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vpt
03-06-2010, 01:48 PM
Someone on another forum was talking about smoking and tar getting on machines.

I have been smoking for 16 years and just quit a month ago. I have had a couple cigarettes here and there from friends. This is my third try at quitting, first time lasted for 2 months, 2nd time for 6 months. I am going to make this time work. It has just gotten to expensive and everyone tells me it is unhealthy.

So how long have you been smoking? How long has it been since you quit? Any helpful ideas for helping the quit process?

rmancini
03-06-2010, 02:00 PM
Funny that you should mention .............
I'm on day 52 of "the patch". I guess they help but I sure want to light-up now and then.
I guess that like anything else, some days are really difficult but then others really suck! It's pretty much an on-going battle for me.
I smoked 2+ packs a day for 46 years so I really didn't expect it to be a breeze.
I do intend to hang in there. Try the patches you can get them at COSTCO for a reasonable price. (While you're there, get a drum of ketchup!!)
Lache pas la patate.
Rich

Dr Stan
03-06-2010, 02:11 PM
Well I'm 55 and quit 15 years ago. I started smoking as a teen and really got going while I was in the Navy when a pack was only 13 cents when we were out to sea, or overseas.

I quit with the help of the patch and found it to be very helpful allowing me to step down as when I quit I was smoking a pack to a pack and a quarter a day. Although at one point I was up to 3 packs a day of Paul Maul reds (king size non-filtered).

Here is one thing I'm sure of. If I were to start again I would be right back to where I was when I quit. I'd love to have a cigar on a special occasion (New Years, birthday, etc) but I know damn good and well I'd get hooked all over again. So, I've had to use my will power to stay away from tobacco. I still drink coffee like a fiend and have the occasional beer, or wine, or Wild Turkey, but can do so without the smokes.

I also swore to myself that I would not become one of those nasty ex-smokers waving my finger in the face of smokers. I believe I've done a good job of that as most who now know me would never pick me out as a former smoker.

Good luck.

Allan Waterfall
03-06-2010, 02:14 PM
I stopped nearly four weeks ago,I got lozenges to help but tend to burn my lips lighting them.

Allan

toolmaker76
03-06-2010, 02:15 PM
I can tell you from experience that it is easy to quit smoking- I must have done it a thousand times! (Mark Twain quote)

I smoked 3-4 packs a day for over 25 years- they started talking about pack years- a pack a day for a year- and I realized I had a pack century to deal with! So I thought it was time to quit, set a date for my 40th birthday, and then white knuckled it. It was tough for awhile, but that has been over 12 years ago now. It gets easier the longer you go without.

You have to deal with some strong cravings from time to time. Take some deep breaths when that happens- I always thought a nicotene fit felt similar to being short of air anyway. Its tough, but you have probably been through the worst cravings!

One of the things that I find is even after all this time, if I sit down to look at a print, I will still automatically reach into my shirt pocket for a cigarette! No craving there, just habit!

Dr Stan
03-06-2010, 02:19 PM
One of the things that I find is even after all this time, if I sit down to look at a print, I will still automatically reach into my shirt pocket for a cigarette! No craving there, just habit!

This is what makes it so hard to quit. Smoking is a combination of a physiological addiction and a psychological mannerism (habit).

The patch and other nicotine substitutes will help, but one still needs the will power to break the habit portion of smoking.

toolmaker76
03-06-2010, 02:21 PM
My wife still smokes, but in the house she only smokes while she is sitting on the couch. We have a cat that is 18 years old, that for the first several years was not too concerned with being around people.

Here lately, though, Kitty hangs around my wife like grim death. If my wife is on the couch, Kitty has to be there to the point of being annoying. It finally occurred to us that Kitty is hooked on secondhand smoke!

Ghop Shop
03-06-2010, 02:40 PM
If you can stop smoking you can do a lot of other good things!

Chester
03-06-2010, 03:40 PM
My last cigarette, after many tries at quitting, was new year's eve 1972. And have never looked back. Wife still smokes, but it really does not bother me. Ocassionally, that second hand smoke really smells good, especially if you are having a beer or two (with smokers), but will not be tempted again......ever.

airsmith282
03-06-2010, 03:50 PM
my last smoke was 10 min ago and just lite another one ,, not bad 10 min apart,,

mochinist
03-06-2010, 04:13 PM
quit cold turkey a little over a year ago after retaking up the habit of smoking for about two years, before that I had quit for about 4 or 5 years before but still had occasional cigars. This time is for good though, zero nicotine for me ever again. I would say the only downfall of quitting is the weight gain, seemed like it almost instantly made me gain about 15lbs that doesnt seem to want to come off.

rkepler
03-06-2010, 04:45 PM
I quit more than 20 years ago when the airlines were going non-smoking. I was smoking (or, more properly, igniting) something like 3 packs a day and the thought of 'quitting' for several hours at a time several days a week was unpleasant, better to get it over with all at once. I used the nicotine gum to help me get over the withdrawal symptoms.

The dreams stopped within a couple of years, but there's still a few places that I drive where I really feel the desire to pull to the side of the road and have a cigarette while looking at the view.

EdC
03-06-2010, 04:48 PM
I started smoking in Highschool and did that for 10 years then I quit in August 94 and never looked back...OK I had a cigar on New Years eve 94 but nothing since. I went to sunflower seeds for a while when ever I had an urge to light up but that only lasted a few months. Now I don't even think about it.

websterz
03-06-2010, 04:50 PM
I smoked 2+ packs a day, Marlboro Red 100's, aka "Cowboy Killers" for 20 years. After leaving work early one night with a bad case of bronchitis I was sitting in the car and reflexively lit up a smoke. I said "What the #$%^ am I doing?!", went straight home, and my daughter and I sat together and crumbled up 5 or 6 packs and trashed them. That was 6 years ago the 30th of this month. Within a week I couldn't tolerate secondhand smoke. My throat closes up and I cannot breathe around it. I am done for good.

websterz
03-06-2010, 04:52 PM
...The dreams stopped within a couple of years, ...

I still have dreams where I am smoking and I am always pissed at myself when I wake up. :mad:

Uncle O
03-06-2010, 05:10 PM
I quit Jan. 29 2009 after 35+ years of smoking.
I took those Chantix pills for 1 month. Quit smoking and quit the pills at the end of the month .

petermac
03-06-2010, 05:23 PM
I am now 72 Just got out of hosp Dam Dideties .
Quit Smoking About 35 years ago I ran out went to bum 1 till I got 2 a store.
The guy gave me a hard time I said I Quite Havent had 1 sinse

HSS
03-06-2010, 06:23 PM
Good luck, you can do it. I'm 60 and I started smoking in high school. I smoked until my dad's smoking killed him. I quit the day he died and haven't had one since. I did chew for a while and where I worked there was nowhere to spit so I just swallowed it. Quit chewing tobacco when I had to have a root canal in 94 and haven't had any tobacco at all since then either. For quite some time after I quit the chewing tobacco, anytime I was working outside mowing or burning brush I wanted a chew so bad, but that too shall pass. Now I don't crave them at all. Just hang there and you can beat it.

Good luck
Patrick

Black_Moons
03-06-2010, 06:50 PM
I quit april first.. a few years ago.. as an april fools joke on myself!
Sure fooled that body! hahah... *twitch*
Used the patch that I got free from the canadian goverment under some project they where trying at the time.. Only made it through 2 boxes of the heavy patch (about 2 weeks?) before going off the patch as well...
IMO the patch was GREAT. let me seperate my mental cravings from my physical cravings and deal with them at seperate times.
And honestly, the mental cravings where worse then the physical ones.
But without the physical cravings, I could at least distract myself into doing something else insted of constantly tihnking about it.

No longer crave cigs or even want one a few years later... And get disguested at other smokers smoking in my house.

However, rest assured smokers, I don't care about you smoking outside around doors and windows and in parks, thats just nazi stuff trying to stop that.

I would however like to see smoking made illegal if they are really gonna consider it so 'bad' for you (and everyone around you) that you can't even do it outside!
Make up your mind goverment, don't pass retarded half assed laws. Its either illegal everywhere or illegal nowhere. every building owner can decide apon smoking indoors or not on thier own, very simple, you either say no, or say yes. Doesnt take goverment laws to figure that out.

Your Old Dog
03-06-2010, 07:10 PM
When I was in the 7th grade I left the playground everyday to go up the block and have a cigarette. It was 37 years later that I quit for the last time. I got some empowerment from two things as it turned out. One was a doctor who told me it was perfectly alright to try and quit and fail, but it was not ok to quit trying. And another empowerment was my telling people like yourselves who quit and then started again that if I could go 7 days without a smoke I'd never look back. Well after ab out 5 attempts at quitting I finally made it 7 days without a smoke by using the patch for I think the 3d time. After the 7th day, it's like I never smoked. I never once reached for my cigarettes, never dreamt of them. When I quit I was 3 packs a day and the convienance store girls were saving coupons for me as a regular customer.

It helps a lot when you give yourself a chance at it. Instead of telling yourself you can't do it try and tell yourself it is possible. And then don't expect everyone you come in contact with to quit smoking also. You are quitting, not your wife, you kids or the neighbors.

Tell yourself if you make it 7 days you'll never look back. That way you have some closure. Life sure is better on the other side.

I'm 63 now. I wouldn't take $10,000 to take a tote now. That's one monkey I don't ever need to see again.

So, are you quitting or trying to quit? Think about your answer when folks ask you.

darryl
03-06-2010, 07:46 PM
My (ex) roomate started smoking at 18. She's nearly 21 now. So sad seeing someone more or less just starting to smoke- However she's started taking Champex, or something like that. I hope it works for her.

My dad quit cold turkey when he was sort of shown that he could be dead before his children no longer needed him. It was an act of willpower- he kept a half pack in his pocket for two weeks without touching them, then tossed them out. That was it, he never smoked again.

Which is the boss in your life- your cravings or your resolve- one is manipulating you, and the other is you taking control and making your life better. The latter is an admirable trait and looks good on you.

tyrone shewlaces
03-06-2010, 08:15 PM
I quit about this time last year, then picked it up around the holidays for about a month, then quit again first week of January. I smoked for over 25 years.
The first time (last year) quitting seemed easy. I got over it pretty quick and felt physically better immediately. After a week or two the cravings really start to drop off. After about a month I figured I wouldn't have to worry about it again. After starting it up again, it was quite a bit tougher to quit the second time for whatever reason.

The thing about quitting is it's a little like a toxic relationship. After a while away from it you forget how bad you felt being in the middle of it. Hindsight is NOT 20/20. You tend to forget how strongly you wanted to quit and feel like it's not a big deal to be a smoker again. I'll tell you, at least for me - I feel terrible while I'm smoking. I feel sick and tired all the time. It's the poison coursing through your system. When I'm not smoking I feel tons better, both physically and mentally. Being a smoker is just such a stupid thing. Now that I'm away from it, I simply can't stand the smell of cigarette smoke. It makes me sick now like it did when I was a kid.

The good thing is, as hard as it was to quit this second time, it feels to have "sticked" stronger. I really don't want to live tied to those damn things ever again.

I will suggest you do some research. Anything you can learn about quitting is likely to help a lot. Knowledge is definitely power regarding kicking this habit. It also helps to have a support group. Talk to your family about how they feel about you being a non-smoker as well as maybe other ex-smokers if you know any. You need to be periodically reminded about the bad parts of it from time to time. All this kind of stuff can be most helpful.

Good luck. Enjoy life.

vpt
03-06-2010, 08:16 PM
Anyone try substituting something like hard candy or gum for smoking? There are just those times like late in the day when you pull the nob for the 5 minute wait of the power cross feed for the 20 time that you would normally light up and you just have an urge to do something.

gary350
03-06-2010, 08:39 PM
Someone on another forum was talking about smoking and tar getting on machines.

I have been smoking for 16 years and just quit a month ago. I have had a couple cigarettes here and there from friends. This is my third try at quitting, first time lasted for 2 months, 2nd time for 6 months. I am going to make this time work. It has just gotten to expensive and everyone tells me it is unhealthy.

So how long have you been smoking? How long has it been since you quit? Any helpful ideas for helping the quit process?


If your just going to try to quit, then your not going to quit. You have to make up your mind and QUIT. You have to say, that was the very last one, no more!!!!!!!!!!!!! When you can do that then you will quit.

Your Old Dog
03-06-2010, 08:42 PM
........................After starting it up again, it was quite a bit tougher to quit the second time for whatever reason.
.................................


So where were you when you thought you could have just one? In a car on along ride with a friend or at a tavern having a few drinks. Many have told me thats whre they got started again, I believed them and was able to resist for that reason...

xeddog
03-06-2010, 08:50 PM
I started smoking when I was in high school, or maybe the last year or two of junior high (high school was grades 10-12 and junior high was 7-9) so maybe around 1952ish. My dad owned a business supplying juke boxes, pinball machines and cigarette machines for different places, and a lot of the time we had to remove old cigarettes from machines and replace them with fresh. I started smoking the stale cigarettes.

I was working grave shift and one morning when I got off work, I stopped at a local 7/11 and bought a new pack of Marlboros. Went home and slept most of the day but then got up and ate, etc. When I started to go to work I had only 2 cigarettes left in that pack I bought that morning. It scared me that I was smoking so much. I looked at that pack for a moment, then smashed up the last two cigarettes and threw them away. That was November 2, 1981.

Since then I have not had a smoke of any kind. Going on 30 years later I can honestly say that it was one of the best decisions I have ever made. It's like others have said, there is the chemical dependence of the addiction, and there is the "habit". Many times I would reach into my shirt pocket to get a smoke without even realizing what I was doing.

With alcohol, they say "once an alcoholic, always an alcoholic", but that is not so with tabacky. I am over it. Completely. I will never smoke again. I have passed all of those habitual movements to get a smoke. I have passed all of those fleeting thoughts of "a cigarette would sure be good now". I have made it to the point that cigarette smoke is quite offensive. IT STINKS!!!

But I also have to admit that I had it fairly easy when I was quitting. No one else in my family ever smoked. My mom and dad, brother, wife, and very few of our friends smoked. So I was rarely in the situations that tempted me.

Another thing that helped me too, is that my life had a couple of drastic changes. Within a few days of November 2, 1981, I stopped working grave shift and took a day job. My new cubicle mate was an avid non-smoker and he would let me have it good if I came to work stinking like cigarettes.
And that day job was a totally new direction for me too. So all of the habits that I had, whether smoking or not, changed too.

Even with all that, it is not easy to quit. But if you are successful, you will not regret it. It will be tough at first, then over time it will get easier, or maybe I should say less hard, and then it will be easier. Eventually, maybe after 10 or 15 years, you will probably be able to say that you are truly a EX-smoker.

I think it all depends on just how badly you wish to quit. If you just want to quit, you probably won't. If you REALLY want to, you probably will. At least you chances will be much better.

Best of luck. If you find a technique that helps you quit, stay with it. Unless it's illegal or dangerous. ;)

Wayne

saltmine
03-06-2010, 09:17 PM
I quit, cold turkey, in 1979.

I used to be an avid motorcyclist. Street bikes, motocross, and trail riding.

My brother had entered a race, and couldn't go (the wife said no), so, he asked me if I would run the race in his place. Like a fool, I said OK.

The race turned out to be a "Gran Prix" type race on an 8 mile course, and lasted 45 minutes, plus one lap. In other words it was a motocross race that lasted an hour.

Bear in mind, you can't sit down, or pull off the track to take a break, or have a cigarette...It's "balls-to-the-wall" for the duration.

I can handle this.

Well, to make a long story short, I finished third in my class. As I came off the track, I passed out. Oxygen debt. When I woke up, a paramedic had an oxygen mask on my face, and a needle in my arm. He explained that I'd gone into oxygen debt, plus I was dehydrated, badly. I recovered in about an hour. The scare of oxygen debt (almost like drowning, only worse) convinced me that I had to quit smoking, then and there. I haven't had a cigarette since. But, I did finish well enough to get invited to the finals at Anaheim Stadium, where I managed an eightth place finish.

Evan
03-06-2010, 09:23 PM
All you need to do to quit smoking is to stop doing it. I quit once for three months to find out if smoking was what was making me feel so crummy. It wasn't the smoking at all so I went back to smoking my pipe. Yes I inhale, and No, I don't want to quit. It is just a matter of making up your mind. There isn't any point in trying to bluff yourself since you already know what cards you are holding. I decided to quit drinking around 4 years ago to find out if that was also responsible for feeling so rotten all the time. It wasn't since it turns out I have fibromyalgia. But it saved money that I could spend on tools so I haven't had a drink since.

I don't like calling the mental effort required "willpower". It is more along the lines of keeping a promise. Breaking a promise to yourself is just plain dumb and is likely to make you think less of yourself. It is called low self esteem and that is one way to buy some. If you don't think you can follow through then don't try until you are sure you can.

jclem40c
03-06-2010, 09:43 PM
Quit smoking 32 years ago when SWMBO said it was either her or the Marlboros. She is much nicer and better for me than they were. Haven't looked back since and she is still here.

John

oldtiffie
03-06-2010, 09:43 PM
Odd co-incidence.

This came in today from a service to which I subscribe:



Today In Health History - Tobacco Comes To Spain

On this date in 1558, Spanish physician Francisco Fernandes introduced the smoking of tobacco in Spain. Fernandes first saw people smoking tobacco in Mexico, where King Philip II of Spain had sent him to discover what agricultural products the Mexicans were growing and using. In 1492, Christopher Columbus first saw tobacco in the New World when natives on San Salvador Island gave him gifts that included tobacco. Later, explorers Rodrigo de Jerez and Luis de Torres were reportedly the first to actually see tobacco smoking in action. They watched natives wrap dried tobacco plant leaves in either palm or maize, then light one end to "drink" the smoke through the other.

Arcane
03-06-2010, 09:44 PM
I've never smoked.............tobacco! :D

oldtiffie
03-06-2010, 10:15 PM
The OP title is: "OT Quit smoking! How long did you quit?"

Implicit in that question are others:
- "Why did you quit": and
- "What if you don't, or won't or can't?".

Given that it seems that addiction to tobacco/smoking is similar to being addicted to heroin and cocaine etc. - as "druggies/junkies" are - does it follow that smokers who can't or won't or don't give it up are addicts/druggies/junkies?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoking_cessation

http://www.cancer.org/docroot/ped/content/ped_10_13x_guide_for_quitting_smoking.asp

http://www.cancer.org/docroot/CRI/content/CRI_2_4_3X_What_are_the_signs_and_symptoms_of_canc er.asp

vpt
03-06-2010, 10:18 PM
Yup, their all closet crack heads!

J Harp
03-06-2010, 10:30 PM
I had my last cigarette in Nov. 1981. Had been smoking about 20 years, and was up to two or three packs a day. I had quit several times but always restarted.

When my wife had to go take care of her mother who was dieing of lung cancer, I decided that when she got home I would be a non smoker. Took about a week to cut down to 3 a day and then just quit. It was about a year before I stopped reaching to my shirt pocket for a smoke, that was just the habit. I believe in my case the physical habit was harder to break than the nicotine addiction.

vpt
03-06-2010, 10:33 PM
I believe in my case the physical habit was harder to break than the nicotine addiction.



Thats my problem.

outback
03-06-2010, 11:01 PM
I quit smoking because a close friend quit. I didn't think it would be right to smoke in front of him. Besides, I wanted to quit smoking and I used him for a reason. I quit cold turkey because I did not want to think about smoking and niccotine. When the urge to smoke came I got busy doing something constructive like washing windows, the car or cleaning up the shop. Sometimes I had to tell myself "I don't do that anymore". The urge will pass if you give it time and they will get further apart.

Here is how I got my wife to quit smoking. I told here I had not smoked in three days. I told her what it was like, what I was doing to get through the quit smoking process and why I quit. After a few minutes of silence, I said to my wife, "Just think, If you continue to smoke and you die early I'll get to spend your money and mine to". That did it, she quit smoking the next day. It has been 15 year since we smoked and she admits she quit because she couldn't stand the thought of me spending all our money without her around. Her reason to quit smoking was money.

We quit in April of 97. It was a long summer. Both of us were kind of snipy and bitchy at times. One day, I told my wife she may as well go back to smoking. With tears in her eyes, she said why? If the smoking does not kill you, I'M GOING TO. We laugh about it today.

Eight years after I quite smoking I went on a fishing trip to Canada. Took along some cigars, Ya know to keep the bugs away. I smoked them and hated them. Never smoked again.
Outback

Rustybolt
03-06-2010, 11:02 PM
So how long have you been smoking? How long has it been since you quit? Any helpful ideas for helping the quit process?


I smoked two packs a day since i was 18 til I was 29. I haven't had any since. I'm 58 now.

vpt
03-06-2010, 11:05 PM
Did you inhale with the cigars? I disliked cigars because some people say you don't inhale (than whats the point of smoking?) and inhaling cigars is crap by itself.

oldtiffie
03-06-2010, 11:38 PM
So how long have you been smoking? How long has it been since you quit? Any helpful ideas for helping the quit process?
I smoked two packs a day since i was 18 til I was 29. I haven't had any since. I'm 58 now.

That:
Any helpful ideas for helping the quit process?
rather suggests "Any helpful incentives for the quit process?".

Try this:

Causes
Tobacco smoking is the main known cause of urinary bladder cancer: in most populations, smoking causes over half of bladder cancer cases in men and a sizable proportion in women. There is a linear relationship between smoking and risk, and quitting smoking reduces the risk.[2] In a 10-year study involving almost 48,000 men, researchers found that men who drank 1.5L of water a day had a significantly reduced incidence of bladder cancer when compared with men who drank less than 240mL (around 1 cup) per day. The authors proposed that bladder cancer might partly be caused by the bladder directly contacting carcinogens that are excreted in urine. Thirty percent of bladder tumors probably result from occupational exposure in the workplace to carcinogens such as benzidine. 2-Naphthylamine, which is found in cigarette smoke, has also been shown to increase bladder cancer risk. Occupations at risk are metal industry workers, rubber industry workers, workers in the textile industry, and people who work in printing. Some studies also suggest that auto mechanics have an elevated risk of bladder cancer due to their frequent exposure to hydrocarbons and petroleum-based chemicals.[3] Hairdressers are thought to be at risk as well because of their frequent exposure to permanent hair dyes.

From:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bladder_cancer

Quite a mix of possible and probable causes in the shop and some of the causes and exposures that many here have had - and may still be exposed to - in the shop.

Now mix smoking in with that and it becomes quite a risk and a worry.

Want another?

Have you considered the effects on your family both while smoking and during any smoke-caused effects and illnesses?

Another?

Don't like paying taxes?

Well, how much tax etc. do you pay on each $ you earn? 30%? OK that original $1 is down to 70 cents. Now how much "sin tax" do you pay on smokes and booze? 30%? That's $0.70 x 0.30 = say $0.21. So you are 50 cents in the $ out in each $ you spend on smokes and booze?

Need another smoke and a drink while you are having a rant here about taxes and politicians etc? and getting an attack of high blood pressure and emphysema too?


Causes
The primary cause of emphysema is the smoking of cigarettes. In some cases it maybe due to alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. Severe cases of A1AD may also develop cirrhosis of the liver, where the accumulated A1AT leads to a fibrotic reaction.


Prognosis and treatment
Emphysema is an irreversible degenerative condition. The most important measure to slow its progression is for the patient to stop smoking and avoid all exposure to cigarette smoke and lung irritants. Pulmonary rehabilitation can be very helpful to optimize the patient's quality of life and teach the patient how to actively manage his or her care. Patients with emphysema and chronic bronchitis can do more for themselves than patients with any other disabling disease.

from:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emphasema

So smoke from the machine you are "hogging" or "tear-ar$ing" with is bad enough, but having a smoke while you have the machine in "auto" while you wait is not a good combination either.

Ever wonder why so many machinists are ill old men before their time compared to some others?

Do you think your wife and kids can't see it for themselves and can put "two and two" together?

Its hardly an incentive for them to get interested in machining and the shop or being a machinist as a career let alone a hobby is it?

Do you really think that if they think that that they enjoy seeing you shortening your life committing long-term suicide and with the potential of them have to look after you in a condition that may well have been self-caused?

Need any more incentives?

Astronowanabe
03-06-2010, 11:52 PM
Smoked like a fiend for 15 years, could kind of keep track of how things were going by packs smoked a day. Being mathematical it occurred to me that on a particular day in two weeks, I would be able to say I had smoked for half of my life. Decided I did not like how that sounded.
Took what was left of my pack an set it on the mantle where it would be in my face, and just said F**CK YOU (with feeling) when ever I got the urge.
First four or five days were the worst, nothing was what I wanted, didn't matter what it was. well the sound of smashing glass was ok.
After a couple of weeks I noticed I hadn't thought about them in a really long time ... like maybe half a day. And it just kept fading out, after five years or
so I could bar without any thought of lighting up. It will be 20 years ago this summer I quit and am in absolutely no danger of starting back up.

Best of luck to you, hope patches or whatever ease your way, but don't forget it is your way and you can do as you blankedy blank well please.

mochinist
03-06-2010, 11:54 PM
was in the local convenience store this morning buying some coffee and I noticed a pack of Marlboros that I used to smoke were over 6 dollars a pack. Thats in Arizona, I know prices vary buy state, but damn...

HSS
03-07-2010, 12:12 AM
Anyone try substituting something like hard candy or gum for smoking? There are just those times like late in the day when you pull the nob for the 5 minute wait of the power cross feed for the 20 time that you would normally light up and you just have an urge to do something.

Yeah, I substitute coffee. I love a good cup of coffee anytime of the day or night.

winchman
03-07-2010, 02:40 AM
I quit in 1962 after smoking one cigarette because my girlfriend told me I smelled nasty. One of my wiser decisions, I'd say.

Ryobiguy
03-07-2010, 03:52 AM
I quit almost exactly 1 week ago with the help of Chantix. Day 2-3 was awful.
Bought a whole lot of junk food, I think chocolate is the only good substitute while I'm getting used to not having the nicotine making my brain happy.

-Matt

malbenbut
03-07-2010, 04:48 AM
Its easy to stop smoking, I've done it lots of times.
MBB

Your Old Dog
03-07-2010, 07:49 AM
I quit almost exactly 1 week ago with the help of Chantix. Day 2-3 was awful.
Bought a whole lot of junk food, I think chocolate is the only good substitute while I'm getting used to not having the nicotine making my brain happy.

-Matt

Supposedly there are over 600 different things in a cigarette. After getting them all for over 20 years the body generates anti-bodies to fight them off. When you quit, the body has no hard and fast switch that it can throw so it is still putting out these antibodies.

I had cravings that each lasted about 2 weeks for: popcorn, chips, candy spearment leaves (two bags a day) chocolate and on and on.

Don't be surprised if your body oder gets really rank for awhile! At one point, the glands under my arm pits were like firm pillows when I showered.

I also went into a state of depression and this is not uncommon. If you find yourself slipping get some help from your doctor. If he says you can do it on your own find a new doctor. I was on a mild dose of Zanax for about 4-5 months. I was po'd that no one told me about the possibility of depression but I guess in their minds, the get a score for getting you to quit even if your life becomes a living hell. Even after all that, it's still worth it to me. It was a rotten habit I'm very glad to be done with it. Life is better on the other side of cigarettes.

Randolph
03-07-2010, 07:50 AM
I started smoking when I was 12 years old. When I quit in 1982 I was a supervisor in a union machine shop where the foremen couldn't have hands on tools. I was smoking three packs a day at the time and I quit cold turkey.

But I believe in being fair. I had been smoking for 30 years when I quit so I decided that I would not smoke for 30 years and then decide which life style suited me best.

A.K. Boomer
03-07-2010, 08:22 AM
iv heard nicotine is more addicting than heroin and although iv never tried heroin I can at least attest to just how tricky ciggies are and how they tried to creep into my life,

I would go to the pubs and drink lots of beer, in doing so I would drop my guard down and either "bum" ciggies from friends and or give them as much as $1.00 per ciggie, even dropping 4 or 5 bucks that way as long as I didn't take a pack home with me I thought I had the system beat, then almost without knowing I started showing up at the pubs more and more and it hit me it wasn't just to drink and socialize - it was to get my ciggie fix,
then I started buying my own packs and waking up the next day and flushing the remainder down the toilet, I would hate myself for what I was doing.
I bet I only smoked half the ciggies iv ever bought,

Even though my part time habit was totally on and off and I would leave them alone for years (or decades?) at a time it still got its hooks in me,
Iv been good for about 4 years with only a couple I had one night about 3 months ago (and one about a week after.)
They were from an old GF son and we were drinking some, the reason I wanted to try them is they were the american spirit "organic"
They were EXTREMELY powerful and knocked me on my ass,
About a week later I found myself craving one and went out and bought a pack,:o they were over $5.75:eek: I smoked about half of one and then the rest went into my wood stove to heat the house (most expensive heating fuel iv ever used)

Im cocky by nature and used to be able to flirt with them some, but its a battle I don't need to tease myself with anymore.

I read a statistic about 15 years ago when ciggies were a couple bucks a pack and it stated that if you figure in the medical costs that a pack of ciggies actually cost you about 12 bucks a pack,

Today that would mean at least $25.00 per pack

If that's a road some want to go down that's their decision - but if your trying to quit then good for you - and like someone else stated don't beat yourself up due to not getting it done the first second or thirtieth time, sometimes it takes multiple testing of the waters to figure out what your up against, so if you want to do it then don't quit on quitting --- lot of success stories here - kudo's to you guys and also to the ones who are trying.

John R
03-07-2010, 10:03 AM
I smoked for about 25 years starting with those 4-packs they gave away in college and finally stopping at 2-1/2 packs per day. I tried to stop many times only to go right back to it. Finally one day I lit up my first one of the day, told myself how stupid I was and never smoked another one. Now clean for 30 years but still think about it at coffee or beer time or when someone near by is smoking a cigar. It can be done!!!
good luck,
John R

vpt
03-07-2010, 11:37 AM
Drinking is the worst! They made all local businesses even bars in my town smoke free. But still after a few bottles of courage and standard killer it is natural to light up a twig. I just avoid the bars for now but eventually I'll have to go in one and fight the urge to smoke.

JTToner
03-07-2010, 12:17 PM
Quit "cold turkey" in the spring of 1975, never had one since. Others smoking never bothers me. Was doing 2+ packs/day, began at age 12.

boslab
03-07-2010, 09:26 PM
my better half dutifully informed me some time ago," you will never give up smoking, it will give you up first, she was right 5 heart attacks later it had given me up at last.....it rarely takes prisoners.
a few tips , know the beast....no ones addicted to smoking, only to nicotine, and the 300 odd additives that live with it including ammonia, sweeteners and some that are so comlicated ive seen chemists genuinly puzzled by what has shown up in the samples we stuffed through the instruments in work, Gas chromatographs and AA spectrometers, there all sorts in there thats way way above me as my chemistry only goes to ordinary degree, tobacco is a legal designer drug.
avoid nicotine gum, its worse, and more addictive than ciggs, the mints fare better.
before giving up do this, if your right handed only smoke with your left for a few weeks, helps break the paths up in the old gray matter, only 6 repititions of the smoking act send the info into the subconcious.
change as much about smoking habit as you can, ive seen some odd ways to acheive that including removing shoes! it worked??? its all about mind games with yourself, or rather your subconcious self where the habit is, remember to program yourself, repititions, you then know how to reprogram it took me 30 years to work out how, hypnosis is dubious, some swear by it but all the facts show that its not that effective as your brain is designed not to let itself be influenced by any voice but your own, so use your own.
Ans plese give the **** up if you can, just look at the toys you can buy with the money, i cant get in my garage anymore! thats somthing to look foreward to.
regards
mark [4 years ex smoker, and dont even miss it anymore, feels good to be free, try it you will love it]

Black_Moons
03-07-2010, 10:22 PM
As for money. a little math perhapse!
$7 pack, times 1 pack a day for 365 days a year = $2555
Thats enough to buy any one of the following, every year you don't smoke, shiping included:
a new IH bench mill (30x12x19" xyz travel)
a new 10x22 lathe
A second hand surface grinder.
Enough 1/2" steel plate to cover your shop floor.. Might do better as a table but whatever, you got $2555 to waste now!
One very overpriced MADE in USA rotary table or XY table.
125 $20 endmills.
250 good 5/8" HSS blanks
300+ Carbide inserts
7015 horror freight drill bits! (61 $40 115 peice drill bit sets sets)
1380 Not so horror freight drill bits! (12 sets * 115 at $200)
a 52" TV with excessive 5 year warrentee plan. (Not everythings gotta be for the shop)
a trip for two anywhere in the world (Just incase the wife needs a reason too)


Most of this also still stands if you buy it now on your credit card, and pay $7/day off to your credit card for the next year. No need to wait! Come on, you can quit for a new (insert item from list).. every.. YEAR.

Fasttrack
03-07-2010, 10:39 PM
As for money. a little math perhapse!
$7 pack, times 1 pack a day for 365 days a year = $2555
Thats enough to buy any one of the following, every year you don't smoke, shiping included:
a new IH bench mill (30x12x19" xyz travel)
a new 10x22 lathe
A second hand surface grinder.
Enough 1/2" steel plate to cover your shop floor.. Might do better as a table but whatever, you got $2555 to waste now!
One very overpriced MADE in USA rotary table or XY table.
125 $20 endmills.
250 good 5/8" HSS blanks
300+ Carbide inserts
7015 horror freight drill bits! (61 $40 115 peice drill bit sets sets)
1380 Not so horror freight drill bits! (12 sets * 115 at $200)
a 52" TV with excessive 5 year warrentee plan. (Not everythings gotta be for the shop)
a trip for two anywhere in the world (Just incase the wife needs a reason too)


Most of this also still stands if you buy it now on your credit card, and pay $7/day off to your credit card for the next year. No need to wait! Come on, you can quit for a new (insert item from list).. every.. YEAR.


That makes me want to start smoking ... just so I can try to quit and justify buying all those goodies :D

darryl
03-07-2010, 10:57 PM
Well, today was my friends last cigarette day, on the Champax thing. I hope she makes it.

saltmine
03-08-2010, 01:21 AM
Let's see....When I quit smoking, I was doing two or more packs of smokes a day. Of course, Marlboros were 45 cents a pack, at the time. (and I was hard pressed to afford them at times)

Today, the same pack is $7 a pack, so I'd be smoking $21 a day worth of stinking, nasty, cigarettes. What used to cost me $164.25 a year is now $7665...Wow!

Of course, if I hadn't quit smoking, I'd probably be dead, or disabled by now.

Sadly, I've lost many old friends to the evil weed.

Strangely, most people don't really want to quit smoking.

A few years ago, I bought a new (to me) car. Since I don't smoke, I always ask people who ride in it not to smoke. True to form, one friend asked for a ride in the "new ride".....So, I said OK, and we went out to get into the car.
His butt no sooner hit the seat and he was pulling a cigarette out, getting ready to light it. I told him I didn't want anybody smoking in my car.

A look flashed across his face, like I'd smacked him with a rotting mackerel, he opened the door, and got out, lit the smoke, and walked away. I haven't seen him since, and that was five years ago.

Reminds me of an old Steve Martin monologue. He was going on about second-hand smoke.
A guy at the next table in a resturant leaned over and asked him,"Do you mind if we smoke?"...."Do you mind if we FART?" was his reply.

ulav8r
03-08-2010, 01:30 AM
Haven't smoked in 50 years. Quit about 1 minute after starting. Haven't missed it at all.:D

oldtiffie
03-08-2010, 03:06 AM
Perhaps the difficulty of "giving up" smoking - which is addictive - is not a great deal - if any - different to anyone who is addicted to medication or opiates etc. and seem to have the same problems as regards the addiction.

Quite a group to be lumped in with isn't it?

Here's another warning and incentive:


Malignant tumors
Malignant tumors, or cancers of the respiratory system, particularly lung cancers, are a major health problem responsible for 15% of all cancer diagnoses and 29% of all cancer deaths[5]. The majority of respiratory system cancers are attributable to smoking tobacco.

and:


Treatment of respiratory system cancer depends on the type of cancer. Surgery (usually removal of part of the lung, a lobectomy or an entire lung, a pneumonectomy), chemotherapy and radiotherapy are all used. The chance of surviving lung cancer depends on the cancer stage at the time the cancer is diagnosed and is only about 14-17% overall[6]. In the case of metastases to the lung, treatment can occasionally be curative but only in certain, rare circumstances.

from:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lung_disease

Now I am sure that all the "macho"-men smokers here who are going to give it up are 6 feet wide across the tits, 10 feet high and charged with buckets full or "can do" and Testosterone will have no trouble giving it up - or are they really THAT bullet-proof?

Are the fumes in your shop giving you trouble? Or is just the fumes?

A friend of mine who was a smoker and who swam several miles a day - pool and sea-surf was seeing his Doctor for "leg" problems. It turned out that he had a bad case of "blocked arteries/veins". While he was having a scan for the lower part of his body, the specialists decided to do a "whole of body" scan and lo and behold there was a very large aneurysm near his heart. The surgeon said that it was essential that it be removed as soon as possible but as he was a heavy smoker the risk was too high and that he would have to be off the smokes for at least three months until they would review him to see if he was fit enough for surgery. They told him to go home and take it easy and not to worry!!. He had tried often enough before and failed - to give up smoking - but not this time!! He had his operation which was a success, but the worry and waiting really affected his wife who was a chronic "worrier" and she died after a couple of months because of it. He never really got over it.

boslab
03-08-2010, 05:20 AM
just to add, talked to a bored smoking chemist who decided to test his urine for cigg tobaccoo toxins, and found benzine, toluine and xylene, a touch of napthalene and a load of other stuff like nitro-benzine and cyclohexane.
he wasent sure where the lead was coming from, neither am i but was there in a small dose [ppb]
a recipie for bladder cancer perhaps, so its not just lungs and heart at risk.
i'd definatly rather a new bridgeport with a dro to seeing what its like to have your bladder removed and replaced with a bag and hose.

oldtiffie
03-08-2010, 05:30 AM
a recipie for bladder cancer perhaps

Thanks boslab.

Perhaps we can be a bit more certain and definitive than "perhaps" and assume it to be "very probable":


Causes
Tobacco smoking is the main known cause of urinary bladder cancer: in most populations, smoking causes over half of bladder cancer cases in men and a sizeable proportion in women. There is a linear relationship between smoking and risk, and quitting smoking reduces the risk.[2] In a 10-year study involving almost 48,000 men, researchers found that men who drank 1.5L of water a day had a significantly reduced incidence of bladder cancer when compared with men who drank less than 240mL (around 1 cup) per day. The authors proposed that bladder cancer might partly be caused by the bladder directly contacting carcinogens that are excreted in urine. Thirty percent of bladder tumors probably result from occupational exposure in the workplace to carcinogens such as benzidine. 2-Naphthylamine, which is found in cigarette smoke, has also been shown to increase bladder cancer risk. Occupations at risk are metal industry workers, rubber industry workers, workers in the textile industry, and people who work in printing. Some studies also suggest that auto mechanics have an elevated risk of bladder cancer due to their frequent exposure to hydrocarbons and petroleum-based chemicals.[3] Hairdressers are thought to be at risk as well because of their frequent exposure to permanent hair dyes.

from:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bladder_cancer

vpt
03-08-2010, 07:18 AM
Very good helpful info here! Thanks guys!

bruto
03-08-2010, 10:51 AM
I'm a bit busy so haven't read the whole thread. I will add, though, that I quit smoking cold turkey 22 years ago next month. I'd smoked since my teenage years, and quit at 40. I was about to get married to a non-smoker, which of course helped a great deal, but I'd also been trying to quit for some time. It was difficult, and I dreamt about smoking and cheating for years afterwards.

It can be done. Everything you can do to convince yourself to do it is worthwhile. Every time you refuse to bow to the temptation to have "just this one" is a victory that will pay off many times over, and everything you can do to change or break old patterns of behavior can help too. A new hobby, a new sort of exercise that doesn't tolerate shortness of breath (I started bicycling), even a new order to the way you serve out your breakfast, etc. - all the little points of your day during which you had the habit of lighting up to make the occasion complete need to be re-engineered a little so that it's complete without a smoke. I always lit up when I got in the car, always when I got on the phone, etc. You need to become conscious of these triggers and overcome them, because it is a true addiction, even though at some point you can consider yourself entirely over it, rather than just "recoveriing." Start looking ahead to your future, and seeing yourself as a non-smoker. Make that a part of the way you visualize your future life and behavior. A lot of this has to do with what you envision for yourself, and how you perceive your own identity, or (hate the damn word, but here it comes) lifestyle.

It can be done. It's hard now to look back and think that I once smoked. I'm healthier and fitter now than I was 25 years ago, and I don't miss it now, but it took a long time to get the little traces of the habit out of my system.

Evan
03-08-2010, 01:35 PM
I would be toast if I quit smoking. One of the side effects of fibromyalgia is called "fibro-fog". Crappy memory and an inability to concentrate. It turns out that smoking tobacco isn't all bad. It has been shown scientifically recently that nicotine improves memory, ability to concentrate and may be useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's. As a secondary benefit it kills tapeworms. :D

I only smoke the equivalent of about 3 cigs a day in my pipe so it doesn't cost much. I can't stand cigarettes, they smell nasty.

Part of quitting is related to the loss of the stimulant effect on your brain. Stimulants are not physically addicting but they are intensely psychologically addictive, similar to crack cocaine. Comparing nicotine to heroin is inaccurate because heroin is high physically addictive but relatively harmless to the body if taken in moderation.

John Stevenson
03-08-2010, 02:30 PM
I have never smoked, tried them a few times but couldn't get any benefit out of them, however it doesn't bother me if people want to smoke.

Gert used to smoke terrible, three packs a day as I knew to.
She smoked that much she didn't have a period, she had a fall of soot.

Daughter smoked as well and they made a pact about 6 years ago when we were going on holiday together to Morocco they would put the patches on and throw the cigarrets away at the airport.

Both were as good as their words and have never smoked again.

However I think the smoking nazi's are going too far, no smoking in pubs here, many have put a veranda up outside so smokers can light up there or they stand outside and throw butts all over the pavement.
Years ago there were two rooms in pubs, the bar for working guys, work clothes etc and the lounge for when you had your best togs on.
You could smoke in the bar but not in the lounge, I though that worked very well until some idiot decided better.

Laser company have always had a no smoking policy in the canteen and offices, if you want to smoke go on the shop floor and stand by the laser cutters and light up.
Now we have the no workplace smoking ban they have to go outside meanwhile the laser cutters are still throwing off the same fumes and shït as before ?

If I smoked I couldn't smoke in my shop because it's a registered workplace and open to the public, some day I can't see because of cutting oil smoke and welding fumes.

.

Mike Hunter
03-08-2010, 03:30 PM
Smoked for 20+years …quit ….can’t stand the stuff.

One of the better quotes: “Tobacco is the only substance, when used as directed, WILL KILL YOU”

Ryobiguy
03-08-2010, 04:38 PM
One of the better quotes: “Tobacco is the only
substance, when used as directed, WILL KILL YOU”

Here's one of my favorites: "LIFE: it's sexually transmitted and ALWAYS fatal."
:D
-Matt

Evan
03-08-2010, 05:27 PM
"A baby is the most complex and advanced product in the world yet it can be made at home by completely unskilled labour."

boslab
03-08-2010, 07:15 PM
Sorry to hear bout your affliction Evan, glad the poison works for you, i still hate the dam stuff it ruins most it touches, but slowley, so many dead it amazes me when i see the figures like someone was talking about interstellar distances not funerals.
Your quite right Oldtiffie a point well made, excuse me i was being a little facetious, which given those among us who are presantly suffering through disease and addiction is wholly inappropriate, self included.
Carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the smoke is interesting too, i was recently told that it is able to catalyse fats, aka hydrogination, wonder if thats the blocking up process of arteries [mine are!]
Unless you have the same thing as Evan, i would suggest it wiser, cheaper and quicker to ingest so Cyanide [CN], blood turns to jellow, brain shuts down, no more worry about the next fix, saves a whole lot of pain.
when i was last in the hospital i had a rather black chat with a fellow patient who had just had his legs off through smoking, he reckoned that he dident need them to chase women anymore cos his manhood had stopped working years before....another side effect if you last long enough.
mark

smalltime
03-08-2010, 08:29 PM
Smoking Nazis just make me laugh.
Next thing will be the fat police and the then the drinking police.........

BTW 10/11/08 @6:01 was my last cigarette.:cool:

Astronowanabe
03-08-2010, 09:55 PM
"A baby is the most complex and advanced product in the world yet it can be made at home by completely unskilled labour."


Man is the best computer we can put aboard
a spacecraft - and the only one that can be
mass produced with unskilled labor.
- Wernher von Braun (1912- 1977)

spope14
03-08-2010, 10:00 PM
Cigarettes, 1988. Cigars, well....still in progress, but very seldom now compared to five a week a year ago. Last one yesterday, the one before that two weeks back. Ten bucks a cigar, realizing how much less I stink, and finding new "long term energy" did it for me. I will most likely quit when the humidor runs out, I think about a dozen left.