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uncle_moko
03-06-2010, 11:03 AM
I've been attempting to find suitable wheels to put on the FRONT of my Bushhog Screamer. They MUST be on a swivel.
Any suggestions???

vpt
03-06-2010, 11:23 AM
How big of wheels are you looking for? I would think bigger caster wheels would be what you are looking for.

http://www.chdist.com/images/products/71-914NU_P.jpg

tryfred
03-06-2010, 12:20 PM
I brought a discarded power wheelchair home one time…I saved the swivel (bullet proof) wheels, the dc motors/gear boxes and controllers and scrapped the rest…never have used any of it…where in the world are you…I could have a deal…
Joe

uncle_moko
03-10-2010, 08:07 PM
I purchased a few casters to try out. my #1 concern is weight bearing. If the wheels are too big the cut height will be determined by the front wheels and not the hydraulic lift position... I'm going to give it a try this weekend.
My main purpose is to keep the front tracks from gouging the ground when I'm cutting - I'm not on the levelist land in the world ...

Hey I do want to thank you guys for the replies.

Uncle_Moko

CCWKen
03-10-2010, 08:21 PM
Your 3PH isn't working? :D
I take it this is to avoid scalping or digging? You could just raise the front or lower the rear. That's what that lever is to the right of your seat. ;) Sounds like your top link isn't adjusted.

I've seen some cutters with the wheels that VPT posted mounted in front of the cutter like the finish mowers. I wouldn't mount them on the sides as it would interfere with close cutting next to fences and buildings. If you're going to use this type of setup, be sure to use a floating top connection or you could bend/break something.

CCWKen
03-10-2010, 08:25 PM
Well, you type really fast or I type really slow.
Mount the fronts like most of the rears. They should be adjustable.

wooleybooger
03-10-2010, 10:10 PM
how big is your tractor and mower? a properly set mower should be adjusted to be slightly lower in front than rear when set to your desired cutting height. a lot of the small tractors have 2 positions where the Lift arm connects to the Pulling arm. a single hole "solid" and a slotted "float" position. caster wheels mounted to the front will probably bend or break due to the short turning radius. eyeball your ground and mow with ditches and waterways,not across.small mounds and hills,start at the bottom and mow round and round.

bruto
03-10-2010, 10:22 PM
I'm with woolybooger. I think you'll have trouble finding any compact caster that will stand up long to the kind of abuse a bush hog takes, and anything small enough to fit conveniently at the front will probably dig in worse than the skids that are usually built in. If I were you, I'd look at broadening and lengthening the skids instead.

I have seen mowers meant to be pulled with a plain drawbar rather than a lift, and they had casters on the front (needed since there is no lift to determine height), but they were designed from the start for this. Some landscaping rakes also have front casters. Maybe you could check for those.

Bill736
03-10-2010, 11:13 PM
I think the front mounted caster wheels should work fine to help prevent digging trenches with the skids. I'd use large ones with air filled tires, as shown by a previous poster. Buy them at a local supply like Tractor Supply, so that if you need replacements they will be available, and easy bolt-ons. Mower deck duty is tough on bearings, and bush hog blades do throw things out with a lot of force. You could even use three or four casters. And yes, be sure your top link is attached by a double jointed floating yoke so that the rear of the mower deck can kick up easily as necessary.

Black Forest
03-11-2010, 04:03 AM
I googled Bushhog Screamer and only got this site as a result.

What type of mowing are you doing? Rough pasture type or semi finish mowing. That will make a difference on what type of wheel you use.

Most bushhog type mowers have a solid wheel for a rear castor. The swivel is a shaft in a pipe/bushing with spacers used above and below the bushing to get the desired cutting height.

Are you just trying to avoid scalping or using the castors for cutting height?

camdigger
03-11-2010, 02:56 PM
How big is a bush hog screamer? Are you trying to convert it to a finishing mower? http://www.everythingattachments.com/tractor-finishing-mower-s/242.htm
If you were in grain country, I'd suggest a farm equipment boneyard. Many combine pickups have solid rubber casters to keep the pick up teeth the correct height off the ground. http://www.shelbourne.com/3/products/1/harvesting/57_pick-up-header/58_technical-data

Combine pickups also use a different lift too. They often use a chain to the outboard edge. Slack in the chain means the gage wheels are doing their job, tight chain - the table should be lowered, too much slack - the table should be raised.

I've seen some finishing mower decks using the same principle. The 3 pt arms float and the back is lifted by a chain to the front of the mower. That way the deck hugs the ground better, and doesn't scalp as bad.
http://www.ssbtractor.com/page1.html

jimmyg
03-11-2010, 03:57 PM
I can't figure out the goal. Is it to convert a brush mower to a 'grooming' mower or to keep the mower body from digging up the grass? In the former case I think the results will be disappointing. The 'grooming' mowers I've seen have a floating deck and anti-scalp rollers. In the later case I'd just control the mower height via the lift arm control. Instead of adding tires to the front perhaps adding a lift capability to the back would be more helpful and use that along w/ the lift arm control? My mower has statically adjusted back wheels which are set worst case. The front is adjusted by the lift arm control....

uncle_moko
03-14-2010, 11:19 AM
I have a 9000 year old Kubota L285 (~30 hp).

I'm curious as what was meant by top link adjustment. There is a lot of play in the slotted unit on the bushhog that connects to the top link. Give me a hint - the hydraulics are OK - meaning they don't leak so much - but they do leak - it is afterall a 9000 year old machine. :rolleyes:

I'm skeptical about the casters as well - but I need to do something.

Another note - I found that mowing backwards is the most effective and clean way. Of course that may be a manifestation of my waiting until the grass is 2 feet tall... But what the heck that's why I bought the SCREAMER!

Thanks for the help guys!!!

uncle_moko
03-14-2010, 11:22 AM
I can't figure out the goal. Is it to convert a brush mower to a 'grooming' mower or to keep the mower body from digging up the grass? In the former case I think the results will be disappointing. The 'grooming' mowers I've seen have a floating deck and anti-scalp rollers. In the later case I'd just control the mower height via the lift arm control. Instead of adding tires to the front perhaps adding a lift capability to the back would be more helpful and use that along w/ the lift arm control? My mower has statically adjusted back wheels which are set worst case. The front is adjusted by the lift arm control....


Jimmyg - No I'm not trying to convert the bushhog to a groomer --- just keep the skids from digging. I have a VERY uneven parcel of land -- maybe moguls is appropriate. I'm constantly adjusting the lift arm as my poor old tractor hydraulics leak a little - so I'm looking for a solution where I just drop the mower and forget about it.
Any ideas?

bruto
03-14-2010, 10:42 PM
Jimmyg - No I'm not trying to convert the bushhog to a groomer --- just keep the skids from digging. I have a VERY uneven parcel of land -- maybe moguls is appropriate. I'm constantly adjusting the lift arm as my poor old tractor hydraulics leak a little - so I'm looking for a solution where I just drop the mower and forget about it.
Any ideas?Been there with my old Ford whose hydraulics were pretty thoroughly tuckered and did not respond quickly enough to make on the fly adjustments. I think better skids would probably work better than wheels, unless you can make the wheels pretty large. The very terrain problem that makes this an issue is going to bend the wheels unless they're big enough to ride over holes and ruts.

I ended up getting a better tractor, but was about to consider finding a couple of snowmobile skis or something like that to replace the inadequate skids on my Bush Hog Squealer. As it is, I just welded some little bits on, because the tractor now behaves, and the mower is so badly beat up after 20+ years that I think it's soon going to need a major reworking anyway (holes worn through, big cracks, missing chunks, etc). The skis may yet appear in a future incarnation.

Some tractors have an option for implement float. Instead of a plain hole, the bottom of the lift links has a slot, so that the lower arms ride up and down freely for a couple of inches. Of course the weight of the implement keeps it down in general use, but if you hit an obstacle, it lifts only the lower arm instead of the whole shebang. On my Deere you can select this by pulling a pin and turning it. I don't know how you might add something like that to a tractor that doesn't have it, but it probably would be possible.

Mowing backwards works very nicely, but you'll have to watch out for bending the back caster, because it will be taking the brunt of the abuse, and the pivot pin is tilted for normal forward operation. I've bent, twisted, broken and otherwise mangled mine a number of times backing into brush and obstacles, and had to replace the fork once. Backward operation also puts a lot of sideways stresses on your hitch.

wooleybooger
03-14-2010, 11:45 PM
the toplink is the third arm of the 3-point lift. the 2 bottom ones are the lift arms, the one in the top-center is a big turnbuckle with RH and LH threads. that is your toplink. you should have adjustments on your lift arms to level the tool horizontally from side to side. the toplink will level the tool horizontally from front to back. this is more important with digging tools.

jimmyg
03-15-2010, 01:18 PM
Jimmyg - No I'm not trying to convert the bushhog to a groomer --- just keep the skids from digging. I have a VERY uneven parcel of land -- maybe moguls is appropriate. I'm constantly adjusting the lift arm as my poor old tractor hydraulics leak a little - so I'm looking for a solution where I just drop the mower and forget about it.
Any ideas?

I see, perhaps the problem should be attacked from a different POV. Instead of wheels for the mower a box blade could be used to correct the 'moguls'? :D Once flattened it will be easier/faster to traverse (easier on you and the equipment).

The top link on my mower is designed to allow limited up/down movement but by no means would it 'flatten' wavy terrain. I think its primarily meant to 'gracefully' handle more relaxed geography, backing into hills/over banks etc. The word tho is gradual. At any rate even w/ chains youre only going to get as much latitude as the chain allows. There are some (not me) who are of the 'top links need not apply' school of brush mowing. I always figured if the top link was unnecessary it wouldnt be there. :)