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gregl
03-10-2010, 10:24 AM
Pulled some R6 bearings that were seated with the green Loctite bearing retainer. While I can scrape the residue off with a small wire brush in a Dremel tool, I have a bunch of these to do and this is rather tedious and time consuming. Tried acetone with little success. Any other chemicals you might suggest?

Thanks.

vpt
03-10-2010, 10:33 AM
I think green loctite is supposed to be heated to come apart.

Will a wire wheel work?

Evan
03-10-2010, 10:36 AM
Try fingernail polish remover or just acetone. Loctite is based on cyanoacrylate glue.

oops, missed your comment. Paint stripper then or if you can get it straight methylene chloride.

actionaj
03-10-2010, 10:38 AM
That green loc-tite is some tough stuff. Scraping and wire brushing it is the only way I know to get it off. I also have burned it off with a torch and that is not a lot fun either. It must be some type of an epoxy every solvent I have tried wouldn't touch it.

BillDaCatt
03-10-2010, 10:42 AM
Try Lacquer Thinner , Toluene, or Xylene. One of those should get it. Wear heavy gloves and a paint respirator though, each of those is nasty in its own way.

Evan
03-10-2010, 10:50 AM
While we are on this subject does anybody know of a solvent to remove the paint from the back of a mirror? The latest coatings are impervious to everything I have. Physical contact removal is not an option. Also, it must not harm the aluminum coating so nitric acid is out.

vpt
03-10-2010, 11:22 AM
While we are on this subject does anybody know of a solvent to remove the paint from the back of a mirror? The latest coatings are impervious to everything I have. Physical contact removal is not an option. Also, it must not harm the aluminum coating so nitric acid is out.



Heat?

Have you tried plain old aircraft paint stripper?

EVguru
03-10-2010, 11:36 AM
How did you get the bearings out?

If you applied significant force to the inner race, then you may well have brinelled them.

vpt
03-10-2010, 11:55 AM
Loctite 290 Green threadlocker is a low viscosity threadlocking liquid that wicks along the threadsof pre-assembled fasteners to secure them in place. Since it is applied after assembly, preventive maintenance procedures are simplified. Ideal for fasteners ranging from #2 to 1/2" (2.2 to 12mm) in size. Localized heating and hand tools needed for disassembly. Suggested applications: Bolts on alternators, air conditioning belts and distributor clamps, carburetor adjustment screws, and hairline cracks.

Video Man
03-10-2010, 12:24 PM
Loctite 290 Green threadlocker is a low viscosity threadlocking liquid that wicks along the threadsof pre-assembled fasteners to secure them in place.
I believe the OP has Loctite 640 Sleeve Retainer, which is also green, but a way different product than the wicking threadlocker....it's tough stuff! / video_man

gregl
03-10-2010, 12:47 PM
Thanks, guys. It was Loctite 609 between the inner race and the shaft. The bearings are out but I need to remove the residue from the shafts before installing new bearings. There are 16 of them to do and while I can get it off with a wire brush in a Dremel tool, it's tedious and time consuming and I was hoping that some liquid would soften or dissolve the Loctite. Since the acetone hasn't done it, I'll try lacquer thinner and alcohol. Otherwise, I guess I'll pull up a stool and get comfortable with the Dremel.

vpt
03-10-2010, 12:52 PM
What is the shaft material and thickness? Maybe you can lightly heat the loctite with a propane torch a bit to get the loctite to soften up some where you can wipe it off fast with a good shop rag or with brass wool.

Evan
03-10-2010, 01:07 PM
I have tried methylene chloride paint stripper on the mirrors and they just laugh at it. The stuff is nuclear proof. I have a pretty wide range of solvents and nothing touches it. I can't use heat because it will break the glass.

Re the OP, get yourself a fine circular brass brush and stick it in a regular drill motor. Make an extension if you must. Hold the brush against a grinding wheel to take it down to the size needed to just fit in the bearing seat with some bending of the bristles. That will work a lot faster than a Dremel. Use a little boiling water to soften it.

gregl
03-10-2010, 03:24 PM
Well, guys, so far the Loctite has resisted liquid solvents. I don't want to use a torch because of the possibility of damaging the assembly. The wire brush is working, so I'll just sit back, relax, and take it off a bit at a time. Thanks for your suggestions.

The Artful Bodger
03-10-2010, 04:15 PM
Does Loctite survive boiling (in water) for a period of time?

Tinkerer
03-10-2010, 05:12 PM
Could give Easy Off oven cleaner a try.... That goes for you as well Evan on the mirror. As with anything try it on a small spot or a junk mirror... gloves... moon suit ect... I've used it to remove some stubborn stuff so may work for the two of you.

Evan
03-10-2010, 05:58 PM
Easy off will instantly attack the aluminum if it removes the back paint. I am looking for a way to make cheap front surface mirrors. Nearly all the mirrors from China these days are aluminized and not silvered so it has to be something that will leave the aluminum alone.

oldtiffie
03-10-2010, 06:08 PM
Thanks, guys. It was Loctite 609 between the inner race and the shaft. The bearings are out but I need to remove the residue from the shafts before installing new bearings. There are 16 of them to do and while I can get it off with a wire brush in a Dremel tool, it's tedious and time consuming and I was hoping that some liquid would soften or dissolve the Loctite. Since the acetone hasn't done it, I'll try lacquer thinner and alcohol. Otherwise, I guess I'll pull up a stool and get comfortable with the Dremel.

See this Loctite 609n data sheet - top of left column - page 3:
http://tds.loctite.com/tds5/docs/609-EN.PDF

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&q=loctite+removal+solvent&meta=&aq=0c&oq=loctite+solvent&fp=2de49ba9ead933c3

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&source=hp&q=loctite+609+datasheet&meta=&aq=0&oq=Loctite+609+&fp=2de49ba9ead933c3

gregl
03-10-2010, 09:12 PM
Well, it all came off with the wire brush. Didn't take all that much time but for the trip to the hardware store for a second brush; the first having given up its bristles about half way through the project. The residue was tenacious but I got it all without damage to the shafts.

Rich Carlstedt
03-10-2010, 09:16 PM
The cleaner for Loctite is nitromethane AKA "nitro"
Maybe some model airplane engine fuel will work ? but that may be cut with oil.
Worth a try

Rich

darryl
03-10-2010, 11:46 PM
I was thinking that maybe white gas would have done it. Probably not, but who knows-

Evan
03-11-2010, 01:21 AM
White gas is plain Naptha which is just a slightly lighter fraction than white spirits (Stoddard Solvent). I very much doubt that it would work on Loctite since Loctite will often be used in a petroleum contaminated environment.

MichaelP
03-11-2010, 09:22 AM
I am looking for a way to make cheap front surface mirrors.
If I remember correctly, in my teen years we made mirrors using glucose and ammoniacal silver nitrate. We didn't use them as surface mirrors though, so I have no recollection of the mirror quality of the silvered side.

Evan
03-11-2010, 10:36 AM
It is relatively easy to make very good mirrors using float glass and silvering. What isn't easy is getting silver nitrate these days. It is way overpriced and a hazmat material. It is illegal to ship it out of the US and there aren't any reasonable Canadian suppliers that I can find.

gregl
03-11-2010, 11:28 AM
As this thread drifts off topic, I'll add that silver nitrate is available from Photographers' Formulary: http://www.photoformulary.com. Be sure supplemental oxygen is available before you check the price.

darryl
03-11-2010, 01:33 PM
I see you can buy 1/50 of a pound of salt for 3.50, or a pound for 5.00.

Warning- I didn't have my oxygen handy when I went straight to the 1 lb qty of silver nitrate- now I'm gasping for breath :) What would one do with a pound of it anyway- I can imagine that it would go a long way-