PDA

View Full Version : lathe instruction



jan mensink
10-20-2003, 07:18 PM
I am new to metal working, and have just purchased a new lathe, milling machine, metal bandsaw. I realize that I need more knowledge about operating this equiptment. Do you have any recomendations wrt lathe operating books or videos that are good and wont break the bank.
jan

ibewgypsie
10-20-2003, 07:24 PM
Look for some Guy Lautard books. I bought mine off ebay.

Been a lot of help from this board too. I try to give back when I can..

David

darryl
10-20-2003, 07:50 PM
The first book I read was a high school textbook called 'technology of machine tools'. I have re-read that book so many times now I can't count. It covers a lot of ground in all fields of metalworking. Maybe there's a copy rusting in a school somewhere that could be had for the asking. The educational mandate requires new texts from time to time, but that doesn't obsolete the info in the old versions, it just makes those books lay around somewhere. There's more in there than I have absorbed, and I've been at this (hobby) for over ten years.
Welcome to the group.

Al Messer
10-20-2003, 08:10 PM
Any Vocational Schools or Tech Colleges in your area that offer evening classes for Adults? I went to one here for a couple of years and really learned a lot of helpful stuff.

beckley23
10-20-2003, 09:38 PM
The best lathe book I have seen is South Bend's "How to Run a Lathe".
Harry

shaque
10-20-2003, 09:48 PM
Ya know, ya get yourself a book and by the time you understand it all, ya will have read it ay least a hundred times, cause ya keep comin back to it fer reference. just don't read the words right off the page. serious now., the southbend books and some of the ones from th UK (if you can sort out the different references to the parts of the lathe) will give you a good understanding of the operation of the lathe. try some of the projects that you see in the HSM mags and others just to get your feet wet...
lots of luck
Jim http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif


[This message has been edited by shaque (edited 10-20-2003).]

Joel
10-21-2003, 12:33 AM
Hi, sounds like you’re about to have a lot of fun. As Harry said, the South Bend book is good. Short, to the point, and under $10. I also recommend Moltrecht's "Machine Shop Practice", vol 1&2.

abn
10-21-2003, 03:14 AM
I'm pretty sure California (still) has the lowest per unit community college fees in the nation...Shame to let that resource go:

http://www.bc.cc.ca.us/academic/occupational/automated_production.asp

Looks like a 30 mile straight shot up Hwy 58 so go get yourself a "Certificate of Completion
Basic Machine Tool Operations-Lathe, Mill", get a nice shiney frame (or make one) and hang it on the wall above your lathe. It's only three units. Looks like the program is more focused on CNC, but you may luck out and get a great instructor who will get you up to speed.

http://www.bc.cc.ca.us/academic/degrees/degree_detail.asp?id=121

franco
10-21-2003, 04:31 AM
As Harry and Joel said, "How to Run a Lathe" is an excellent lathe book. Another, if you can find a copy, is L. H. Sparey's "The Amateur's Lathe". A good starting book for milling is "Vertical Milling in the Home Workshop" by Arnold Throp, one of the Nexus Special Interests (Model Engineer) Workshop Practice Series books.

franco.

sidneyt
10-21-2003, 08:54 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by darryl:
[B]The first book I read was a high school textbook called 'technology of machine tools'.

Go to abebooks.com and look for it. You can buy a copy for under $20.

pgmrdan
10-21-2003, 09:25 AM
.

[This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-08-2004).]

Al Messer
10-21-2003, 09:41 AM
Wise Owl Publications has Sparey's book for $25.00 US, plus shipping, and it is worth every dime!

opua
10-21-2003, 03:24 PM
Use every source you can to hone your skills, the advise already posted is all valid. I subscribe to HSM and MEW and there is a wealth of pracitcal information in these publications. You might want to look at the American Gunsmith machine shop videos, seem well presented but watching them won't turn you into an instant machinist, lots of time at your machines starting with the basics will put you on the road. We are not born with this knowledge we all have to learn it through some medium. Good luck its a great hobby, pay careful attention to the safety issues.

spkrman15
10-21-2003, 04:02 PM
"How to run a lathe" is great. It takes things slow and keeps it interesting. "the amateurs lathe" was good as well. I wish i had read how to run a lathe first. I found it clearer.

Spkrman15

JCHannum
10-21-2003, 04:33 PM
All the publications mentioned are good sources for learning. Read everything you can get your hands on.
The How to Run a Lathe book is good, but I have found the Atlas/Craftsman book to be more comprehensive, and maybe a bit simpler for the beginner to understand.
The person who has had no exposure to machining will be best served by going to some formal training however. Community college, adult education, or whatever is available. The hands on experience cannot be duplicated with books.

John O
10-21-2003, 07:05 PM
I am presently taking machining courses at a community college. It is free, since I'm over 60, in NY State. Great instruction and facilities. The graduates are in demand, but this is for fun, in my case.
A friend and I bought Rudy Kouhoupt's videos on the lathe and mill. They were much better than the night school instructor at the local high school. But, it's better to have an instructor to question.



<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jan mensink:
I am new to metal working, and have just purchased a new lathe, milling machine, metal bandsaw. I realize that I need more knowledge about operating this equiptment. Do you have any recomendations wrt lathe operating books or videos that are good and wont break the bank.
jan</font>