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View Full Version : How bad did I screw up, bought some A36 for tool holders.



clutch
01-05-2010, 06:27 PM
I had a bit of a brain fart last night, I bought some a36 bar stock to make axa boring tool holders. I *thought* A36 was something else.

It hasn't shown up yet for those that say try it and see.

Clutch

Evan
01-05-2010, 06:28 PM
It's mild steel.

Walter
01-05-2010, 06:35 PM
You'll be fine with it.

Forrest Addy
01-05-2010, 06:37 PM
Not too bad. Some think aluminum is OK but I prefer stouter stuff on account of wrecks, burrs, chip indentations, etc. Harder in tool holdeers means durability and lasting accuracy. WIth softer teel in thi application you have to be careful of raised metal from burrs and corner indentations interfering with fits and tool support.

A36 is a little better than plain old mild steel and if you can quench it fast enough it will even surface harden a little - but not enough to make a BIG difference but some.

lazlo
01-05-2010, 06:44 PM
It doesn't really matter. The quality of the steel doesn't make a lick of a difference on stiffness. You can still caseharden it if you want to reduce the set-screw bites, but other than that, it's a waste to use good quality steel on a toolholder.

clutch
01-05-2010, 07:17 PM
I was pricing some boring bar holders in AXA when I decided making my own was a *rgi* (really good idea).

Might be fun case hardening. I have ingredients for the bedside reader formula and an instrumented pottery kiln to do the deed in.

I need to find a good hobby type supplier of metals in Michigan area.

Clutch

snowman
01-05-2010, 08:19 PM
where are you in MIchigan?

I see North of Fudge, that could be a couple places....

I have used this company a few times...I like them, but I also pickup locally.

https://www.metalsupermarkets.com/MSC-Home.aspx

Walter
01-06-2010, 04:23 AM
All the tool holders I made are plain old 1018, they work just fine. No hardening needed. There's no need to get fancy for these

http://pic100.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/22626082/376177282.jpg

form_change
01-06-2010, 05:18 AM
Walter, that's a beautifully simple way of storing tool holders. Thanks for the inspiring photo

Michael
(I concur - ordinary steel is fine)

J Tiers
01-06-2010, 08:58 AM
There is a "case" to be made for say 4140PH, since it doesn't "burr up" as fast as 1018. other than that, no particular reason to use anything else unless you need the strength improvement of hardening.

clutch
01-06-2010, 06:17 PM
where are you in MIchigan?

I see North of Fudge, that could be a couple places....

I have used this company a few times...I like them, but I also pickup locally.

https://www.metalsupermarkets.com/MSC-Home.aspx

30 miles north of Cadillac.

Veiled clue as to where you are hiding?

Clutch

clutch
01-06-2010, 07:42 PM
All the tool holders I made are plain old 1018, they work just fine. No hardening needed. There's no need to get fancy for these

http://pic100.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/22626082/376177282.jpg


I'm thinking that if I wear out a holder, I'll make another. I love your tool holder set up. I have a few purchased ones and they are hard to keep near the lathe do to space limitations.

The cheapy CDCO AXA holders at 8 - 9 bucks are fine. The boring bar holders are a bit too steep for me.

Clutch

Walter
01-06-2010, 08:33 PM
Walter, that's a beautifully simple way of storing tool holders. Thanks for the inspiring photo

Michael
(I concur - ordinary steel is fine)
Your very welcome, this is the more complete picture of the setup, it sits on a free standing rack between the two lathes with chuck, collet, centers and whatnot stored at the bottom. it was a quickie one morning whilst I was turning some big cast press parts. It's really ugly, but very functional.

As for the holders, I'd probably not make them myself except it's no big deal to slap em in the horizontal and hog em out while I'm running other stuff, and it's far easier to get a purchase order on materials than it is to get stuff like extra holders.

http://pic100.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/22626082/376177283.jpg

snowman
01-06-2010, 08:38 PM
I'm in SE Michigan. Far enough west of Detroit that I don't catch stray bullets and far enough east of Ann Arbor that I don't get a contact buzz by breathing the air.

I too like Walter's setup, I've seen it (or a similar posting) before and it's on my list of things to do :) (that list is very very long)

loose nut
01-07-2010, 08:45 AM
Why would you make tool holders when you can buy them for $9.00 each from CDCO.

If you are in Michigan then go to the NAMES show and buy them there (CDCO usually has big bins of them there) and you get to see the show also.

clutch
01-07-2010, 08:57 PM
Why would you make tool holders when you can buy them for $9.00 each from CDCO.

If you are in Michigan then go to the NAMES show and buy them there (CDCO usually has big bins of them there) and you get to see the show also.

Boring bar holders. Try to put a 1" D bar in one of those $9.00 holders. Hey thanks for pointing out that CDCO normally has the 9.00 ones at NAMES. Those are too inexpensive to make. I'll be attending again this year. Shorter drive too. :)


Clutch

Rich Carlstedt
01-07-2010, 09:53 PM
Making your own toolholders has some advantages.

Like custom holders for specific work.

I made this 3/8 bore holder for small boring bars and holding indicator shafts.
It is holding a sleeved 3/16 boring bar
I was going to make a L shaped one to mount a Dial indicator to read both axis's.Later this year maybe
There is no end to the custom tools.
I made one for bolt/screw fabrication, but have no pic.
You can see extra blanks I have on hand of various sizes for jobs that may come up. Sorry for the blurry picture, but you get the idea
Rich
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P1070119.jpg

Rich Carlstedt
01-07-2010, 09:58 PM
Sometimes when you post pictures, a whole new interest appears.
After posting the above photo, I realised that my Lathe tool drawer was open
and in focus on the right side of the photo. No big deal, just a commercial Aloris toolholder there, but if you look below it, you can see the jig I use for drilling holes in the top of the custom holders. The two dowels fit into the dovetail, and guide the drill bit.
Rich

clutch
01-07-2010, 10:00 PM
Making your own toolholders has some advantages.

Like custom holders for specific work.

I made this 3/8 bore holder for small boring bars and holding indicator shafts.
It is holding a sleeved 3/16 boring bar]

I didn't mention wanting to play with teeny bars. Want to try my hand at turning a bullet mold some day soon.

Clutch