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northbrun
01-06-2010, 05:22 PM
hi I'm new here and not much of a machinest (yet). I have a midis 1200 and would like to put a longer cross feed on it.. dont know where to start.. any ideas?
thanks
paul

Fasttrack
01-06-2010, 05:31 PM
hi I'm new here and not much of a machinest (yet). I have a midis 1200 and would like to put a longer cross feed on it.. dont know where to start.. any ideas?
thanks
paul


Hmm... that would be quite an undertaking, imo. Maybe something to save until you have a little more experience...

Generally, you need to extend the screw and the dovetails. The screw means you will need to purchase a new acme threaded rod - however you need a threaded rod that is accurate! Rolled threads usually have an errror of about 0.007" per foot, which means if you move the table 12" you may actually move it 12.007 or 11.993 etc. That's not a huge error, but it can be frusterating. Then you have to be concerned with extending the dovetails. I suppose you could buy a chunk of cast iron and machine some dovetails and then drill/tap for studs to anchor it to the existing saddle... but you'll have a real headache trying to keep everything aligned properly. OTOH, the midas has machined dovetails, not ground and certainly not hand scraped, so maybe accuracy is your primary concern when you lengthen it.

p.s. Welcome aboard!

northbrun
01-06-2010, 06:13 PM
well like I said, I'm still learning. What I ment was the smithy onle has about 7" of travel on the Y axis. I would like to have more travel on this axis for milling.

Uncle O
01-06-2010, 07:20 PM
I have an old 1270XL , and I think you are pretty much stuck with that 7" of travel in Y.

You know a Bridgeport only has 12" in Y .....

Fasttrack
01-06-2010, 08:19 PM
well like I said, I'm still learning. What I ment was the smithy onle has about 7" of travel on the Y axis. I would like to have more travel on this axis for milling.


Yes, I knew what you meant. I own a Smithy Midas, too and I understand where you're coming from. Honestly, it would be easier and more cost effective to look at buying a larger used machine (or new if you've got the $$) after you've had some fun with the Smithy. That is what I did.

To get more travel, you need a longer "screw" - the part that feeds the table - and longer dovetails - the part the guides the table. Without these two components, you won't be able to extend the travel. You can take the table off of the carriage fairly easily; just extend the table to its farthest point where it stops moving and then slide it the rest of the way by hand and you'll be able to see how it all goes together.

Like I said, it would be quite the undertaking. Much easier to look at getting a larger machine ;)

ahidley
01-07-2010, 06:14 PM
just turn the piece being cut 90 degrees and use the X, cost $0

Black_Moons
01-07-2010, 06:24 PM
ahidley has the right idea actualy :) It would be easyer to learn how to not need more Y then to rebuild your machine to have more Y.
Learn multiple setups, dialing the part back in after fliping it around (double the Y right there!), other types of setups that can reduce Y length needed, or rethinking how the part is built, consider welding or bolting or pining or brazeing multiple peices togethor

Fasttrack
01-07-2010, 06:42 PM
just turn the piece being cut 90 degrees and use the X, cost $0


You must not be familiar with the Smithy machines. X actually has less travel than Y. These are "3-in-1" machines, so there is a milling head that is hanging over the ways for the lathe. The Y axis is what we would call the Z axis on a lathe (i.e. the longitudinal direction). The Y travel for the mill is severely impeded by the fact that the spindle for the lathe is in the way ;) I think the milling machine spindle only juts over about 6" from where the spindle for the lathe is so you essentially only have 6" of useful travel.