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dp
04-12-2010, 02:05 AM
Last year I bought a HF 6" buffer. The wheels it came with seem to have much in common with pixie dust as bits of them fly everywhere. No amount of waxing those wheels prevents the snowstorm that a buffing session generates. So who makes good wheels and how does one prep them to last?

My desire is to use one wheel with rouge and the other wheel to work off sanding/filing marks, excluding serious gouges that no amount of buffing is going to correct.

macona
04-12-2010, 02:52 AM
Even with name brand wheels I am covered in white after a buffing session.

Black_Moons
04-12-2010, 03:28 AM
Would'nt that be how the wheel sheds used up compound and dirt/polishing debrie?

wierdscience
04-12-2010, 03:49 AM
McMaster-Carr sells a good selection of buffing wheels and similar products.Spiral sewn cotton is good for general purpose buffing and spiral sewn sissal works good for rough work.

http://www.mcmaster.com/#buffing-wheels/=6mh4n7

The larger diameter buff you can use and the lower speed you can use them at means the maximum life span of the wheel and less heat generated in the work.

It's still dirty work,they also sell Tyvek suits and face sheilds:)

smiller6912
04-12-2010, 08:44 AM
Try Caswell ( http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs/index.html ).
They have some on-line manuals and great tech help. I use them for all of my buffing and plating supplies.

SGW
04-12-2010, 09:43 AM
www.brownells.com has good buffiing supplies, and their "Gunsmith Kinks #1" book has good information about buffing.

dvbydt
04-12-2010, 10:11 AM
If you want a mirror finish, then cotton and rouge. My vote goes for Scotch-Brite deburring wheels grade 7SFN, 6" dia x 1" wide. No mess and a finish about the same as 600 grit. They cost more but last me about 2-3 years and did I mention no fluff.

IanR

Punkinhead
04-12-2010, 10:21 AM
Four coarse work I like to make my own wheels by gluing up dense paper or cardboard too the desired thickness then drilling an arbor hole and turning to the right diameter. They take a charge of polishing compound well and are a good stiffness for getting rid of grinding marks. The paper from hanging file folders works well. Plain old elmer's works fine to glue them up.
Since they're free I made several thicknesses and profiles.

Kirbot
04-12-2010, 11:08 AM
Not all buffing wheels shed to much fluff.
I have a selection of old wheels that I've picked up at fleamarkets and auctions, and only one or two out of about 12 or 15 does much sheding.

I don't know about a modern brand that good though.

I rake the wheel to clear out the old compound whenever I use them, then just keep adding compound.

I would rather rake now and then, than get covered with fluff whenever I use them.

jeremy13
04-12-2010, 12:49 PM
I'm just now getting in to the buffing realm. What kind of wheal do I start with for removing casting marks in aluminum. I want to take factory engine parts and polish them up.

Jim Stabe
04-12-2010, 01:05 PM
If you want a mirror finish, then cotton and rouge. My vote goes for Scotch-Brite deburring wheels grade 7SFN, 6" dia x 1" wide. No mess and a finish about the same as 600 grit. They cost more but last me about 2-3 years and did I mention no fluff.

IanR
Where do you buy the Scotchbrite wheels?

dvbydt
04-12-2010, 02:59 PM
Where do you buy the Scotchbrite wheels?


In the UK - MSC/J&L. Would you like a photo of the finish?

IanR

dp
04-12-2010, 03:22 PM
The wheels I have are woven similar to this image: http://www.nebraskahistory.org/images/sites/mnh/quilts_a_z/warps-wefts.jpg

That causes whole threads to sling loose which is what Macona described. This is what made me wonder if there are wheels with a better weave or possible a knit that will stay together.

Jim Stabe
04-12-2010, 05:43 PM
In the UK - MSC/J&L. Would you like a photo of the finish?

IanR
If it's not too much trouble

wierdscience
04-12-2010, 10:14 PM
The wheels I have are woven similar to this image: http://www.nebraskahistory.org/images/sites/mnh/quilts_a_z/warps-wefts.jpg

That causes whole threads to sling loose which is what Macona described. This is what made me wonder if there are wheels with a better weave or possible a knit that will stay together.

Are the wheels you have spiral sewn like this one?

http://img.tradeindia.com/fp/1/416/430.jpg

dp
04-13-2010, 12:08 AM
That's not a spiral, but yes, that is the stitching pattern.

dvbydt
04-13-2010, 07:04 AM
If it's not too much trouble

Jim,

No problem.

http://i757.photobucket.com/albums/xx213/dvbydt/Engineering/Brass.jpg

One inch diameter brass bar, the bands are :-
Stock
320 grit
Scotchbrite wheel
A lick with "Brasso" metal polish

Works just the same on aluminium and stainless steel.

The wheels are available in different sizes and grades but I have only used the 6" x 1" grade 7SF.

IanR

Jim Stabe
04-13-2010, 11:27 AM
Jim,

No problem.

http://i757.photobucket.com/albums/xx213/dvbydt/Engineering/Brass.jpg

One inch diameter brass bar, the bands are :-
Stock
320 grit
Scotchbrite wheel
A lick with "Brasso" metal polish

Works just the same on aluminium and stainless steel.

The wheels are available in different sizes and grades but I have only used the 6" x 1" grade 7SF.

IanR
Nice! I'll have to find one