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JasonW
02-18-2002, 02:59 PM
Just bought a new milling machine, RF45. Best I could find locally, at a resonable price. Because I am new, I was wondering if anyone knows of some good milling machine books. Still waiting for my Amateurs lathe book. Still on back order.

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SGW
02-18-2002, 04:51 PM
One that comes to mind is "Vertical Milling in the Home Shop" by Arnold Throp. It will certainly get you going. It's a British book, so you may have trouble finding it.

docn8as
02-18-2002, 07:11 PM
machine tool operation vol 2...1922 on any edition .. henry burghardt ....milling .shaper ..planing .horizontal,but principles all the same .just turn ur head 90 deg. also vol 1 lathe /bench ..on ebay once in a while or used dealer $10-15 .the kind of basic stuff needed for new hsm's lindsey sells for 28.50 a book by Smith ..advanced machine???...every operation u will do is described ...a bible ..he was machine shop prof. @ MIT ......burghardt was supervisor of highschool shops in Jersey.. too many modern texts are geared to industrial application..... check out used book stores for 1920's stuff!!!
best wishes
docn8as

bdarin
02-18-2002, 10:39 PM
I learned a LOT reading "Tabletop Machining". Author's name escapes me but he owns Sherline. Obviously all the equipment in the book is Sherline, but the principles are the same for all machines. Excellent book.

RPease
02-19-2002, 01:06 AM
Author for Tabletop Machining would be Joe Rice. Used to be editor for HSM. It is an excellent book. Often, lots of issues for sale on Ebay, but watch the pricing on Ebay. Most often, it is more economical to buy straight from HSM.

Good luck.

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RPease

Thrud
02-19-2002, 01:19 AM
Joe Martin wrote "Table top machining" - it reads like a Sherline manual, but boy are there some cool models in there (stuff done by his customers) Amazing what you can do with little or nothing if you really have the inclination!

American Machinist manual - Colvin & Stanley
Any of the Brown & Sharpe books
Machinery's Handbook (any version is better than none)

Troll eBay for books, or technical book stores, used book stores - you never know what you might find. The early books are awesome, the old timers did things most of us never could or ever will.

www.lindsaybks.com (http://www.lindsaybks.com) is a good source for reprints - lost of cool stuff.

Only thing to remember is safety should be your #1 priority - don't take chances. If you are unsure of something it is better to err on the side of caution.

One of the best things to get for your mill is a really good vise, maybe a rotary table, a boring head (the boring head should have the same shank as the spindle), and collets for the endmills. Biggest face mill you should use is around 2-3" maximum. Level the machine and bolt it down good.

dave

Dave

Ironman
02-19-2002, 06:38 PM
I've mentioned it here before:A TREATISE ON MILLING--the Cinncinati Milling Machine Co.is the bible on mills.This is the pre-nc way to do anything on a mill.Even grind cams!Very enjoyable.My copy is early 50's.Have fun! Eric in AZ

John Stevenson
02-21-2002, 11:38 AM
Well lads
I've just spent an enjoyable afternoon looking around TEE publishing here in the UK.
http://www.fotec.co.uk/mehs/tee/index.html
I might also add a quite expensive afternoon but then I was spoilt for choice [ grin ]

Whilst I was there I got to see all of the books mentioned earlier in this thread.
The original poster, Jason, obviously a newbie was looking for a suitable book.
Just from experience of using mills and realising what you need to know I would advise the Throp book " Vertical Milling in the home shop" first followed by the A TREATISE ON MILLING--the Cinncinati Milling Machine Co., For more advanced things. I believe this was originally published under the same name by Browne and Sharpe.
I also got to look at the Joe Martin book, very nice, very good quality but it's more a reading book than a text book.

John S.

Randy
02-21-2002, 02:40 PM
I learned a great deal from a college text titled Machine Tool Practices by Kibbe, Neely, Meyer and White. Pretty expensive to buy new, but for $20 I bought a copy that was being replaced (by a newer edition) from the local community college. It's the best of the several textbooks in my library.

Thrud
02-21-2002, 09:55 PM
John
I have a B&S book on milling, 1912 I believe. I have not seen the CM book, but the B&S books are very interesting (I have their gear hobbing book too - way more than I wanted to know about gears!).

The thing I like about Joe Martin's book is that it is solid proof you can do almost anything with nothing if you are determined enough. Much like the models that grace ME pages - where do you guys find the time to do that stuff?

BTW, is there a vendor there that has an excellent set of BA taps & dies you would recommend? I prefer quality HSS sets (I need them for some Stuarts.)

Thanks, Dave

RPease
02-23-2002, 06:44 AM
Dave,

Thanks for the correction on the "author" of Tabletop Machining. I guess I had another "senior moment". I certainly know the difference between Martin and Rice (weren't they a Vaudeville comedy team????), but I suppose the "Joe" part confused me. I didn't recognise my mistake immediately when you mentioned it. I just happened to be thumbing through TM last night and the name "jumped out" at me and I remembered that I used the wrong name.

I'll try to do better next time.

Thanks again, Ro____ [OH MY.....I think I just forgot who I am........ http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif]

Rodger

John Stevenson
02-23-2002, 07:50 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Thrud:
John
I have a B&S book on milling, 1912 I believe. I have not seen the CM book, but the B&S books are very interesting (I have their gear hobbing book too - way more than I wanted to know about gears!).

The thing I like about Joe Martin's book is that it is solid proof you can do almost anything with nothing if you are determined enough. Much like the models that grace ME pages - where do you guys find the time to do that stuff?

Thanks, Dave</font>

Dave,
True there are some great photos of other peoples work but no setups like in the other books or ideas of how they achieved this.
I got the impression it was just a plug for Sherlines and Joe Martin in particular otherwise why the photo of his yatch etc.
As regards for how the Brits have the time for these models most keep off the internet {g}.

Thrud
02-24-2002, 12:17 AM
John

Yes, I thought it read like a Sherline ad myself - explains why the dealer charged me half normal price. I think Joe put his foot in his mouth when he complained about a Autocad book taking hundreds of pages to get to drawing lines - funny, his book does the same thing. As you say, he never really gets around to explaining table top machining. Sounds like an Sherline sale brochure instead.

Except for the odd coma, sleep is not my friend - we have never really gotten along that well. Can't make noise when others are asleep - well I could - but that would be mean! My back is totally buggered, so I cannot spend most of the time doing what I want, just what I can handle. I have a comfy chair, a killer computer (house is networked & firewalled) and time to kill. I will admit though, tool polishing has become a fine art around here - my Starrett planer gauge rods wring together...

That is my excuse, and I am sticking to it!

Dave

[This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 02-24-2002).]