinking up the place.

The last one my daughter hired took squirrels (that got in a cathedral ceiling) about 50 miles and released them into the wilderness/woods.

Not going to pay money when it is such an easy task to do myself and then I will know how they were disposed of.

David S Newman
12-29-2009, 02:12 PM
Here in the UK otters are becoming a problem, they were hunted to almost extinction over the last couple of hundred years because of the damage they done to the gentries fish stocks. Well the wild life concerns have been breeding them in captivity and releasing the young throughout the country and they are now thriving and a protected animal . To be honest they are a damn nuisance, around here if you have a garden pond unless there is an electric fence around it goodbye fish. My neighbour over a fortnight has lost all his Koi carp about 30 in all to otters and like foxes they kill for fun, headless fish all over his lawn. his fish were his life, they were 20-30 inches in length, none left. I can understand now why they were hunted. David

Ken_Shea
12-29-2009, 02:17 PM
Feeding 'coons? Gross! We live trap them and have a coon hunter that takes them to his farm and releases them. He keeps a feeder out at all time, so there are fresh tracks to start training the dogs with. Destructive little critters. This way the coon lives and preforms a useful function and he doesn't bother us any more. If you need small ones to play with see your Laz-Boy dealer. He has stuffed ones that are better than the real ones and don't tear anything up and you don't have to feed them.

John,
I have no intention of ever turning any animal over to either Coon hunters or any hunters that use dogs, having had a gun store for many years I cannot tell you the number and frequency of stories told of their treatment to the dogs they use or the animals they trap. No need to elaborate further.

derekm
12-29-2009, 05:22 PM
Bats are a problem - not that they are a problem themselves but they are so well protected - you can do nothing to your house if you have bats. You can't disturb them you can't block up any holes. If you have bats, you have bats forever but then i rather like bats.
Raccoons you can keep them. I'll stay with the weasels in the garden ( another cute and rather vicious critter). Though I could lose the the roe deer(theyre cute too) that eat the lettuce out of the front garden at during the rush hour . You wouldnt believe we are on busy road opposite a pub.
Cant shoot them here with out a high velocity rifle. Got the bow and arrow and the skill to use it, but here its illegal.

jkilroy
12-29-2009, 05:31 PM
What do they taste like? Like a cross between sea turtle and California condor...

Sorry, couldn't resist

They taste like good pork or beef depending on how you cook it, it is a dark meat. Makes a great roast in a bag with carrots and potatoes, etc. Taste like beef but more tender!

What ever happens it should start with salt and boil for an hour or two.

Oh, makes a FANTASTIC gumbo! Oh Yeah!

Spin Doctor
12-29-2009, 05:40 PM
Personally I think they're the second team if we manage to wipe ourselves out

Rustybolt
12-29-2009, 07:31 PM
Coon's make a mighty fine meal, don't laugh, they have been served in the e White House

~ 1 raccoon, dressed
~ 2 red pepper pods
~ 1 tsp salt
~ 1/4 tsp pepper
~ 1/8 tsp sage
~ 2 tbsp lemon juice
~ 4 large yams, peeled and quartered
~ 1/4 cup brown sugar
~ 1/2 cinnamon
~ 1/8 tsp ginger

Place the raccoon in a large pot with the peppers. Cover with water, bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 1 hour.

Remove raccoon from the pot and place on a rack in a roasting pan.

Pour the lemon juice on the raccoon. Sprinkle on the salt, pepper and sage.

Place the yams in the pan around the raccoon. Add 1 cup of water.

Mix together the brown sugar, cinnamon and ginger.
Sprinkle on the yams.

Cover and bake at 325 degrees for 2 hours or until the meat is crisp and brown.

Transfer to a serving platter.

Serve and Enjoy!

I almost got to try that one cold October afternoon. Fortunately one of us shot a duck.

Bootj
12-29-2009, 09:46 PM
My great grandfather lived in South Minneapolis and had lots of squirrels. He use to trap them paint their tails red and take them to the park. If they beat him home... You don't want to know what he use to do to stray cats.

Trap them, take them away... you don't want the problems that they create!
Regards,
Paul

jkilroy
12-30-2009, 12:04 AM
A duck has got nothing on a coon when it's dinner time!

Ken_Shea
12-30-2009, 12:14 AM
Well if I was interested in cooking these two I'm sure they would be good eating, a swamp across the road, a corn field to the right and cat food out front :D

Evan
12-30-2009, 01:15 AM
Personally I think they're the second team if we manage to wipe ourselves out

Hah. That honour will belong to cockroaches with rats being a close second. Cockroaches in particular can withstand much higher radiation doses than humans and can easily go for a month or two without eating.

dp
12-30-2009, 01:23 AM
Hah. That honour will belong to cockroaches with rats being a close second. Cockroaches in particular can withstand much higher radiation doses than humans and can easily go for a month or two without eating.

Reminds me of my ex-wife.

kc5ezc
12-30-2009, 10:31 AM
John,
I have no intention of ever turning any animal over to either Coon hunters or any hunters that use dogs, having had a gun store for many years I cannot tell you the number and frequency of stories told of their treatment to the dogs they use or the animals they trap. No need to elaborate further.

Ken, I agree, some people shouldn't be allowed to have dogs or trapped animals. This coon hunter treats his dogs very well. There are a lot of decent hunters and trappers out there. Maybe some of their stories are to impress their buddies; and maybe not.
Good luck.
John Burchett
in Byng OK

oil mac
12-30-2009, 10:38 AM
Cockroaches are horrible, They ,I found many years ago, were a nightmare to live with In digs i once had, No way will i co habit. with these little bastards, Anything with more than four legs is overkill :eek:
The rats are not much fun either! Although as a kid, i found a black one got it tame & it lived with our rabbit for a long time The rabbit was the boss.
Come to think on it after the cockroaches some stratas of our society are not far behind as regards theiving, destruction, behaviour etc Last night on the television was a remake of John Wyndhams "The day of the Triffids" Plant those things in the front garden and that would sort out Dereks deer problems
Hmmmmmmm ! might be a problem on getting them domesticated, they would be terrified of the wife :D

Ken_Shea
12-30-2009, 10:46 AM
Ken, I agree, some people shouldn't be allowed to have dogs or trapped animals. This coon hunter treats his dogs very well. There are a lot of decent hunters and trappers out there. Maybe some of their stories are to impress their buddies; and maybe not.
Good luck.
John Burchett
in Byng OK
Absolutely true John, it's just difficult to sort them out so I place them all under the same canopy until I know different, unfair to clump, probably, but that is the way it is.

We are all unfairly clumped as guilty in many ways when you think about it.

Evan
12-30-2009, 12:29 PM
There is one neighbour on this hill that we do not invite to our annual Christmas party. He fancies himself an expert trainer of hunting dogs and trains several per year for local hunters.

He uses a radio controlled electric shock collar to do the training. He will apply it for sometimes as long as a minute during which the young dog is howling in terrified pain. He is very careful to do his training only when his wife is at work and the only person that is close enough to witness this is me. He has been reported to the SPCA but of course they cannot take action without incontrovertible evidence. If I report him and testify against him he will without a shadow of doubt either poison or shoot my dogs at the first opportunity. Then I would be likely to do the same to him and that would not turn out well.

jim_geib
12-30-2009, 03:10 PM
Ken,


Trap them and give them a ride down to the lake, by the dam would be a good spot. they'll be happy little campers down there. If you take them across the street they will be in your driveway waiting for supper when you get back.

Jim
Mansfield, Oh

MTNGUN
12-30-2009, 03:16 PM
He uses a radio controlled electric shock collar to do the training. He will apply it for sometimes as long as a minute during which the young dog is howling in terrified pain.
Sorry to hijack the original thread, but....... shock collars can be very effective and humane -- I've tested them on my own neck, it's just an unpleasant tingle, no worse than a bee sting.

But, there is a right way to use shock collars and a wrong way. I can't imagine applying a shock for 60 seconds, normally it is only applied just long enough to get the dog's attention.

The shock level is adjustable with a pot. During the initial setup, a sane dog owner will start at zero and gradually turn the intensity up until the dog reacts by twitching his ear or cocking his head. That is the level used for training.

I had a problem with a husky mix chasing deer and livestock, both of which could get the dog shot. A shock collar seemed like a humane alternative to being shot, plus it would be a kindness to the deer.

Over a 3 month period, I applied a shock 3 times to the deer chaser, only for a few seconds each time. As soon as the dog broke off the chase, the shock was discontinued.

Not all dogs respond well to a shock collar. This was my experience with one cattle chasing chow, and after the first incident where he bawled, ran away, and refused to have anything to do with me, I gave up using the collar on him.

On the other hand, it was very effective on the deer chasing husky. Once a dog has acquired the habit of chasing deer, there is really no other way to break them of the habit, and usually only a few "training moments" are required to get the point across.

Evan, I don't doubt that some people abuse their pets and abuse shock collars, I just wanted to make the point that shock collars are not inherently evil.

Ken_Shea
12-30-2009, 07:49 PM
Ken,


Trap them and give them a ride down to the lake, by the dam would be a good spot. they'll be happy little campers down there. If you take them across the street they will be in your driveway waiting for supper when you get back.

Jim
Mansfield, Oh

Not a bad idea Jim, it's nice there and plenty of cover for them, we don't mind feeding them though, however, their waiting in the driveway may be a bit presumptuous :D