PDA

View Full Version : Is Zeus as good as they get?



form_change
02-03-2010, 03:51 AM
Lately I've been doing more with BA, BSF and BSW threads (probably because of the hardware I own). Machinery's Handbook is good for the US threads and even has Whitworth but my edition does not have BSF (or BA I think) listed. For these I'm getting basic information from my Zeus book. Is there a publication that has Machinery's Handbook level of detail on these threads? (Alternately, is there a UK edition that does have this information in it?)

Michael

.RC.
02-03-2010, 03:56 AM
Some people like this book http://engineersblackbook.wordpress.com/engineers-black-book/

John Stevenson
02-03-2010, 04:53 AM
Not seen that one Ringer, well I have but not in the flesh and the index isn't too clear on what's in it.

Problem is you throw about 25 UKP at it [ about $40 ] and it's not up to scratch and that's the book fund wasted for another week.

.

Peter.
02-03-2010, 05:40 AM
Isn't that the one that oldtiffie sometimes posts pages from? Seems like a good source of info to me.

Glenn Wegman
02-03-2010, 07:37 AM
MSC has the book on sale right now for about $25.00.

Search eBay for an older copy of "Amarican Machinists Handbook". I have a 7th edition, which is about 1937 I believe, and all of the british thread specs are in there, as I commonly cut BSF threads.

I also have some poretty good charts that I harvested from the internet. You might just try Googling "British thread specs" and see what pops up.

DickDastardly40
02-03-2010, 11:46 AM
Some people like this book http://engineersblackbook.wordpress.com/engineers-black-book/

I have one of those and would recommend it over zeus tables any day.

I bought mine from J&L for about 12 on an offer from their postal magazine. It comes with an ally drill sharpening guage.

The book includes so much more than zeus including rotary and dividing head data, torque conversion chart, socket size cross reference, speed & feed data including sfm to rpm, Tee slot sizes, weights of various sections of brass and steel, insert data, hardening and tempering colours and quite a bit more.

Hope you manage to see one to confirm it's what you want before you buy one.

Al

Peter N
02-03-2010, 12:19 PM
Isn't that the one that oldtiffie sometimes posts pages from? Seems like a good source of info to me.

I dunno about that, they can't even get the nomenclature right so the tables might not be either! :D

rkepler
02-03-2010, 12:29 PM
There's always _Guide To World Screw Threads_, ISBN 978-0831110925. Covers most threads, I think I've only found a couple that they didn't have (API drill stem was one). Some of the British thread standards: Whitworth, BSW, BSF, Truncated Whitworth, British Brass Thread, Model Engineers, Conduit, BSP, Gas Cylinder, Copper Tube

.RC.
02-03-2010, 03:56 PM
Isn't that the one that oldtiffie sometimes posts pages from? Seems like a good source of info to me.

No he sometimes posts from this book here https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Fitting-and-Machining-Books http://www.ploughbooksales.com.au/003472.htm

I have a copy of it and I believe it is one of the best general purpose books currently available...

John Stevenson
02-03-2010, 04:17 PM
Isn't that the one that oldtiffie sometimes posts pages from? Seems like a good source of info to me.

No thats Tiffiepedia :rolleyes:

.

aboard_epsilon
02-03-2010, 04:46 PM
i have the zues ..
but dont use it

i use this web site all the time

will be lost when it finishes

http://www.gewinde-normen.de/en/index.html

ps everything is in MM even for imperial

which suits me just great

all the best.mark

loose nut
02-03-2010, 06:56 PM
Just Google BA, BSW and BSF threads and you will get lots of info.

LES A W HARRIS
02-03-2010, 11:26 PM
http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e97/CURVIC9/ZEUS%201961/collage.jpg

Zeus was 28 pages including covers, it fit in ones pocket, Log & trig tables, basic screw data, bolt hole patterns, tapers etc, you could get oil coolant on it & wipe it clean, MHB 2500+ pages, my 19th got wet it's about 5" wide closed now! Definitely will not fit in pocket!

Cheers,

lazlo
02-04-2010, 12:59 AM
i use this web site all the time

http://www.gewinde-normen.de/en/index.html

That's a great web page. Never heard of a glass thread before.

John Stevenson
02-04-2010, 02:47 AM
I have come to the conclusion that there isn't a good book out there to suit everyone because we all want something different.

I have started my own using one of those clear cover books with 40 pages in them so doubling up gives you 80 sheets.

I have a decimal equivelant chart at the front and back, reversed so no matter which way i pick the book up I have the chart the right way.

Even these are different as one has information on it the other doesn't and is laid out different so it proves you can't even please one person :D

Next page in has frame sizes and shaft sizes of all the popular metric framed motors as this is what I do the most followed by tables of keyways. Probably no one else on this planet would want the motor information in a data book ?

.

form_change
02-04-2010, 05:05 AM
Thanks John - I hadn't thought of assembling my own. Why I don't know as I already have a sleeved folder for my instruction manuals/ pamphlets and another with a lathe manual and spare parts book in it.
The world wide book of threads might be worth chasing too.
I try to avoid internet pages as data sources as I'm trying to keep the shed computer free for as long as possible. CNC is very nice I'm sure but takes destroying tooling from an art form to something that can be clinically repeated for ever with the right program...

John Stevenson
02-04-2010, 07:23 AM
I still walk about with a Zeus book in my top pocket but to be honest the type isn't as big as it was 20 years ago :D hence A4 / letter sized suits better now.

.

Glenn Wegman
02-04-2010, 07:27 AM
I have accumulated a 1 1/2" thick loose leaf binder that is absolutely full with thread data that I have downloaded and printed off of the internet. Each page is in a plastic sheet protector and they are catagorized in different sections as far as BSF, BA, Metric, UN, etc.

I also have a Microsoft Word page that contains all of the links to the various sites for thread data that I can use if I don't want to look it up in the book or want to print out a specific page if needed.

lazlo
02-04-2010, 10:38 AM
I have come to the conclusion that there isn't a good book out there to suit everyone because we all want something different.

Agree, of course, but someone here recommended the DaVinci book (Australian, I think, but I have the Imperial version), and it's excellent. Small, concise, covers 99% of what I do in the shop, and it's printed on oil-resistant paper.

BobWarfield
02-04-2010, 10:44 AM
Started out making a binder, went to spreadsheets, and then finally wrote a software program (G-Wizard). I still collect the books and I collect bookmarks to useful Internet pages. There is always something more.

Anything I had to spend a fair amount of time to find on Google is something I will make sure is easier the next time.

Cheers,

BW