PDA

View Full Version : Flycutters and brazed carbide.



Black_Moons
04-07-2010, 12:46 AM
What type of brazed carbide tool should I buy to mount in a flycutter? as in AL or BL style?
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=169&PARTPG=INLMK32
My flycutters hold the bit at 20 degrees offset.

Any modifications I should do to the tool form?

And what carbide grade is recommended for descaleing hot rolled steel? (as in C2 C5 C6)

Does having a 45 degree lead angle help or hurt when descaleing hot rolled steel?

Your Old Dog
04-07-2010, 08:25 AM
.......................
And what carbide grade is recommended for descaleing hot rolled steel? (as in C2 C5 C6)

Does having a 45 degree lead angle help or hurt when descaleing hot rolled steel?

bump

Can somebody get this man an answer? :D I'd like to know too. Hope to start making knives out of D2 and the bark on it just kills those 2x72 grinder belts. I have a mill, I'd like to try plaining them instead of grinding it off.

Lew Hartswick
04-07-2010, 09:29 AM
Use HSS and get below the scale.
...lew...

Bill Pace
04-07-2010, 10:00 AM
I use the AL style and I just get those cheapo ones (similar to those at Enco)

I find that these are, hands down, the best and fastest way to get a piece of that rusty, scale coated chunk I scrounged from the scrap yard cleaned off. Even at that, rust and scale will blunt the edge pretty easily and if I find I have to do several pieces, I may have to touch up the edge on the diamond wheel. I put a sharp corner on and then, free handed, just touch up a slight rounded corned. In my experience, HSS sometimes wouldnt even last thru my first piece before starting to hammer so loudly and give a terrible finish...

Recently, I finally threw away a tool that had been ground to where there was too little area left to work with -- It had cleaned up many a sq ft of scrap yard steel. I even use these to get that final "mirror finish" I never put a piece of HSS in the tool anymore!

Peter.
04-07-2010, 11:08 AM
This is what I've made. It rips off scale like nobody's business and you can run it a lot faster than a HSS cutter. Also doesn't mind interrupted cuts at all. The stem is turned to fit a 3/4 collet.

http://peterrimmer.myby.co.uk/images/flycutter.jpg

Machinist-Guide
04-07-2010, 11:22 AM
I use the AL and have found they work best if you grind the point to a radii. The sharp point can't hold up to the interupted cut. HSS works ok on HRS

Here is some info. I got from the MSC catalog
C-2 is for Cast Iron and Nonferrous Metals
C-6 is for steel
C-5 is good for both

Carld
04-07-2010, 01:56 PM
AL brazed carbide with the leading edge at a 45 deg angle to the work WHEN the cutter is in the flycutter. That means if your flycutter has a 20 deg angle then the leading edge of the cutter in your hand will have a 65 deg angle on it. The angled leading edge cuts much smoother than a 90 deg leading angle.

As to grade I use C5 or 6 but for the interrupted cut when flycutting a C2 may be better. Although I have never had an issue using C5-6 grade flycutting at 1000+ rpm at fast feeds.

beanbag
04-08-2010, 05:26 AM
Would it be helpful at all if I just told you to buy a d@mn 45 degree face mill?

PixMan
04-08-2010, 07:29 AM
If I were tooling up to do this on a budget, I truly believe a great deal of money and especially frustration would be saved by getting a inserted face mill.

CDCO Tools has a sweet little 2-1/2" 15-lead face mill that takes 4 square SPG422 inserts. The integral R8 shank tool costs a whopping $45, plus inserts. Those can be had from a variety of sources in a wide range of grades, coatings and edge preps. The tool will absolutely out-perform any fly cutter, and be more gentle on spindle bearings. Moreover, the inserts can be true milling grades, as opposed to using lathe tools for milling applications.

http://www.cdcotools.com/

You have to "drill down" a bit from the "Cutting Tools" tab to find that milling cutter.

Overall, I think money would be saved and the job would be done so much easier. Myself, I got a Widia 45 lead 4-insert 2-1/2" face mill for next to nothing off of Ebay (uses SP43 size inserts), and I couldn't be more impressed at just how easily and quickly it plows through materials. I have fly cutters, they're used rarely, and only to take a wide finish pass.

Lew Hartswick
04-08-2010, 10:42 AM
This is what I've made. It rips off scale like nobody's business and you can run it a lot faster than a HSS cutter. Also doesn't mind interrupted cuts at all. The stem is turned to fit a 3/4 collet.

Peter what insert is that? I may have to make one of those. It looks
like a "solution waiting for a problem" to me. :-) I like to build things
like that just for the fun of it.
...Lew...

Carld
04-08-2010, 11:38 AM
Lew, I was looking at his cutter and was thinking if I made it so I could have the insert mounted on one side at the 90 deg angle on one side and at a 45 deg angle on the other side and use the insert in which ever mounting spot I need it may be a handy tool.

Machinist-Guide
04-08-2010, 01:05 PM
Lew, I was looking at his cutter and was thinking if I made it so I could have the insert mounted on one side at the 90 deg angle on one side and at a 45 deg angle on the other side and use the insert in which ever mounting spot I need it may be a handy tool.

I like this idea. If you make one post some pics for us
I can think of several ways a tool like this could be a time saver

Peter.
04-08-2010, 01:18 PM
Peter what insert is that? I may have to make one of those. It looks
like a "solution waiting for a problem" to me. :-) I like to build things
like that just for the fun of it.
...Lew...

Lew they are TNMP 220412 inserts. They are some of the cheapest on eBay (http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/TNMG-TNMP-220412-ISCAR-INSERTS_W0QQitemZ200266129096QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK _Home_Garden_PowerTools_SM?hash=item2ea0ca9ec8):