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Ian B
10-19-2003, 12:15 PM
On a previous visit to a wood crafts shop in the UK, my wife had seen a christmas tree full of turned wooden baubles. She started plucking them, only to be told by the shop owner that they weren't for sale - customers had donated them over the years, so put them back, please.

I decided to knock a few out. I wanted them to be nice & spherical, so I started looking at the various ball turning attachments for lathes. This looked like turning into another one of those making things to make things projects.

Instead, I rigged up a dividing head and a boring head, and held the work in the miller's spindle:
http://www.photobucket.com/albums/1003/IanBartlett/2963c48f.jpg
http://www.photobucket.com/albums/1003/IanBartlett/ec20a1ea.jpg

And it worked fine. I'm lucky, in that the dividing head has the same taper as the mill (if Tim Leech is reading this, yes, that's your old dividing head...)

For some of the balls, I offset the table on teh X and Y axes - the shapes were no longer balls, but decorative all the same.

I made a dozen balls, now I just need to polish them, fit brass eyes to hang them with, and that's one Christmas prezzie sorted out.

Ian

Evan
10-19-2003, 12:37 PM
My wife has seen this. You Bastich. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif I will have no rest until I try this. I don't have your convienient setup but it can be done.

wierdscience
10-19-2003, 01:00 PM
Nice technnique,I have to try it also!

spope14
10-19-2003, 01:10 PM
Great job. This is why I kee3p coming to the page.

Ian B
10-19-2003, 02:23 PM
Thanks guys,

Just after I posted this, I saw the post on a similar topic (is it possible to...)

Looking at the posts, especially John Stevenson's, it makes you realise how many different ways there are to skin a cat.

Evan; do you have a rotary table? Mount it on an angle plate, clamp your lathe's topslide to the rotary table, rig up a toolholder, same effect.

Ian

shaque
10-19-2003, 03:09 PM
Nice job Ian, this is the kind of stuff we look foreward to seeing, BUT, I have to agree with Evan, if the missus sees this there will no peace in the Swanson household http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif, he made a big mistake letting the better half see this post http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif Jim http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

John Stevenson
10-19-2003, 03:41 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by shaque:
Nice job Ian, this is the kind of stuff we look foreward to seeing, BUT, I have to agree with Evan, if the missus sees this there will no peace in the Swanson household http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif, he made a big mistake letting the better half see this post http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif Jim http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif</font>

Copy of this post emailed to mrs.jjswanson@sympatico.ca

John S.

Herb W
10-19-2003, 04:32 PM
Evan,
You're missing a golden opportunity here...Ian did this in a TURRET MILL...certainly can't be done without a TURRET MILL...

Sure would be nice to have a TURRET MILL...

Betterhalf
10-19-2003, 07:12 PM
Evan is downstairs slaving away. Says he is making something to make these with???? Will have to see what he comes up with.????? I am sure he will let you know.

Alistair Hosie
10-19-2003, 08:09 PM
Herb W
Member posted 10-19-2003 04:32 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Evan,
You're missing a golden opportunity here...Ian did this in a TURRET MILL...certainly can't be done without a TURRET MILL...
Sure would be nice to have a TURRET MILL...

Actually this can be done quite easily with a woodturning lathe by hand I wonder why you feel this can only be done on a turret mill Alistair

John Stevenson
10-19-2003, 08:18 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Actually this can be done quite easily with a woodturning lathe by hand I wonder why you feel this can only be done on a turret mill Alistair

[/B]</font>

Spoilsport.

Alistair Hosie
10-19-2003, 08:45 PM
Sorry john http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif hey I saw this on ebay and thought of you check it out .Alistair
Artikelnummer: 2565602047

Herb W
10-19-2003, 09:45 PM
Betterhalf, Alistair,
Just teasing Evan...noticed from reading here that he's pining for a milling machine.

When a shop guy reeeaaaally wants another machine he's gotta take every opportunity that comes along to convince himself, and, ahem...those around him...that he just can't get by without it.

Alistair Hosie
10-19-2003, 10:15 PM
We like our toys what's wrong with that http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif
I say we deserve them .Alistair

Evan
10-19-2003, 10:19 PM
You all will have to help me out here. This just isn't a good enough excuse to buy a mill. I need something better.

Here is my South Bend 9" wood lathe and the adapter I whipped up this afternoon to turns balls. Wood balls. Big wood balls.

It fits in the tool post and can turn up to about 2.5" balls. This one was a real bitch 'cause all I had handy was a chunk of cedar fence post. It kept spinning on the mandrel. BUT, it works.

BTW, the pulley is the handwheel.

http://vts.bc.ca/img/balls1.jpg

[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 10-19-2003).]

Joel
10-19-2003, 11:43 PM
Evan, nicely executed solution. I've found that it sure makes cleanup easier if you put a piece of sheet rubber over the bed before cutting wood or doing any grinding. Notch it to fit around the compound if needed.
You need no great excuse to get a useful machine. The sooner you get one, the closer it will be to worn out when you die of old age. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

AmickRacing
10-20-2003, 12:00 AM
I guess I don't see the need for a turret mill either *shrugs*

I do however see the need for a CNC lathe, something with around a 16" swing or bigger should do the trick. But I think I could make due with one of them proto-trak type lathes.

Wait, I gotta drill a hole in the wood 1st to put the arbor in, better put me down for a CNC (or equivilent) mill too!

Alistair Hosie
10-20-2003, 08:23 AM
Nowyartalkin http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif Alistair

Brian Gale
10-20-2003, 08:49 AM
Newbie here...so how does a guy do that out of aluminum...?

Evan
10-20-2003, 12:05 PM
Brian,

Have a look at this page. There is a mistake on the page, the caption for the first picture is wrong. It is really a boring bar holder.

http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/MLA-13.html

The gadget I made for turning wood balls is not rigid enough to do metal.

davestea
10-20-2003, 08:08 PM
Great idea - it works for metal too -

I put a small boring head into a rotary table - same thing -

but then I designed (working on) a holder for the boring head - that fits the quick change holder.

wierdscience
10-20-2003, 09:41 PM
Evan,good show!

Just one suggestion-Shopvac!

Evan
10-20-2003, 10:55 PM
Yeah, next ones I do I'll tape the shop vac nozzle nearby. Got off work too late tonight to pick up some nice wood, we have a place in town that stocks exotic hardwoods so I should be able to find some nice combinations. Say, not being a wood expert, are there any considerations as to what glues to use on exotic hardwoods like rosewood etc?

Big Dipper
10-21-2003, 01:14 AM
Evan, they say to use epoxy for "oily" woods. I would put rosewood in that category. Also the standard "woodworkers glue" does not make a solid joint line...it wil "creep" somewhat.

Joel
10-21-2003, 01:26 AM
Evan, I just use regular old aliphatic resin glue. If you are going to use darker woods, Elmer’s makes a dark brown glue that hides the glue lines better. Use plenty on end grain and let it absorb for a minute. If you are gluing an oily wood like padauk, wipe it with naphtha or alcohol first. You could laminate up some interesting woods like padauk, purpleheart, lacewood, zebrawood, or curly maple, and finish with a clear danish oil.

Evan
10-21-2003, 01:51 AM
Joel,

That sounds easy to me. I have done cabinet work but really don't like it all that much. I've never done much with hardwoods. This is softwood country. All my furniture is pine. In this case I won't have to worry about the glue squeezing out, I can just leave it. I have a good friend that I am in awe of. He does things with wood that defies explanation. He made a chest of drawers once where the planks of aged oak he used were slightly warped to a curve. So he made the front of the chest slightly curved. I actually think that fine woodworking is a finer skill than machining. The material is much more unpredictable.

Joel
10-21-2003, 03:34 AM
They are indeed very different mediums. To me, fine woodworking is more like an art, and machining, more a science. Wood shapes easily, and thus allows much freedom of form. Different woods, grains, and finishes can be used to artistic advantage. I could never build a table or clock from a design I didn't create. To me, cabinet making is work done of necessity, it’s not the same. With your ornaments, you could easily and cheaply laminate different species of small strips (say 3/8x1x3) together into an octagon. Leave some irregular gaps dimensionally consistent with the pieces used. Turn in to a ball and Voila, original art! My woodworking machines are set up to be precision tools. I have fit countless joints in wood to tolerances of a thousandth or two. Ironically, I think fabricating with metal requires more creativity. The countless functional uses of metal often necessitates complicated and creative solutions be found, to make a needed part to precision. This skill lies in the operator. And the beauty of a crisply machined billet... But of course you already knew that.

thistle
10-21-2003, 06:14 AM
if you are messing with exotic woods like rose wood make sure you protect your self from inhalation contact of the dust chips as you can get an alergic reaction.

i user a lot of epoxy,but it is messy and a p in the a as you inevetibly end upmaking way more than you want .
sometimes epoxy is not appropriate for hard woods where the entire mass is not encapsulated ,as you may get a joint failure aas the glue is stronger than the wood .

resin glue is good ,yellow glue ok but leave it to cure for a good while before turning it .
the only glue thats been tested for hundreds of years is hide glue ,its a p in the a but at least you know how its going to behave and it is restorable -ie you can get theparts apart reapply and of you go, which the modern glues are not.

i like some others must make now wooden balls for xmas , hey i can make this on the lathe and look how good it is ,just imagine how good all the other stuff must be dear...................

hylandr
10-21-2003, 05:26 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by thistle:
[B]if you are messing with exotic woods like rose wood make sure you protect your self from inhalation contact of the dust chips as you can get an alergic reaction.

Thistle,
You got the point right, but expressed it with one questionable word that can lead to a misunderstanding. Some people with "Hardy" constitutions might believe that because they don't have "allergies" they are safe from wood dust when sanding exotics. Perhaps you should stress the word TOXIC instead of allergic. The dust truly is toxic, and while allergies may also be an individual concern, Toxicity affects everyone.

Disturbing visual begins here, skip if you're squeamish...

After just 5 minutes of sanding purpleheart and cocobolo, I spent 10 minutes in the yard trying out for the Olympic Hurling team. Almost made it, too, but I lived...

Robert in Tacoma

wierdscience
10-21-2003, 07:04 PM
Yes on wiping down the oily stuff with den-alchol.

Oh and the allergy thing,I have had African Rosewood raise welps on me inside of five minutes.

You also have to watch some exotics that sometime have little flecks of sulfer and phosphorus in the grain,almost lit my tablesaw once.

Evan
10-21-2003, 11:20 PM
Well, I dug out a nice piece of teak and white oak from my aging bin and bought a piece of purple heart and one of black walnut. That should give me something to work with. We'll see how it turns out.