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AlexK
04-02-2010, 04:31 PM
Right now I have a cheap and crappy drill press vise like this:
http://lh5.ggpht.com/_gzA6aeqk3VE/S7ZRZ_u_DCI/AAAAAAAABIs/e_o9PAzbPlo/dp_vise.JPG

The jaw on this vise is very loose and raising or lifting a lot.

I am looking for a better drill press vise. I don't need a Kurt vise precision on a drill press but still want something relatively nice.

I found this generic Chinese vise (7"x 2.5") on eBay for $40:
http://lh5.ggpht.com/_gzA6aeqk3VE/S7ZRZapVPzI/AAAAAAAABIo/ykaMes7N76I/vise.JPG

According to description it has:
ground "V" way
square and parallel to 0.005mm

Mostly I clamp a part into the drill press vise for two purposes:
1. It won't catch and rotate hitting me.
2. It won't catch and lift when drill bit breaks through the bottom.
For this I also would clamp the vise to the table. (Just hand tightening bolts)

Is it a good practical vise for a drill press?

38_Cal
04-02-2010, 04:57 PM
Alex, is there an adjustment screw/s on the bottom of the moveable jaw that you can snug up a bit? My ChiCom drill press vise uses a plate with two screws to limit play in the moveable jaw, though it's not the type you show.

David

C.BRAXMAIER
04-02-2010, 06:44 PM
I love this vise from lathemaster here is a link. http://www.lathemaster.com/Drill%20Vise.htm

JCD
04-02-2010, 06:46 PM
A very short time ago, Wilton was considered the premier Drill press vice.
What a shame, to go from the best to to of the worst in just a few years.
There seems to be a lot of that going on.
I think I'm just getting old.

digr
04-02-2010, 07:07 PM
I made this one (http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13753)

fahnoe
04-02-2010, 07:49 PM
The Heinrich vises are very nice, Grip-Master vise (http://www.heinrichco.com/gpvise.htm). Once you feel and see how nicely they work, the traditional screw type will seem very clunky to use. Also nice to see that they are still made in the USA.

--Larry

reggie_obe
04-02-2010, 08:15 PM
I'll second the Heinrich vises. The Chinee vise in the first image is the same style of junk vise they've been producing since around 1980. The only thing diffferent with this one is the Wilton label.

Jim Shaper
04-02-2010, 08:27 PM
Stay away from the elephant brand (generic import option) from enco on cam style vises. I got one and the lock mechanism was hardened and the shaft was soft, so every time you locked the jaw you'd nick the shaft and it would raise a burr that was then hard to pull the soft jaw over to open it back up. Needless to say, it went back at their expense.

Ken_Shea
04-02-2010, 09:30 PM
Stay away from the elephant brand (generic import option) from enco on cam style vises. I got one and the lock mechanism was hardened and the shaft was soft, so every time you locked the jaw you'd nick the shaft and it would raise a burr that was then hard to pull the soft jaw over to open it back up. Needless to say, it went back at their expense.

That frequently amazes me, so often just a little more attention to quality in just a few areas would result in such a much better product.

Jim Shaper
04-02-2010, 09:36 PM
Well, the asian kid making the copy didn't understand how the devise works.

It must be abstract to them, that when you press a soft metal along a harder one, there's still plenty of friction potential there.

gwilson
04-02-2010, 09:56 PM
I got an old Speedy vise at Cabin Fever. It has the screw 1/2 embedded into a nut that is part of the casting. The screw is a buttress type,with a hollow gripping face so it can't pop loose. You just loosen the screw,lift it out,slide the jaw up to the work,drop the screw into its half nut,and tighten.

These have been around for ages. I also had bought a Starrett vise of the same design from MSC. The last one they sold of its kind. that was for my former job,though. It had a blow hole in the casting where the nut was threaded. Not too bad,but I could have done without it! I think Speedy made them better.

Ken_Shea
04-02-2010, 11:07 PM
Speaking of vises,
I had purchased an old Delta drill press a while back, the biggest reason was the vise on it, had never seen one like it, looks original to press. It is actually the drill press table, but is split and opens up like a vise, also fully rotates and swivels in it's base that is attached to the column. I'll take some better pics tomorrow when it's light out as it's out side. (yes covered) :). It really is a slick set up and very HD, the table/vise alone must weigh 60-70 pounds.
Here is a little picture that may give some idea on the table vise.

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x175/Ken_Shea/Image1-2.jpg

Doc Nickel
04-03-2010, 12:08 AM
It is actually the drill press table, but is split and opens up like a vise, also fully rotates and swivels in it's base that is attached to the column.

-There's been a couple like that, that have shown up over at PM. One, as I recall, came on a late-model "camelback" drill, probably from the 40's. Old enough it still had the cone pulley on the base running the long belt up to the upper shaft, but new enough the motor drive was original and cast into the baseplate.

Anyway, the table was some 16" in diameter, and just as yours, split in half with one section being a movable vise jaw.

I've been keeping an eye out for one myself. :D

Doc.

Paul Alciatore
04-03-2010, 03:51 AM
The rising jaw is primarily a problem for a milling vise where a thin part must be supported at the top of the jaws to allow clearance above them for the cutter to enter and exit the cut on the sides. This illustrates the reason why the jaw lifts: actually, it rotates and lifts from that rotation.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v55/EPAIII/ViseLift.jpg

A better made vise will have ground surfaces on both the tops and the bottoms of the ways to help prevent this. Longer sliding surfaces on the movable jaw will also help. Another common ploy is to use rods to guide the movable jaw and this can also help.

The ground machinist's vise you show should be better than the Wilton. But it may also exhibit some tendency to rise since it keeps the conventional screw for tightening. Since I can't yet afford a high quality milling vise, I personally prefer the style of machinist vise that is sometimes called "screwless". They do have a shorter screw, but it is angled 45 degrees down to a movable pin below the ways. This combination of clamping and downward motion almost completely prevents the jaw from rising. Import versions can be purchased for $60 or so.

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=443&PARTPG=INLMK3&PMITEM=428-9020

You may have to watch for a sale to get the price I mentioned. But I got a 2.5 inch one for about that and it is excellent.

However, I did say that this problem is primarily evident when milling. In a drill press, the part can be laid on top of the ways with the area being drilled either between them or outboard of the side. When it lies on the ways, there is much less tendency for the jaw to rise. I use a vise that is not even as good as the Wilton you show on my drill press all the time with no problems. But I keep the parts DOWN on the vise's ways, not up at their tops.

AlexK
04-03-2010, 03:56 AM
Paul,

I do have the "screwless" vise but I don't have the patience to fiddle with it every time I need to drill a hole. It take a good couple minutes to clamp something in it.

AlexK
04-03-2010, 04:25 AM
This Heinrich 4-GM looks really nice.
MSC sells it for $240.
I'll start saving ...


http://www.millvises.com/HEINRICH/HEINRICH-GRIP-MASTER-PUSH-OR-PULL-4-GM-alone.jpg

EVguru
04-03-2010, 05:55 AM
Cronos in the UK have been selling some quite nice drill vices for some time;

http://www.chronos.ltd.uk/acatalog/110170l.jpg

They've even been describes as 'light' milling vices and I've certainly used one for that on a couple of occasions.

http://www.chronos.ltd.uk/cgi-local/sh000001.pl?REFPAGE=http%3a%2f%2fwww%2echronos%2el td%2euk%2fcgi%2dlocal%2fss000001%2epl%3fpage%3dsea rch%26SS%3dvice%26PR%3d%2d1%26TB%3dA&WD=vice&PN=Chronos_Catalogue_Heavy_Drill_Press_Vices_108%2 ehtml%23a110172#a110172

TR
04-03-2010, 07:49 AM
I use this one made by Safeway.

http://i663.photobucket.com/albums/uu354/topari/16264.jpg

https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Products?stockCode=V143

It has the push down feature. Sells for about AUS $250.

Boucher
04-03-2010, 09:13 AM
I also have one like the Wilton shown. I have been thinking about kind of using it as a kit as a basis for building a better one.

hornluv
04-03-2010, 09:22 AM
I did some mods on my cheap drill press vise, starting with milling the bottom flat (it just had four nubs in the corners as the contact points for the table) and then the ways flat to that. Then I shaved a bit off the movable jaw so it was the same thickness as the ways instead of .015 taller like it was before I started the milling. Lastly, I made a longer plate to hold the movable jaw to the ways. I made it 3x as long as the jaw itself with the jaw place right in the middle. With the tighter tolerance between the jaw and ways and the length of the plate, the jaw doesn't lift noticeably at all. It does still tilt a bit side to side. But that wasn't as much a concern of mine at the time.

moldmonkey
04-03-2010, 09:46 AM
Heinrich vises are nice. It's also handy to have a vise that can be used on it's side so you can drill on the end of a workpiece without breaking out an angle plate and clamps.

HERE (http://www.mcmaster.com/ctlg/DisplCtlgPage.aspx?ReqTyp=CATALOG&CtlgPgNbr=2553&RelatedCtlgPgs=2554,2552,2553,2551,2555,2550,1023, 2408,2549&CtlgEdition=116&ScreenWidth=1152&McMMainWidth=841&ToolsetID=ToolMultiPageNav&ToolsetAct=)

I personally prefer not using the toolmakers?screwless vises on the mill or DP.

Mcgyver
04-03-2010, 10:05 AM
A very short time ago, Wilton was considered the premier Drill press vice.
What a shame, to go from the best to to of the worst in just a few years.
There seems to be a lot of that going on.
I think I'm just getting old.


or did he just find a pic of the style and didn't think further.....bet the one he has isn't a Wilton

Alex, the second pic you put up is a grinding vise, not appropriate imo. its a little small - one of the things a drill press vise does is give more mass and bigger area of contact with the table to small parts, this makes it easier to keep things from lifting or rotating. (safety note, I do not clamp to the table for small holes, but always have a large piece of angle iron bolted to the table so the vise/work cannot spin)

the thread title says you want good quality....maybe you have to expand the search beyond chinese imports? I've an old Palmgren that I've been happy with, not top of the line stuff, but decent.

Lew Hartswick
04-03-2010, 10:24 AM
I use this one made by Safeway.

http://i663.photobucket.com/albums/uu354/topari/16264.jpg

https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Products?stockCode=V143

It has the push down feature. Sells for about AUS $250.
That is one nice looking vise. I don't think I like where the hold-downs are
but otherwise looks about on a par with a Kurt. How big is that one?
...lew...

reggie_obe
04-03-2010, 10:50 AM
Heinrich vises appear on Ebay with regularity. Even Palmgren is said to be importing stuff from China now.

Paul Alciatore
04-03-2010, 11:25 AM
Paul,

I do have the "screwless" vise but I don't have the patience to fiddle with it every time I need to drill a hole. It take a good couple minutes to clamp something in it.

Well, it does take a bit longer, but two minutes?? Perhaps 20 seconds vs. five.

As I said, I have a bunch of vises and choose the best one for the job at hand. Most drilling jobs can be accomplished quite nicely with even cheaper vises than the Wilton you show. Of course, milling is another question.

J Tiers
04-03-2010, 11:39 AM
How many of you (if ANY) have one of the "safety" vises for the DP... The type with an arm and table mounting that keeps the drill from taking charge and spinning the work and/or vise around and tearing up your hand?

I don't, but I use a vise clamped down on an X-Y table, so it is even more secure. But the DP in question is a 7 foot tall Industrial Atlas/Clausing, so the precaution is practical.


Heinrich vises appear on Ebay with regularity. Even Palmgren is said to be importing stuff from China now.


Palmgren has been doing that for years and years. I don't think they have ANY US-made stuff anymore. If they do, it will likely be only a few items.