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Weston Bye
02-06-2010, 04:01 PM
In the course of building prototype parts at work, we needed some 800 terminals. These were intended to crimp onto the end of a stranded leadwire, and then be soldered onto a coil terminal pin. It fell to me to design the connector, but jobbing the limited production out in the timeframe we needed was a problem, so I tooled up and made them myself in my home shop.

.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/A.jpg

Blanking out the parts was a simple parting operation. The 3mm tubing was held in a collet and fed to a spacer block, temporarily held in between the part and a piece of rod held in a fixed position in the tailstock chuck.

.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/B.jpg

The spacer was removed and the parting tool (from A.R.Warner, HSSMike on this BBS) was advanced on the cross slide.

.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/C.jpg

Weston Bye
02-06-2010, 04:02 PM
Where we were using the connector, a clearance issue arose near where it soldered onto the coil pin, so I needed to round the end of the connector. I did this with a simple forming die. The die was made by plunging a ball nose endmill to the required depth into a steel block. A small hole was drilled through to the bottom to allow a pin to eject the formed part. The forming operation amounted to pushing the brass tube with an arbor press into the hole, flush with the top surface.

.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/D.jpg

The proof-of-concept parts didn’t have this rolled feature and would have been easier to produce. My original plan was to cross drill the small holes and then part off. I tried forming after drilling, but the forming operation just closed up the holes.


Cross drilling was done on the lathe with a drilling spindle I built for the project. The spindle quill was patterned after a Dremel quill, accepting Dremel collets and chucks. The DC motor came out of a scrapped electric Jeep made for children. (An improved version of this spindle is planned as an article in one of the magazines)

.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/E.jpg

.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/F.jpg

The drilling spindle was mounted 90 to the lathe spindle. A block, mounted on the tool post, in proper relationship with the drill, served as a feed stop.

Weston Bye
02-06-2010, 04:04 PM
Drilling the part involved chucking the part in a drill chuck mounted in the lathe spindle and rotating the spindle to align the pulley with an index mark, bringing the feed stop into contact with the part, then advancing the drill with the cross slide. The drill was returned, and the lathe spindle was rotated 180 to another index mark and the drilling process was repeated.

.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/G.jpg

.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/H.jpg

. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/I.jpg

I used the pilot of a center drill for drilling the hole as it was stubby and rigid and did not deflect.

Your Old Dog
02-06-2010, 04:52 PM
Interesting project Weston. Thanks for the post and pics. How long did it take you to make 800?

kyfho
02-06-2010, 05:44 PM
I agree, very interesting.

Also wondering how long it took, and um, were you compensated for all your extra work? I only ask because I have done widget work on the weekend for my day job, but since I was salaried, nothing was ever said about additional compensation or even a simple "Good job, thanks". Soon it kind of came to be expected. As soon as I could, I left that company, went on hourly pay, and never looked back. Now if I do "extra" work, it's on the clock. Even if it's at home.

Weston Bye
02-06-2010, 06:09 PM
Actual production time amounted to about 16 hours. there was probably another 4-5 hours of setup and cleanup, etc. I worked at home during business hours.

I am on salary. I try to do the work during business hours, but do occasionally work an evening or weekend. Things tend to balance out pretty well, as my boss is pretty good about time off for doctor appointments and such.

Robo
02-06-2010, 07:20 PM
Actual production time amounted to about 16 hours. there was probably another 4-5 hours of setup and cleanup, etc. I worked at home during business hours.

I am on salary. I try to do the work during business hours, but do occasionally work an evening or weekend. Things tend to balance out pretty well, as my boss is pretty good about time off for doctor appointments and such.

I didn't think there were any good bosses left in this area:) Nice project appreciate the write up!

ARFF79
02-06-2010, 11:26 PM
I like your drill. I have the same thing only it was made by Browne & Sharpe. It is a common attachment for a screw machine, and can be used for milling as well. Set 90* to the spindle and it can be used as a cut off saw.

gda
02-06-2010, 11:39 PM
Nice job and story. I had not seen the use of a spacer block on an end stop - good tip right there.

When did the job stop getting exciting - around piece 87 or so?

Peter.
02-07-2010, 06:14 AM
Cool job Weston!

lazlo
02-07-2010, 10:32 AM
Nice job Wes!

I gather you couldn't find a commercial equivalent, or you couldn't get them in time?

DeereGuy
02-07-2010, 11:53 AM
Just stumbled on this thread Weston...nice job.

BTW did you every get your filing machine up and running?

Weston Bye
02-07-2010, 12:40 PM
gda- I was surprised, it went OK. I don't enjoy repetitive work, but I set things up with a comfortable chair, proper working height, and talk radio to listen to (some would say: to numb my mind) while I worked and got through it.

Lazlo- No indeed, there were no commercial or off-the-shelf equivalents available, and nothing that could have been adapted any easier than building from scratch. After I finished them we sent them out for tin over nickel plating.

Bob- The die filer still waits. work on magazine articles, projects like this, and a few others have crowded it out.

I will try to post some pictures of the terminals in the application in a day or two.

Paul Alciatore
02-07-2010, 12:41 PM
I didn't think there were any good bosses left in this area:) Nice project appreciate the write up!


They are all being trained not to be. First the company promotes or hires the worst possible candidates for managers. Then they hear all the complaints so they hire a training firm to come in and give classes in "good management" or some buzz word that is currently in vogue. Of course, the company (upper management and owners) never monitors what they are being taught. The result is a bunch of zombie managers who are convinced that they are doing what the company wants. What the company demands.

Actually they are ruining the company from within. They destroy innovation. They punish any attempt at improvement from below. They crush any deviation from the norm.

Then the company (and those managers also) wonders why they are always beat out by the competition.

I know that the company I am presently working for would think I was only describing them in this rant. But the truth is, even though they are guilty, they are perhaps one of the better ones in this insanity. I have seen this in company after company. I have to wonder how does a person, who is so stupid as to fall for this, ever get to be a CEO?

Paul Alciatore
02-07-2010, 12:46 PM
I also have done small production runs of parts for my company. I am salaried and "not permitted to work at home" so there is no way I can do it on company time. Therefore, I don't do it unless I have a signed purchase order in my hand that is made out to my company. This works great. They pay my price.

DR
02-07-2010, 01:38 PM
Weston,

Any reason you couldn't have drilled in the same setting as parting off?

Can you give us some indication of the per part price?

Weston Bye
02-07-2010, 02:39 PM
Weston,

Any reason you couldn't have drilled in the same setting as parting off?

Can you give us some indication of the per part price?

I quote myself from post #2: " My original plan was to cross drill the small holes and then part off. I tried forming after drilling, but the forming operation just closed up the holes."

The president of the company asked what the cost worked out per part. I told him about $1 each. This was figuring an engineer's pay scale and overhead. Seems high, but I saved the cost of producing engineering drawings for quoting, purchasing agent time spent getting quotes, the actual cost of a purchased part, shipping & handling, etc. Not unreasonable for rush prototypes.

38_Cal
02-07-2010, 02:46 PM
They are all being trained not to be. First the company promotes or hires the worst possible candidates for managers. Then they hear all the complaints so they hire a training firm to come in and give classes in "good management" or some buzz word that is currently in vogue. Of course, the company (upper management and owners) never monitors what they are being taught. The result is a bunch of zombie managers who are convinced that they are doing what the company wants. What the company demands.

Actually they are ruining the company from within. They destroy innovation. They punish any attempt at improvement from below. They crush any deviation from the norm.

Then the company (and those managers also) wonders why they are always beat out by the competition.

I know that the company I am presently working for would think I was only describing them in this rant. But the truth is, even though they are guilty, they are perhaps one of the better ones in this insanity. I have seen this in company after company. I have to wonder how does a person, who is so stupid as to fall for this, ever get to be a CEO?

They get an MBA from the U of I...like my former employer's son (now prez of the company) did...they decide to get "wages in line with similar jobs" for my department...then get rid of those whose wages were quite a bit above "average". Did not matter how many products you designed/invented/found for the firm, or that you were their biggest cheerleader when out with the public.

I'm not bitter, just still unemployed after two years and counting.

David

oil mac
02-07-2010, 03:53 PM
Good job Weston, I was most interested to see you getting 1st. class work out of a little Sherline, These seem to be excellent little machine tools for their size, One of my associates has one and swears by it for tiny work
As regards doing work for an employer at home, One is lucky if good fortune gives you a management structure, which either a) Rewards your effort, either by time off or some renumeration , such as payment in kind.
or alternative b) Giving one credit for ones effort in keeping the show on the road, in the case of a task which does not last say anymore than say one hour
I will give an example of a set up i worked for some years ago, The management sucked from top to bottom big time, a**e holes everyone of them however back to the gist of the story, When ever anything came up out of the ordinary,by that i mean ,Something beyond the comprehension of the "experts"tiny minds, or their limited manual dexterity, or beyond the scope of their beat up machinery, Your obedient servant, would invariably open his mouth and volunteer his services, usually this would be a cold night spent in my then freezing workshop, when i could have been sitting with a good book After a few rather good repairs or manufactured components, of which i obtained a degree of satisfaction pulling my employers out of the goo doing, I tackled one project, which i started at 6-30 pm at home after work continued to 3am, Went to bed for some hours of sleep got up early and continued the work during my breakfast (eaten on the job, --Wife almost stuffing the grub into my mouth as the lathe buzzed round), finished the fitting on the damned thing, Went into work about one & a half hour late to one holy row, Was told, Never do that again ! It would seem the jealous brigade had been at it, Behind my back. Grim, Considering the job from me was no cost to these guys.
The result was they killed the goose that laid the golden eggs Big Time ! Completely destroyed any degree of initiative i had , Future small repairs etc, were subbed out to their pals, And well, One can visualise the downtime and the hack work recieved, at high costs.
There still is good small firms where initiative and going the extra mile is appreciated, both by management and reciprocally the workers, But they are in todays climate sadly getting less.
Weston, we are looking forward to seeing more nice things from the good team of you and your little Sherline, Thanks for sharing.

DR
02-07-2010, 04:33 PM
.................................................. ..........
The president of the company asked what the cost worked out per part. I told him about $1 each. This was figuring an engineer's pay scale and overhead. Seems high, but I saved the cost of producing engineering drawings for quoting, purchasing agent time spent getting quotes, the actual cost of a purchased part, shipping & handling, etc. Not unreasonable for rush prototypes.



In my shop we did this type work for years, simple repetitive parts that is.

A buck each is not out of line at all.

Weston Bye
02-08-2010, 07:30 PM
Here are the terminals after a trip to the plater. Shiney! I like shiney.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/DSCN3428.jpg

And attached to the coil, ready for solder.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/DSCN3425.jpg

camdigger
02-08-2010, 08:02 PM
Them's purty!;)

Well done!

Robo
02-08-2010, 09:15 PM
They are all being trained not to be. First the company promotes or hires the worst possible candidates for managers. Then they hear all the complaints so they hire a training firm to come in and give classes in "good management" or some buzz word that is currently in vogue. Of course, the company (upper management and owners) never monitors what they are being taught. The result is a bunch of zombie managers who are convinced that they are doing what the company wants. What the company demands.

Actually they are ruining the company from within. They destroy innovation. They punish any attempt at improvement from below. They crush any deviation from the norm.

Then the company (and those managers also) wonders why they are always beat out by the competition.

I know that the company I am presently working for would think I was only describing them in this rant. But the truth is, even though they are guilty, they are perhaps one of the better ones in this insanity. I have seen this in company after company. I have to wonder how does a person, who is so stupid as to fall for this, ever get to be a CEO?

Although not any consolation its good to hear it from someone else. It is beyond my comprehension how things have gotten this outta hand....sorry for the brief hyjack back to the thread.