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pgmrdan
10-20-2003, 03:53 PM
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[This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-19-2004).]

Evan
10-20-2003, 04:12 PM
Dan,

4130 is a medium carbon (0.33) chrome moly steel. It can be hardened and has pretty good machinability at 70% rating. It is gas weldable and can be brazed but care must be taken to avoid overheating or it will crystallize badly. It is strong and can be treated to produce tensile yield strength up to 106,000 psi in a normalized condition. It is widely used in aircraft fittings and structures like motor mounts as well as in motorcycle frames. It has good fatigue resistance and good strength to weight ratio.

It tends to work harden and for drilling cobalt steel drill bits should be used. For turning and milling carbide tools should be used.

I wouldn't reccommend it for a beginner unless you need the properties. Work with mild steel to start.

[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 10-20-2003).]

pgmrdan
10-20-2003, 04:19 PM
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[This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-19-2004).]

Joel
10-20-2003, 05:35 PM
Just stick with plain old CRS unless your projects require something more exotic. If you need something harder, drill rod sure comes in handy (now that you have a torch to heat-treat it with).

L Webb
10-20-2003, 06:02 PM
I run one job for a customer out of 4130N sheet.
The only mill that produced it in the US has stopped making it. It is getting a little scarce. Fortunately, I found a supply last week and told our customer to buy at least a years worth.

It is possible to buy 4130 sheet and have it heat treated to the spec we need. It will simply cost quite a bit more.

The only material we can substitute for the 4130N in this application is titanium. I would much rather stamp and form the 4130N.

Les

bspooh
10-20-2003, 07:12 PM
I use 4130 extensively...machines very similar to 4140...no problem..4130 is a better grade to "carburize" than a 4140.....

brent

wierdscience
10-20-2003, 11:52 PM
4140/4130 are both good steels to use for various projects,but there has been a lot of misconception as to what the maximun hardness it will achieve is,I worked for an engineer who insisted it could be used to make punches,nope it will only attain a rockwell of 28-32c normally no good for punches,unless for leather or such,also had another who insisted that you didn't need to pre-heat prior to welding,also nope,is great stuff to work with,but it has its place.

bspooh
10-21-2003, 12:00 AM
I routinely harden 4130 to 50+ Rc...I have been told by some "Heat treaters" that you can't get 4130 that hard...WRONG, I have been Hardening 4130 to 50+ Rc for atleast 20 years...I use 4130 75% of the time..a little more expensive than 4140 ...

brent

Evan
10-21-2003, 12:04 AM
In thin sections with water quenching it can go to RC36. More important in that condition it goes to 161,000 psi ultimate tensile strength!

www.matweb.com (http://www.matweb.com)

[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 10-20-2003).]