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View Full Version : O.T. Is there a formula for changing ft.lb.into inch



RichardG
02-04-2010, 02:18 AM
Looking for a way to change formula foot lbs. into inch lbs my motor cycle owner's manual has some parts that require 2.6 foot lbs my tork wrench doesen't go anywhere near that low. I have and inch lbs tork wrench. Or do they make something that actualy goes that low? A lot of the bolts and such range from 16 ft.lbs. down to 2.6.
Thanks in advance Richard

dp
02-04-2010, 02:22 AM
One foot pound is 12 inch pounds. You just multiply by 12.

Machinist-Guide
02-04-2010, 02:30 AM
Multiply the foot lbs. by 12 this will give you inch pounds.
2.6 foot lbs. = 31.2 inch lbs.

tumutbound
02-04-2010, 03:24 AM
I've found this calculato (http://www.linengineering.com/flash/Calculator.swf)r useful.

gmatov
02-04-2010, 03:43 AM
Actually, this question is kinda dumb. Inch, foot, what is to calculate?

Inch, foot, 84 inch pounds, divide by seven, you got 7 foot pounds.

We got LOTS of pipple who never learned their onesies and twosies.

My God, are my Grands gonna grow up that dumb?

I actually know a decent mech who asked me how do you figure 84 inch pounds on a Chevy 3.8 intake manifold's screws.

Younkers are flat out dumb. I wonder if that can be because or GW Bush and "No Child's Behind's Left"?

Cheers,

George

winchman
02-04-2010, 04:36 AM
"Actually, this question is kinda dumb."

I disagree. It's a good question, but it's something that should have been answered for Richard before now and somewhere else. I've encountered lots of kids in the welding classes that cannot read a tape measure or ruler, which is something most of us take for granted.

The South Carolina public schools I attended in the '50s and '60s may not have prepared me well for higher math and science, but I certainly learned how to read, write, do arithmetic, and most other things needed for getting along in life.

Kibby
02-04-2010, 04:53 AM
There's no such thing as a dumb question. If you can't ask it here - among friends - where can you ask it?

RichardG: Do you have a Machinery's Handbook? Well worth the expense of picking up a copy, even if you get a used one. ;)

jacampb2
02-04-2010, 05:13 AM
Actually, this question is kinda dumb. Inch, foot, what is to calculate?

Inch, foot, 84 inch pounds, divide by seven, you got 7 foot pounds.

We got LOTS of pipple who never learned their onesies and twosies.

My God, are my Grands gonna grow up that dumb?

I actually know a decent mech who asked me how do you figure 84 inch pounds on a Chevy 3.8 intake manifold's screws.

Younkers are flat out dumb. I wonder if that can be because or GW Bush and "No Child's Behind's Left"?

Cheers,

George

Great attitude to have there bud! Especially since your math doesn't work out worth a sh!t. 84 divided by 7 comes out to 12.

Granted if the OP had thought it through, the answer may have come to him, but then again, maybe not. Even simple math is not always immediately evident to all. I would rather ask an obvious question and make sure I get things right than not be 100% certain and screw something up. Just the other night I had to use an online calculator to convert oz/in to lb/ft just to double check my math.

It appears that you should consider using a calculator to double check your math as well, the old cogs seem to be slipping Gramps.

Later,
Jason

Furnace
02-04-2010, 07:58 AM
And I wonder why some people don't ask questions or show their projects. I don't because I would rather keep them to myself instead of parading them around in front of a dick like you. Patience isn't a virtue keeping sh*t like that to yourself is.

websterz
02-04-2010, 08:32 AM
Great attitude to have there bud! Especially since your math doesn't work out worth a sh!t. 84 divided by 7 comes out to 12.

Granted if the OP had thought it through, the answer may have come to him, but then again, maybe not. Even simple math is not always immediately evident to all. I would rather ask an obvious question and make sure I get things right than not be 100% certain and screw something up. Just the other night I had to use an online calculator to convert oz/in to lb/ft just to double check my math.

It appears that you should consider using a calculator to double check your math as well, the old cogs seem to be slipping Gramps.

Later,
Jason

Sooo...you were born an a$$hole and just got bigger I presume?

CountZero
02-04-2010, 08:36 AM
An alternative is just to ask google "2.6 ft/lbs in in/lbs"

I know how to do the math but are far too lazy to learn how many inch per foot...

Edit: Google can calculate many other things as well

Evan
02-04-2010, 08:44 AM
George is a semi-pro curmudgeon. Don't take it personally, he treats everybody equally.

MotorradMike
02-04-2010, 08:59 AM
So Richard.

Does your smaller torque wrench handle 31.2 inch pounds?


Mike

Mcgyver
02-04-2010, 09:53 AM
Looking for a way to change formula foot lbs. into inch lbs my motor cycle owner's manual has some parts that require 2.6 foot lbs my tork wrench doesen't go anywhere near that low. I have and inch lbs tork wrench. Or do they make something that actualy goes that low? A lot of the bolts and such range from 16 ft.lbs. down to 2.6.
Thanks in advance Richard

I'd bet the OP doesn't have an issue multiplying by 12 but just wasn't sure what units of torque actually were. Don't let the nastiness dissuade you from asking, that's the point of all this - to learn.

if you had a long wrench sticking out sideways and on a bolt....and you put a one pound weight on, 1 foot out; thats a foot/pound. Same as 12 inch pounds. If you put 3 pounds on it you've got 3 foot pounds. If you put one pound on it, 3' out, that's also three foot pounds. T=force * distance, and going from inches to feet is just a factor of 12.


Torque is a specification given for fasteners of all sizes, not just head bolts. You'll find torque specs in production for all sized fasteners. For example there are small torque measure devices that are like screw drivers for small fasteners in say electronics to even finer ones like these

http://www.hoskin.qc.ca/uploadpdf/Instrumentation/Honeywell%20Sensotec/hoskin_torquewatch40ca04e5c88d9.pdf

J Tiers
02-04-2010, 09:56 AM
The problem isn't KNOWING things like this........

The problem is in not being taught how to THINK about it. Education has failed the public, and it started a long time ago.

Blaming Bush is popular, an easy brush-off that "answers the issue" with words that some like to say, but it's wrong..... Just jingoistic bullcrap for those who don't enjoy thinking very much.

The educational system is no longer trying to teach this stuff. It wasn't trying when I was taught math. I was in what is now "middle school" when the "new math" came in, and it was trash...... probably because the teachers didn't know what to do with it. The difference between the prior practical application method of teaching, and the new "theory first" method was very obvious. Nearly nobody was anywhere near as interested in math theory as the educational eggheads wanted them to be, so they started off bored, and learned nearly nothing.

EDIT: The textbook folks apparently forgot the notion that math is a tool, and so the theory became so separated from actual usage that the fact that it was at all useful got lost. It was very difficult to make geometry non-physical and so geometry got more interest from many people than "set theory" and "number theory", which were pushed up into the math program almost before arithmetic, apparently as a ploy to drive students away from math, science, and engineering.

Now that it is more important to 'feel good" about understanding nothing than to actually understand anything, I doubt it's any better.

anyway....

Units of any sort are not unrelated to each other, they have some relation, an inch is 2.54 CM, 25.4 mm, etc. And of course, a "foot" is 12 inches.

So if you have something in mm, and you want inches, you figure there is a "factor" of 25.4 in there somewhere. Then, since you MULTIPLY inches by 25.4 to get mm, it figures that you DIVIDE by 25.4 to get inches from mm.

All these things start by knowing that there is a relationship, and so there must be a conversion, and then reasoning out what it should be, based on the relationship of the units.

Some may argue that they wouldn't know which was right.... but if you start figuring these things out, pretty soon you realize that the correct conversion is actually fairly obvious. So the correct answer can be known, even without anyone else telling you it is right.

Math is only a tool.

Lew Hartswick
02-04-2010, 10:02 AM
I was going to reply to this thread and then decided it would just upset
one group or the other so gave up and decided not to. :-)
...Lew...

Evan
02-04-2010, 10:26 AM
I don't see inch pounds very often but inch ounces are how most small motors are specified. That just adds another multiplier to convert to foot pounds, 16 x 12 = 192 inch oz to the ft lb.

A.K. Boomer
02-04-2010, 10:58 AM
Great attitude to have there bud! Especially since your math doesn't work out worth a sh!t. 84 divided by 7 comes out to 12.

Granted if the OP had thought it through, the answer may have come to him, but then again, maybe not. Even simple math is not always immediately evident to all. I would rather ask an obvious question and make sure I get things right than not be 100% certain and screw something up. Just the other night I had to use an online calculator to convert oz/in to lb/ft just to double check my math.

It appears that you should consider using a calculator to double check your math as well, the old cogs seem to be slipping Gramps.

Later,
Jason


All the calculators in the world wont help you if you miss details in the equation,
If your going to critique someone else you better not make any errors yourself --- He may very well have gotten the math wrong but you repeat his mistake of dividing 84 by 7,,, why the hell are you doing that when the 84 is the inch pounds? There's 12 inches in a foot:rolleyes: Its 84 divided by 12 which actually gives you his final answer of 7 ft pounds (how he got there god only knows)

Now,, that's a lesson for you in critiquing ------- allot less harsher than either of you and also being correct -- it's called getting your point across with a touch of class...

atty
02-04-2010, 11:08 AM
I think McGyver nailed it. There is nothing to indicate that Richard wasn't taught 12 inches to a foot at some point in his life, but his original question was how to convert ft lbs to inch lbs. I'll wager there are not many of us that hit that conversion in elementary school. While a good "common sense" guess might well be 12 inch/lbs to a foot lb., why not ask first. For all he knew it could have been pi X ft. lbs. :mad:

dp
02-04-2010, 11:15 AM
I think McGyver nailed it. There is nothing to indicate that Richard wasn't taught 12 inches to a foot at some point in his life, but his original question was how to convert ft lbs to inch lbs. I'll wager there are not many of us that hit that conversion in elementary school. While a good "common sense" guess might well be 12 inch/lbs to a foot lb., why not ask first. For all he knew it could have been pi X ft. lbs. :mad:

Some people would rather be right than helpful. Others see this as opportunity to be seen as even more right. This thread is going to run into multiple pages even though the OP was answered simply and non-judgmentally in #2.

flutedchamber
02-04-2010, 11:18 AM
Actually, this question is kinda dumb. Inch, foot, what is to calculate?

Inch, foot, 84 inch pounds, divide by seven, you got 7 foot pounds.

We got LOTS of pipple who never learned their onesies and twosies.

My God, are my Grands gonna grow up that dumb?

I actually know a decent mech who asked me how do you figure 84 inch pounds on a Chevy 3.8 intake manifold's screws.

Younkers are flat out dumb. I wonder if that can be because or GW Bush and "No Child's Behind's Left"?

Cheers,

George

"because OR" "No Child's Behind's Left"

At least the person who posted the question knew how to spell. Perhaps YOU are a product of the 'no idiot left behind' program, or English is a second language for you?:D

radkins
02-04-2010, 11:21 AM
Wow, I find the response to this kind of hard to believe! The guy had a simple question so why not just give a simple answer? I have heard that asked more than once and if a person has never had a need to even think about it before it is easy to assume that there may be more to it than simply just dividing by 12, asking how to do it was NOT DUMB! Just assuming something without knowing and causing an expensive failure because of NOT ASKING is dumb!

dp
02-04-2010, 12:01 PM
In other words there are no stupid questions, only stupid answers :p

radkins
02-04-2010, 12:29 PM
I was helping a guy at work one night get his pick up truck ready to haul a small load of coal and being concerned about the truck's ability to handle the load he asked, serious as could be, "How much does a ton of coal weigh"? :)

gnm109
02-04-2010, 12:34 PM
Actually, this question is kinda dumb. Inch, foot, what is to calculate?

Inch, foot, 84 inch pounds, divide by seven, you got 7 foot pounds.

We got LOTS of pipple who never learned their onesies and twosies.

My God, are my Grands gonna grow up that dumb?

I actually know a decent mech who asked me how do you figure 84 inch pounds on a Chevy 3.8 intake manifold's screws.

Younkers are flat out dumb. I wonder if that can be because or GW Bush and "No Child's Behind's Left"?

Cheers,

George


Some of us use poor grammar and cannot spell. How about a program for "No machinist left behind".


.

RichardG
02-04-2010, 01:09 PM
Thanks for all the replies at 67 I some times have brain lock . And for the curmudgeons among us ,well theres one in every group.
Richard

kyfho
02-04-2010, 02:07 PM
More than one around here. You're just scratching the surface. Each has their own HOT button.

vpt
02-04-2010, 02:28 PM
LOL

OP: questioned asked

2nd post: question answered

next 24 posts: arguing about each others posts.

RKW
02-04-2010, 02:29 PM
As far as units go, this is the way I was shown from a physics professor many years ago. Just put everything into equation form like below including the units you are trying to get. Just make sure everything in each section of the equation matches up.

For example, ft/lbs in the first "section" and then the next section containing the inch value you desire with its equivalent value below it 1 foot. From here you can just cancel out the similar values like in a fraction (ft) and you are left with just multiplying straight across 2.6 * 12.

Makes these sorts of things *much* easier.


2.6 ft | 12 in
------------------
lbs | 1 ft

A.K. Boomer
02-04-2010, 02:37 PM
I was helping a guy at work one night get his pick up truck ready to haul a small load of coal and being concerned about the truck's ability to handle the load he asked, serious as could be, "How much does a ton of coal weigh"? :)



What nationality is he? Was he ever in the Navy?

Point being is even with something like this that to some seems obvious there are still things to learn,

A Short Ton weighs 2,000lbs

A long Ton (or a metric ton) weights 2,240 lbs

A European generally uses the metric system --- also a US Navy ship is gauged in long tons.

So I guess what im asking is what country of origin was the truck from:p

Thruthefence
02-04-2010, 02:38 PM
Just don't ask George about Serbia's struggle with the Ottoman Turks.

garagemark
02-04-2010, 02:46 PM
I don't even see a problem in the "what does a ton weigh?" question. Sure, most of us who are mechanically inclined or mathematically inclined would easily know the answer to that question. But I assure you there are literally millions of people who do not know the answer. Why would most people NEED to know what a ton is. TON is not an actual number, it is a word. Hell, one of the national TV commercials (Fox) abbreviates the word 'tonight' with the word 'ton' when advertising the evening's schedule. I doubt if we're going to get two thousand pounds of shows. Hmmm… Maybe 2000 pounds of BS though.

We cannot all be superior. If we were, you would no longer be.

vpt
02-04-2010, 02:50 PM
Well if you don't know what a ton is and your driving a truck with 3 tons loaded over the rear axle down a road with a 2 ton weight limit bridge you will soon learn what a ton is.

tdmidget
02-04-2010, 02:52 PM
No A.K. a metric ton is 2204.6 lbs.

gnm109
02-04-2010, 06:00 PM
No A.K. a metric ton is 2204.6 lbs.


Yes and it's also very close to 1000 kilos.

camdigger
02-04-2010, 06:15 PM
OK,

Short ton 2000 lbs
Long ton 2204 lbs

What is a tonne? NOT a spelling error, BTW.

Fasttrack
02-04-2010, 06:22 PM
OK,

Short ton 2000 lbs
Long ton 2204 lbs

What is a tonne? NOT a spelling error, BTW.


1 tonne is 1 metric ton or 1000 kilograms or ~ 2204.62 lbs
1 long ton is 2240 as AK said.

1 long ton DOES NOT equal 1 metric ton

JMS6449
02-04-2010, 06:27 PM
George is a semi-pro curmudgeon. Don't take it personally, he treats everybody equally.

What's wrong with being a curmudgeon or a$$hole - it fun.

ligito
02-04-2010, 06:50 PM
What's wrong with being a curmudgeon or a$$hole - it fun.

Don't you mean "It's fun"?:p

J.Ramsey
02-04-2010, 07:03 PM
You all sure know how to confuse a guy, so which weighs more a ton of lead or a ton of feathers.

JMS6449
02-04-2010, 07:05 PM
You all sure know how to confuse a guy, so which weighs more a ton of lead or a ton of feathers.

All the bull$hit from these a$$holes.

MotorradMike
02-04-2010, 07:30 PM
Actually, tons are pretty confusing because there are so many different definitions:
Short ton
Long ton
Metric ton

And all those over again spelled tonne.

And don't get me started on half ton trucks. NONE of those weigh in at half a ton regardless of which one you use.

The poor guy who asked the original question has gone right?

camdigger
02-04-2010, 07:30 PM
You all sure know how to confuse a guy, so which weighs more a ton of lead or a ton of feathers.

Complicated by the long ton, short ton, and metric ton (tonne) confusion.:D

'Course, it may depend on whether the feathers are still attached to the bird.:D :D

JanvanSaane
02-04-2010, 07:35 PM
Maybe I missed something here, multiply the ft lbs by 12 to get inch,, but If you have an inch lb torque wrench it probably only goes to 150 in lbs, the foot lb torque wrench will start at 20 or 30 ft lbs. I used to do A/T work, I also have a 3/8s torque wrench that covers the gap, it goes from 5 ft lbs (60 in lbs) to 30 ft (360 in lbs). You can never have too many tools. I could read the post either way, but I just got home from a 12 hour shift, may be a little foggier than usual. John

jacampb2
02-04-2010, 08:43 PM
All the calculators in the world wont help you if you miss details in the equation,
If your going to critique someone else you better not make any errors yourself --- He may very well have gotten the math wrong but you repeat his mistake of dividing 84 by 7,,, why the hell are you doing that when the 84 is the inch pounds? There's 12 inches in a foot:rolleyes: Its 84 divided by 12 which actually gives you his final answer of 7 ft pounds (how he got there god only knows)

Now,, that's a lesson for you in critiquing ------- allot less harsher than either of you and also being correct -- it's called getting your point across with a touch of class...

No kidding?

Notice I did not include his units in my reply, not only does the math not work out, but neither do the units. I had started to, and then I realized that even if I corrected the math, I had no idea what imaginary units the answer would be in. I figured the prior posts had made it quite clear how to properly convert it, and there was no need.

I am sure that George just made a typo, or had a brain fart, but I also take offense to someone trying to say that everyone in a younger generation is just plain dumb.

So, here is a lesson in reading ------ don't read more into something than what is there :D

Later,
Jason

doctor demo
02-04-2010, 09:01 PM
It's a good thing that we don't use ''Chains'' and "Rods" unit of measure .
Can You picture some Guy wanting to know the formula to convert Chain Pounds to Link Pounds or Rod Pounds to Rod Ounces? There would have to be a fifteen page thread for all the arguing that would take place.:eek:


Steve:D

Evan
02-04-2010, 10:06 PM
Ya missed a ton Camdigger. 1 troy ton = 1568 hansard lb. :D

Not to mention:

1 troy blank = 1/230400 grain
1 troy perit = 24 troy blanks (1/9600 gr.)
1 troy dwit = 20 troy perits (1/480 gr.)
1 troy myte = 24 troy dwits (1/20 gr.)
1 troy pearl-barley = 1/576 troy oz. (5/6 gr.) (1 troy pot-barley)
1 grain = 20 troy my.
1 troy carat = 4 troy p-b. (3 1/3 gr.)
1 troy pennyweight = 24 gr. ("wt." is 24 gr., not 23 gr. or 22.5 gr. or 22.2 gr.)
1 troy ounce = 20 troy dwt. (144 troy ct.)
1 merc. cup = 8 troy oz. (1152 troy ct.) (1 merc. mark (mk.))
1 troy pound = 12 troy oz. (1728 troy ct.)
1 troy lb. = 5760 gr.
1 troy lb. = original transferred from UK Royal Mint to US Treasury Dept. July 28th 1827
1 troy clove = 7 troy lb.
1 troy nailweight = 8 troy lb. ("wt." 1/14 troy cwt., not 1/16 troy cwt.)
1 troy nwt. = 12 merc. cups
1 troy stone (st.) = 2 troy cloves
1 troy tod = 2 troy st. (1 merc.score"wt." = 21 merc.lb., not 20 merc.lb.)
1 troy frail = 2 troy tods
1 troy fotmal = 5 troy st. (1 long frail)
1 troy anker = 7 troy st.
1 troy hundredwt. (cwt.) = 2 troy frails ("wt." 112 troy lb., not 100 troy lb.)
assay troy ton @ 1 troy oz. = no. troy oz. gold or silver that 29400 troy oz. gold or silver ore will produce
assay troy ton @ 1 troy oz. = no. parts wt. gold or silver that 29400 parts wt. gold or silver ore will produce
1 troy ton = 25 troy ankers (7 av.oct.) (35 troy fotmals) (29400 troy oz.)
1 troy ton = 1470 tron lb.
1 troy ton = 1568 hansard lb.
1 troy ton = 1837 1/2 merchant lb.
1 troy ton = 1960 long lb.
1 troy ton = 2016 av.lb. (fl. measure & gold & silver)

radkins
02-04-2010, 10:11 PM
Duuh,,, How long is a piece of string?

.RC.
02-04-2010, 10:19 PM
Duuh,,, How long is a piece of string?

Twice half it's length...

But some realy dumb things I have noticed...

The US going it's own way, inventing it's own measuring system, then using the same name as the standard at the time... Yes, I am talking about the Gallon... or the US gallon which is different to the imperial gallon... retardedness at it's best...

The other interesting point I would make is ft/lb is a force.. weight where it is derived from isn't.. meaning there is no quantifiable standard called a pound... A pound weight at sea level weighs more then a pound on mount everest due to the force of gravity being less on mount everest..

J.Ramsey
02-04-2010, 10:23 PM
Dang you guys keep confusing me even more.

Anybody ever heard of a henweigh?

dp
02-04-2010, 10:26 PM
Duuh,,, How long is a piece of string?

Dunno how long a string is, but this thread is running toward 4 pages rather quickly.

doctor demo
02-05-2010, 12:14 AM
Dang you guys keep confusing me even more.

Anybody ever heard of a henweigh?
Yes, and it rolls off the tongue better than a Turkeyweigh :D

Steve

oldtiffie
02-05-2010, 12:44 AM
And when a ship weighs anchor the weight is ........................... ?

Or when you have learned something and have it weighed-off its weight is .................. ?

And when you are held up in traffic etc. does your weight really matter - or is it really matter? ...................... really ?

Etc.

The most useful and concise conversion factors between units and inch to metric and reverse are in the pages just inside the front and back covers of (my copy of) Machinery's Handbook (27).

The answer to the OP's in-pound to ft-pound is inside the front cover - on the far left about mid-height.

Weston Bye
02-05-2010, 07:09 AM
"A pint is a pound
the world around"

I heard this once, and it makes sense as water weighs in at 8lbs/gal. (approx)

By that measure, a bladderful works out to about a pound. Try a before and after measurement for yourself.:D