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cuemaker
02-12-2010, 08:05 PM
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/garage1.png

The dog represents my small car..

The doors are in the right spot. All parts are correct size maybe except for an inch here or there.. Yes, my compressor is that big...

Any suggestions on making it better???

Oh, width of garage is wrong, but I am not concerned about it...and I may mount the grinder to a smaller platform, maybe on the rolling bench.

polepenhollow
02-12-2010, 08:14 PM
Move the bandsaw to the garage door so the saw may be angled when needed to run long stock out the open door.
K Liv

Forrest Addy
02-12-2010, 08:25 PM
Move the cars outside. They're painted; they won't rust. Women won't rust either. I mean, what's important here? Machine shop stuff or some dumb cars?

doctor demo
02-12-2010, 08:26 PM
If You can move the compressor outside to a shed or lean-to it will free up space and eliminate noise and the need to clean chips off of and from under it.

Steve

Michael Edwards
02-12-2010, 08:34 PM
There is always the Grizzly workshop planner. Don't know if they have a symbol for the dog though. :D

http://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner.aspx

ME

cuemaker
02-12-2010, 08:39 PM
There is always the Grizzly workshop planner. Don't know if they have a symbol for the dog though. :D

http://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner.aspx

ME

Thats where the above came from..! So yes, they have a dog on there...

Pherdie
02-12-2010, 08:40 PM
My home shop is also in a garage bay. I always keep my tool chest and workbench near the roll up door to make it just a few short steps to support outside projects. Items seeing less infrequent use/access are stored towards the back of the garage in order of usage. It has worked well for me.

Fred

Jim Shaper
02-12-2010, 08:53 PM
You can get a car in there - that means only one thing. You don't have enough machinery. :p

cuemaker
02-12-2010, 09:04 PM
You can get a car in there - that means only one thing. You don't have enough machinery. :p

Amen to what Jim and Forrest say..but its sure nice when it snows alot.. During the summers the car is parked in the driveway and the rolling bench is in the middle..

I will tinker with Pherdies concept of storage in the back and tools up front..

true temper
02-12-2010, 09:27 PM
Build a dog house out back and put the compressor in it:D

whitis
02-12-2010, 09:30 PM
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/garage1.png

The dog represents my small car..

The doors are in the right spot. All parts are correct size maybe except for an inch here or there.. Yes, my compressor is that big...

Any suggestions on making it better???

Oh, width of garage is wrong, but I am not concerned about it...and I may mount the grinder to a smaller platform, maybe on the rolling bench.

I think the kennedy tool box may get in the way/take off your elbows when running the lathe and will get in the way of using the bandsaw. At least it probably has wheels but do you want to have to move it each time? I would rather have it out of the way but nearby and roll it closer for convenience if needed.

If you put the bandsaw and the drill press together, they may be able to share clearance for long stock. If space is at a premium and you are only using one tool at a time, you can mount your throat tools (vertical bandsaw, drill press, chop saw, horizontal band saw, arbor press, etc) side by side with the tables adjusted to the same height so they provide clearance for each other and can share clearance left and right. You can have workbenches left and right if the table height is above the clutter height on the workbenches.

Try this: slight the rolling bench down to where the shelves are and the band saw with it. Put the drill press next to the band saw. Move the kennedy where the drill press was. Possibly put the lathe against the wall and shelves where the lathe was. Adjust table height on drill press and band saw above lathe carriage height, if you can. Make sure the compressor doesn't get in the way of feeding work through the lathe spindle, if you do that. Lathe against the wall does potentially limit the total clearance on each side of the throat tools.

Ideally, you would have windows or doors aligned so you have an infinite span on either side of the throat tools. I would even consider cut a hole in the side of shelves if I had to put them in the way and adding strategically placed windows or trap doors in walls so work could pass through. Consider: Here is a 12' 2x4; drill holes on 12" centers along the entire length and band saw a notch in each end.

Alternatively, you can mount the throat tools near the door on casters so you can slide them forward and have the full length of the garage on one side and the full length of outside on the other. Having everything on wheels means you can reconfigure to the needs of the job.

Really depends on the specific 3D geometry of your tools and what you work on. There are tradeoffs you have to weigh for yourself.

Or you can just abandon the illusion that you will every be able to park your car inside :)

portlandRon
02-12-2010, 09:44 PM
Place the lathe so that you are looking out into the garage rather then at a wall. Then you can but stuff against the back side. I have had my lathe that way for years and it's a lot nicer to be able to look up and not just see a wall. Also stops anyone from coming up behind you when you are running it.

Roy Andrews
02-12-2010, 10:30 PM
you don't say what is on the walls so i will say to put the tool box where the shelve is at the front door and cut that shelve in half and put half above the compressor and half above the lathe. i put up a bunch of shelving and cabinets above all my benches and short tools and cleared up a lot of floor.

cuemaker
02-12-2010, 10:57 PM
Ok, I do have one hanging set of shelves..but moveable...

I was thinking of a shelf above the compressor..not sure yet...

Here are more layouts..I like each..no one stands out...

In the last 2, where the lathe is against the walls, there is a window...

Also, the bandsaw is very movable. It cuts metal, but its not a big one. The DP is not very movable.. The little shelf in the drawing is used for chemical and the what not..the big shelf holds all my extra junk... any extra wall space will be taken up with a table/bench to store more junk..

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/1.png
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/2.png
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/3.png

Too_Many_Tools
02-12-2010, 11:59 PM
If You can move the compressor outside to a shed or lean-to it will free up space and eliminate noise and the need to clean chips off of and from under it.

Steve

You might want to rethink that.

Compressors outside grow legs and walk away.

Jim Shaper
02-13-2010, 01:36 AM
Am I the only one taking issue with the location of the drill press?

If you can't easily move it, you should really have more space around it for longer parts.


Also, those of you who propose putting the air compressor outside - do you live in cold climates?

I can't think of a better way to rust out a pump than exposing it to the constant condensation cycles having it in an unheated external enclosure would cause.

Not necessarily in the dead of winter (when you have the abuse of cold oil to deal with), but rather in spring and fall when night time temps are below the daytime dew point and daytime highs aren't high enough to evaporate it quickly. As the sun heats the air around the doghouse, the pump, tank, and motor stay cold and get condensation on and in them.

It'd be nice to free up the space, but I don't see how it could be good for the machine.

RichardG
02-13-2010, 01:50 AM
Hi,
If the compressor is the lay down type build a house around it and make the top a workbench /tool storeage it will cut down the noise and give you more room.
Richard

SpyGuy
02-13-2010, 05:10 AM
If the compressor is the lay down type build a house around it and make the top a workbench /tool storeage it will cut down the noise and give you more room.

Realize that you risk burning up your compressor like that. Unless you are going to provide carefully-planned** forced air ventilation for the enclosure.

** By carefully-planned, I mean that your enclosure fans will work with (and not against) the fan and air flow built into the design of the compressor.

John Stevenson
02-13-2010, 05:48 AM
My compressors are up in the roof, it's not like I need acces to them all the while, just the odd service.

You might look to getting a smaller dog, that one must cost a fortune to feed.

BWS
02-13-2010, 06:54 AM
Just a little rambling.........early in design stage you should really figure out which way the wind blows.IOWs do a quick study with a cpl bx fans,or whatever.You're looking for the airs natural tendancies.......do it doors open/closed.Think about building a portable,rm air cleaner.It can also dbl as a port. meduium project spraybooth.General breeze direction can/will influence where stuff goes.Taking it one step further be thinking dust collection systems.....no,you might not need one now....planning one makes sense nevertheless.

Now start looking at safety........pile of chips goes up in flames(your machining some exotic metal for dog).Is this gonna cause a complete panic?It dosn't have to,plan on it.Start thinking OSHA...I know,they suck and will always suck...but that dosn't mean we can't learn from them.Why NOT be complient?

Noise polution can come in many forms.Our compressor is inside.Sure wish I'd done the work needed to have it somewhere else...........around here at least,new subdivision homes have replaced "class A" fireplaces with gas FP's.They build these shed roof appendeges on the side of house.Little gas vent and voila,I get to charge you for FP and "get away with" cheaping out on chimney.Anyhow,look around and see if you can spot some of these in your area.That is what I'd build as an add-on for compressor,its outside AND inside.Insulate with noise as well as air in mind and vent accordingly.

Theres also outside storage.......it dosen't need to upset the community.That BB chevy thats waiting to be picked up,55 G drums of chips,new material delivery,ect.ect.Start looking for ways to develop outside storage,as small as that may be.Think of those little trashcan enclosures made with little cute "pickets".Now man that idea up to produce a much nicer,WAY more professional look.Its a proactive position to curb(sorry)any pesky neighbor BS before it even gets started.Heck,a line of bushes looks better than a scrap pile.....screw the neighbors,I don't want to look at the scrap.

Good luck,BW

spkrman15
02-13-2010, 03:27 PM
Cue,

Here is my input.

1. Keep the doors clear. In a couple of your set-ups the drill press is close to the door. Leave room around the doors. It is nice to not trip over stuff as you walk in.

2. Leave room for your drill press. You will be surprised at how often a part you are trying to machine or drill will interfere with another machine

3. Keep your compressor inside. I know, noise, etc. but is your compressor running all the time? It really is not worth the trade off. Condensation is a compressor and air lines worse nightmare.

4. Plugs on the wall. Put in a fair amount of plugs. This will let you move machines around as you get more of them :) .... OR as you re-arrange

Rob :)

doctor demo
02-13-2010, 03:56 PM
Also, those of you who propose putting the air compressor outside - do you live in cold climates?
It'd be nice to free up the space, but I don't see how it could be good for the machine.
I didn't look at the location, many don't include it so I stopped looking.
Lots of outdoor compressors around here, in cages or sheds or back yards.

Steve

cuemaker
02-13-2010, 06:01 PM
After reading through all the responses, I really like what portlandjohn said about being able to look out into the garage.. I have have small kids and I realized being able to see the whole garage was kinda of a big deal. So I am going with something like this..

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/4.png

Compressor isnt going outside...Its actually quiet, just a huge footprint because its a horizontal 60 gallon and I have it on a frame with casters that have inflatable rubber wheels.

Drill press is also small, just dont want to move it much, but its not a big deal if I have to. I havent needed much room with it yet.

Band saw is very light, very easily moved if needed..

Here is a link to an album with most of the pieces..

http://s201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/Garage%20stuff%20for%20layout/

Here is a picture of the corner already done showing the compressor, DP, rolling bench and bandsaw in place..

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/Garage%20stuff%20for%20layout/DSCN2315.jpg

Jim Shaper
02-13-2010, 07:29 PM
I don't see a drain on your compressor tank. You do have one, right?

Carld
02-13-2010, 10:09 PM
Cue, I like your last layout better than the others but the drill press does not have enough room around it. I don't know what the thing marked SAELC behind the Kennedy box is but the drill press would be better in that area.

cuemaker
02-13-2010, 10:28 PM
Cue, I like your last layout better than the others but the drill press does not have enough room around it. I don't know what the thing marked SAELC behind the Kennedy box is but the drill press would be better in that area.

Carl, its a big ass shelf... still playing with it

Jim, yes, there is a drain.. but the old style with a dip tube..

Paul Alciatore
02-14-2010, 02:40 AM
Suggestions for improvement? Add a mill. And a surface grinder. And a welder. And a shaper. And ...

Well, you get the idea.

rockrat
02-14-2010, 09:13 AM
Cue, you have a set of stairs there. If they are going up, why not put the air compressor under them? In fact, use that space for all of the stuff that does not need to be out and in the way.

I like a lathe out away from the wall as you have yours in the last posting. With it square to the window though, you may cast a shadow when you stand there. Add a light above for sure so that you have good illumination for operating the equipment.

I have put outlets in my ceiling and I do not regret doing so. I have used them so much that I may add more.

Good luck!
rock~

Carld
02-14-2010, 10:34 AM
Carl, its a big ass shelf... still playing with it

ROFLMAO :D well, if it's a big ass shelf put it to use and put the drill press between it and the side door to store drill press stuff on. Oh, and make it several shelves as you'll need lots of storage space for all the knic-nacks in a machine shop.

Jim Shaper
02-14-2010, 10:54 AM
I have put outlets in my ceiling and I do not regret doing so. I have used them so much that I may add more.

Good luck!
rock~

I'd have outlets in my ceiling, but I have a bridge crane. :D

If you don't have something that would cause problems with outlet drops (like I do), there's really no reason not to have them throughout the ceiling. Sure beats stomping chips into your extension cords.


As for the lathe out in the room - I'm not a fan. I like having mine as close to the wall as possible. I've tried it at a 90 to the wall, and that wasn't bad, but my lathe is 9'6" long and that cuts into the flow of my 23' wide shop.

cuemaker
02-14-2010, 11:46 AM
I asked for some design help, but she wasnt interested on Friday or Saturday.. but Sunday morning she was...

She changed everything and came up with this brilliant layout. I really thought i wouldnt be able to make use of that low bench on the back wall, but it fits perfectly where it is.

She was kind enough to let me move my big shelf to her side of the garage provided I make some kind of bench for her... I had been saving an old kitchen table that I had stolen 2 legs from 2yrs ago... now its fits just right, dog food under it, a table top to put the bowels on while filling them..

I am very excited...

yes Carld, there isnt as much room for the DP as we would like, but the bench and compressor on either side are on wheels so I can make more, or just move it out into the room some....

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/Garage%20stuff%20for%20layout/DSCN2317.jpg
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/Garage%20stuff%20for%20layout/DSCN2318.jpg
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/Garage%20stuff%20for%20layout/DSCN2319.jpg
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/Garage%20stuff%20for%20layout/DSCN2320.jpg

Weston Bye
02-14-2010, 12:12 PM
Good work, Cuemakers Wife!

Now was it me...
I'd swap the compressor and the bandsaw.

Then, I would replumb the compressor to move that kneeknocker of a regulator around the corner of the tank.

Then, I would build a flat roof over the compressor, attached to that neat frame on the casters. (excellent idea, the casters) The roof on the compressor would serve as additional Flat Surface. All shops need more Flat Surface.:D Also, the framework for the Flat Surface would provide structure to mount a hose rack. Don't just flop the coil of air hose on the Flat Surface.

Some years ago Neil Knopf, then editor of HSM, introduced the concept in an editorial of the First Available Flat Surface; The place where you need to set something down upon entering the shop. Seems a scarce thing and an ongoing struggle.

vpt
02-14-2010, 12:25 PM
I agree, a flat surface over the compressor would be very handy!

KiddZimaHater
02-14-2010, 12:38 PM
WOW !!!
Look at all of that free space.
I had to cram my machines into a 1-car garage.
Nice and cozy. Just don't turn around fast, or you'll whack your elbow on something.:D
http://img687.imageshack.us/img687/4993/shoplayout.jpg

Jim Shaper
02-14-2010, 02:30 PM
Washer/dryer??? LOL

The stuff coming out of the laundry would be dirtier than what went in it in my shop. :p

KiddZimaHater
02-14-2010, 03:56 PM
The clothes are fine.
It's the metal chips in my wife's barefeet that annoy her.:D

Jim Shaper
02-14-2010, 04:09 PM
A week ago my kid's teacher calls up all distraught because kiddo (who's in 2nd grade) had a metal sliver in his foot and she was baffled as to where it came from. :D Usually it's the wife's feet that pick them up.