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View Full Version : Some pics of excellent craftmanship



cuemaker
12-30-2009, 05:52 PM
Not my work, but the work of South West Cues in Las Vegas. I ordered this cue in 1999 and just now got it. I ordered this about the time I started playing around with cue repair...

I wont give the exact cost for various reasons but its near the 3k mark.

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/089.jpg
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/091.jpg
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/092.jpg
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/094.jpg

rklopp
12-30-2009, 06:09 PM
I ordered this cue in 1999 and just now got it.

It took a decade to make that??? I hope you didn't pay a lot up front.

ptjw7uk
12-30-2009, 06:15 PM
Blimey if it took that long I'd forgot how to play!!!

Peter

cuemaker
12-30-2009, 06:22 PM
Well, I ordered in 1999.. at that time the expected wait was 7yrs.. It doesnt take long to build one... Really depends on how your are setup to make cue, how long you let them hang, wood movement etc (3 months)... this one took about 12 months from the time I paid the deposit to the time I got it....

Tony Ennis
12-30-2009, 06:31 PM
It's certainly gorgeous.

spkrman15
12-30-2009, 06:34 PM
Are those special threads to screw the cue together?

Rob :)

Carld
12-30-2009, 07:32 PM
Mighty fine looking cue stick.

Don't you make cue sticks too?

cuemaker
12-30-2009, 07:46 PM
Rob, yes they are... They are rolled by a company in San Diego, dont remember who..

Carld, I used to make cuesticks until I had to sell everything a few years ago. I am now trying to rebuild everything. I ordered this before I was really into it. My sell price on a cue like this would be about 800 plus 200 for the joint protectors,,,, or so... but then no one knows my name...

RB211
12-31-2009, 12:01 AM
Expensive wood sticks :)

Ken_Shea
12-31-2009, 12:07 AM
Beautiful workmanship.

Curious cuemaker, do these tend to gain in value over time beyond inflation?

Ken

steve45
12-31-2009, 12:31 AM
Very nice! Do they make you play better?

I have a cousin that makes custom wood furniture, etc. He has had his work displayed at the National Gallery of Art, in Washington. He did a conference table for CNN's headquarters years ago with ebony, ivory, and silver inlays. He also did inlaid murals in 44 doors used in the state capital building of one of the New England states (can't remember, Vermont, maybe?)

I thought about buying a set of his salt & pepper shakers for my wife, but I couldn't afford them.

JRouche
12-31-2009, 01:20 AM
Very nice looking cues. I like mine a lil slimmer on the fore end but Im sure the craftsman that made those could make them to any specs you desire. Nice work!!! JR

macona
12-31-2009, 03:56 AM
Yes, expensive cues do shoot better. Well, at least to the limit of the player.

If you suck it dont matter how much you spend on a cue.

I think a friend of mine has a cue from SouthWest Cues, cant remember for sure. I stopped playing a few years ago. Still have a 7' bar box in my front room though. Makes a great work table!

cuemaker
12-31-2009, 07:19 AM
Beautiful workmanship.

Curious cuemaker, do these tend to gain in value over time beyond inflation?

Ken

Really depends on the maker, the quality and condition. IMHO this is an example of pent up demand for a very high quality product. Yes, it will hold its value as long as its kept in the same condition. It will increase when the maker passes...

Example, Gus Szamboti... his cues in the 60's and 70's sold from as low as $50 to maybe $500+ before he got really famous.. Then he died early... Now, a cue that sold new for $106, in excellent shape with original invoice and shipping box recently sold for $5000 ish.....But there are other quality to his cue sticks other than age...

South West is really known for being a "players" cue in how it feels in the hands during and after the shot (which all comes down to transmission of vibration)

Doozer
12-31-2009, 10:32 AM
What is with the butt plugs? Seems unnecessary. Just for bling??

--Doozer

cuemaker
12-31-2009, 11:04 AM
What is with the butt plugs? Seems unnecessary. Just for bling??

--Doozer

If you mean the rubber plug on the fat end... its to protect the cue when its put down etc...

But I think you mean the joint protectors...95% bling 5% purpose to protect the joint pin from getting knocked...Remember, the pin is threaded and glued into wood... a knock could break loose the glue hold, move pin location etc. All of which would cause the cue not to be straight...

JoeLee
12-31-2009, 03:45 PM
Will You Be Able To Play Better With It ??????

Jl...

Errol
12-31-2009, 05:21 PM
As cuemaker, I guess you know the most important way to store a cue, expecially one like you have there is vertical, in a cue rack.

My dad owned and operated a pool hall for most of his livelihood, and I had the pleasure of working with him as I grew up. A lot of his working time was spent repairing and building cues.

The one thing I learned from him is to keep the cues vertical, never store them flat in a case. Cases are only for transport. Never lean the cues in a corner or flat on a pool table.

Does your cue have a compartment for adjusting weight? My favorite weight was 19 ounces.

cuemaker
12-31-2009, 05:47 PM
As cuemaker, I guess you know the most important way to store a cue, expecially one like you have there is vertical, in a cue rack.

My dad owned and operated a pool hall for most of his livelihood, and I had the pleasure of working with him as I grew up. A lot of his working time was spent repairing and building cues.

The one thing I learned from him is to keep the cues vertical, never store them flat in a case. Cases are only for transport. Never lean the cues in a corner or flat on a pool table.

Does your cue have a compartment for adjusting weight? My favorite weight was 19 ounces.

IMHO the best way to store a cue is to hang it from the joint pin.... I know a custom collector that has a custom display case that has a bar across the top that is threaded to receive the pin and has a properly matching joint pin for the shafts to hang... then from the bottom a small pedistal to support just some of the weight so its not all on the pin...Then its is sealed with a gas (argon?) to help prevent decay...

The 2nd best way is in a quality case laying on the floor...The is a gentleman in Alaska that had the biggest single collection of Szambotis in the world, amongst other cues, all in cases under his pool table. Cases stacked like wood...

No, adjustable weighting system...usually at this level of cue price you know what you want and its made to your specs. For balance reasons, weight is is usually forward of the handle, so permanently sealed.. You can mess with it, but you change the balance point.

quasi
12-31-2009, 07:19 PM
if you cut a few notches near the end of those cue's, they make excellent "pot passers" for when you are eating in the "Billyard" room.

Errol
01-01-2010, 01:32 PM
Hanging the cues makes a lot of sense.

My Dad would never allow a cue to lay flat. He said the moisture and temperature fluctuations would "bend" the wood. In the 40 below weather in northern Alberta, he even made sure the cue racks were't anywhere close to the warm air stream from the overhead furnace heaters.

The cues in those days were bare wood, no sealing, no argon. I don't think urethane varnishes etc.. had been invented yet.

In that area, 45 years ago, multi-section cues were a rarity, so I don't have life experiences to relate as to how to store them.

But today, if I invested in a thousand dollar cue, I would certainly store it vertical, surrounded by air, and not flat in a closed case.

Alistair Hosie
01-01-2010, 03:59 PM
Don't misunderstand me it is like all sports fishing golf etc .Many sprts lovers want to own the best and will pay for it,why not? As I see it it's a nicely made object and if it goes up in value just like a collectable 1 cent postage stamp, then maybe it's worth paying for a holding on to it.I doubt whether it would make you play better than a decent normal cue though . I really would find that hard to believe.Good luck I spend my pocket money on tools and machines and am pleased to say I am addicted:D Alistair

mochinist
01-01-2010, 04:59 PM
Nice stick, before my hand injury I used to be a pretty good pool player, had a pool table growing up and made lots of beer money playing three ball in my college dorm game room. My roommate had a really nice cuestick, I forget what brand but I believe it cost him around $500 in the mid 90's...man what a difference it was compared to the kmart two piece stick I had, I don't think it made me better, but it was just an enjoyable cue to shoot pool with.

cuemaker
01-01-2010, 07:08 PM
An expensive cue stick does not make a person better player. At the broadest level, a well made cue (which does have a certain entry dollar amount) provides a level of comfort and consistancy when playing. A level of trust develops.

Price level for a well made cue from an unknown cuemaker with no name value added is probably $100.00

On a narrower scale, a more advanced player will like one cue of another due to an etheral concept of "hit".. All cues have some level of deflection in the shaft that has some impact on the cueball. A person putting lots of "english" (side, side spin, etc) will notice the differnce between thin, whippy shafts vs thicker stiff shafts....sometimes the geometry of the shaft is in question..some companies test shafts to find the stiffest alingment for ball striking all in order to create a "stiff hit"

AD5MB
01-01-2010, 09:09 PM
how they are made on a commercial scale:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adUbpn7WZYA

don't bring a quality cue to a jive dive if you aren't willing to commit felony assault on a loudmouth to keep it. Brings the losers out of the woodwork.

J. Randall
01-02-2010, 05:09 AM
When I was a kid there was a local bodyshop owner that got in to building custom cues. He would build several and put them in the trunk of his old Caddy, and hit the road playing pool and selling cues. I don't know how his quality compares to custom cues of today, but they sure were pretty,had a lot of ivory inlays on some of them. His name was Verl Horn( I think that is the correct spelling). I don't know if any of them survived to present time, this was back in the 60's and 70's.
James

cuemaker
01-02-2010, 08:30 AM
Oh my goodness... I most certianly know of Verl Horn. He is the gentleman that taught the person who taught me to build cues, if that makes any sense.

I got this off a website..

Verl started making cues in 1961. He is considered the grandfather of cuemaking in the central Midwest. Many cuemakers owe their start to Verl, as he was always cheerfully sharing cuemaking techniques and other information and material sources. Verl would load a cue up with Ivory and still keep his prices very reasonable. He loved making the ivory V-points with veneers and his work was always sharp and clean. Verl's Irish linen wraps were some of the best pressed and flush with the finish in the business. He was a master auto body repairman and his finish represented that in his cues. Verl was instrumental in getting the very famous Prather Custom Cue Parts supply business started in the 1970's, which continues to this day. Without Verl's influence in that cue parts supply business, we probably would not have seen the 1980's and 90's boom in our cuemaking industry. He continued building cues in Mooreland, Oklahoma until he passed away in 1999