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DougA
05-07-2010, 07:17 AM
Hey fellows. I am considering purchasing a proper service truck. I currently drive an extended cab Dodge Dakota with a hard tonneau cover. I do machinery repair and carry a selection of tools and parts with me. I am considering buying a used diesel truck with either a contractors cap on it or preferably a full service box on it. I am looking for your thoughts on Dodge, Chev, or Ford trucks for reliability and fuel economy. I drive around 60,000 KMs per year. Whats everyone thoughts and experiences.



Doug

BigBoy1
05-07-2010, 07:43 AM
I have a diesel powered 2005 Ford F-250 Super Duty crew cab pickup truck and I have been totally pleased with it. It has done everything I have asked of it and have no regrets for buying it. I'm getting about 16 miles/gallon with city driving and 19 mpg for higway driving. I enjoy the roomyness and I have driven 14 hours and have not been tired as it is a very smooth riding and comfortable truck. Just my $0.02.

Phil McCrackin
05-07-2010, 07:55 AM
I have a 2006 Ram 2500, 6speed, Cummins and couldn't be happier with it. Very reliable, pulls very well and the mileage is about 16-18 in the city, towing my boat (about 5,000 pounds at 70 mph) 12-14 mpg.

The best I have ever done is 22 mpg, unloaded, at 60 mph, which doesn't happen very often.

Just remember, diesel is higher than gas now for whatever reason.

Your Old Dog
05-07-2010, 08:30 AM
If you plan on carrying any weight, you can't go wrong with a older Ford F250/350 with International Harvestor 7.3 litre Turbo charged Power Stroke Diesel. They are no longer offered and must be purchased used. Bear in mind, the International Harvestor 7.3 litre Turbo charged Power Stroke Diesel is the same engine in virtually every school bus in America. Pulls my 7500 lb travel trailer like theres nothing there ONCE YOU GET THE R's UP !!! Hell, I even like the name of the International Harvestor 7.3 litre Turbo charged Power Stroke Diesel !!! Run with the Big Dogs, go with a International Harvestor 7.3 litre Turbo charged Power Stroke Diesel

DougA
05-07-2010, 09:28 AM
My brothers company has a GMC duramax diesel. What got me thinking about these trucks is we used it to tow a office trailer with it I was really impressed with the power and fuel economy while towing. Seemed fairly quiet too.

wierdscience
05-07-2010, 10:00 AM
Me,I wouldn't buy any of the one-tons from the big three,they are all building overpriced junk now.Cheap plastic everywhere,paper thin frames and crummy electricals.

Duramax,lot of those around here,mostly good,injector and pump problems start at 90,000 on some of them,not cheap after the warranty runs out.Isuzu built engine.If a guy works out of it the dash,door handles and seats start to fall apart quick.Cheap plastic and Mexican electricals everywhere.Other than that they do pull good.

Dodge,they ain't what they used to be,but screwing up a good product is what Chrysler is famous for.

Ford,best bodys in the biz,last engine choice sucked,dunno about the new one.

If I wanted a work/ride around I would go with a 3/4-1 ton.If it were gonna be a work only pack a load with no complaints the Isuzu N-series would be it-

http://www.isuzucv.com/nseries/index.html

Lot more truck for the same money as a 1Ton diesel.Most of the field mechanics here are going to them now that the big three 1 tons have priced themselves out of the market.

That and once you get a tool body,welder,compressor and tools on a 1Ton the fuel economy sucks.A friend bought one to replace his Duramax.He ended up with a bigger tool body,added a bigger welder and compressor,plus he added a crane to one corner.At 11mpg the N-series does 1-1/2mpg better than his Duramax did and the sticker price was the same.

Dr Stan
05-07-2010, 10:41 AM
FYI the Duramax diesel is designed and built by Isuzu for GM. Therefore any problems with the GM Duramax are also in the Isuzu engines for they are the same.

That said, any of the Ford, Dodge, or GM diesel powered PU's are well built vehicles. Find one that suits your needs and go with it. Just remember a diesel requires more diligence in its "care & feeding" than a gasoline powered engine.

vpt
05-07-2010, 11:08 AM
If you plan on carrying any weight, you can't go wrong with a older Ford F250/350 with International Harvestor 7.3 litre Turbo charged Power Stroke Diesel. They are no longer offered and must be purchased used. Bear in mind, the International Harvestor 7.3 litre Turbo charged Power Stroke Diesel is the same engine in virtually every school bus in America. Pulls my 7500 lb travel trailer like theres nothing there ONCE YOU GET THE R's UP !!! Hell, I even like the name of the International Harvestor 7.3 litre Turbo charged Power Stroke Diesel !!! Run with the Big Dogs, go with a International Harvestor 7.3 litre Turbo charged Power Stroke Diesel



They are better known as navistar when they switched over to turbos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Harvester_S-Series_%28bus_chassis%29

Steve Seebold
05-07-2010, 11:45 AM
I have a Ford F250 I bought new in June 2002. I put 102,000 miles on it in the first 3 years, now it has over 220,000 and still runs like a brand new truck. I got 82,000 miles on the factory tires, and about 110,000 on the factory brakes. At 70 MPH, I get 22 MPG, but above 70 it falls off pretty rapidly (80 MPH=16 MPG) I did have to put in a transmission at about 190,000. That's the only problem I have had with it.

The truck has the Lariat interior, so it's more like a luxury car in a truck body.

For my money, there are no trucks made other than FORD.

hardtail
05-07-2010, 11:53 AM
Lot of oil field companies choose Ford for their chassis's, seem higher and the lines are tucked up better, go 7.3 but it's gonna be an older unit, the 6.0L had numerous issues and you have to pull the cab for an engine swap....

Dodge, go with 5.9, great engine, some 98.5-2002~ had some core thickness problems in the blocks but they should have surfaced by now.......lighter front ends, wear out quicker

GM good power and economy, lots love the Allison, stay with 04-06 for the updated accessible injectors, 06 tranny was a 6spd and they got rid of those crappy accordian mirrors, 07 the mileage went down w emissions crap......lines leak where they crimp

terry_g
05-07-2010, 12:17 PM
I am a fleet mechanic and look after several diesel service trucks and pickups. My current service truck is a 99 Chev cube van with a 6.5 diesel it weighs 9600 Lbs
and gets about 14 miles per gallon it has lots of power.
It developed an occasional missfire so the injection pump sent out for repair. Last march the pump driver module failed which I understand is a common problem.
My truck is the only GM in the fleet that I look after.

The 7.3 diesel in the older Fords has been a good trouble free engine I maintain one that has over 200,000 miles on it and I have replaced the cam sensor and a glow plug solenoid.
Ford's 6 litre engine has had problems with the EGR cooler when it fails it can cause the engine to over heat damaging the head gaskets. Fords flat rate on a head gasket replacement
is 23 hours as they claim the cab has to be removed.

I look after four Dodge diesel pickups and they have been the least trouble. One some how got water in the fuel and the driver did nor realize what the Water In Fuel light meant and drove
it until it would barely run. Cummins electronic injectors are expensive.
Dodge has fairly light frame cross members and the linkages that hold the front axle in place are easily bent if you go off road.
A company I used to work for had two Dodge service trucks with aluminium service bodys and AutoCranes always overloaded with tools and parts. We tortured those trucks chasing logging
machinery on rough mountain roads and skid trails. I was amazed how well they stood up. The brakes were marginal and wore out often gave more than one of us a good scare.
They replaced the Dodges in the late 90s with Ford F450 4x4s with 7.3 Powerstroke Diesels bigger service bodies and larger Autocranes.
The Fords had good brakes and lots of power and stood up very well they were noticably quiter to ride in as well.

A friend of mine has a 550 GM 4x4 with service body and crane it has a Duramax diesel and has worked well for him. The head gaskets failed and both heads had to be replaced.
The repair was done under warranty but the truck was down for almost two weeks. A major inconvenience.
I understand that Duramax head gaskets can be a problem.

If I was looking for a service truck a ford F450 with a 7.3 would be first on my list followed by a Dodge with a 5.9 cummins.

Most one ton dually trucks once the service body has been installed and a lifting device and tools and equipment loaded are usually pretty close to their max GVW limiting what you can haul and making the brakes work harder.

If you get a truck with a service body and the fuel filler goes through the body behind the rear tire like most do. Pay close attention to it as any leakage can put water it the fuel tank. I have seen this happen several times.
Expensive with a diesel engine.

Hope this helps
Terry

vpt
05-07-2010, 12:55 PM
The egr system on the 6.0 can be deleted and I believe there are kits even on ebay to do this. However I have heard all kinds of stories about the head studs being to small or to few which also causes the head gaskets to fail.


Our 7.3 turbo got a new injector pump at 250K miles and new lifters at 350K miles. Besides that the only work I have had to do was rust repair on the truck. Gas tanks (front one twice) fuel lines, brake lines, oil pan, oil cooler twice, pass. side exhaust manifold, etc.

Our 86 6.9 ford was the best by far! Replaced the injector pump at 300K miles and the oil cooler around the same time. The only other thing was the normal glow plug maintenance and that has been it for that truck which now has 450K miles on it. That truck has been retired from the fleet and now is used as a yard truck and for riding around.

We do need 2 new trucks in the fleet but have been scared to get any new fords because of so many problem they have been having with the new diesels.

The 6.0s blow head gaskets

The 6.4's are a nightmare to work on and I have heard stories of those motors having weird troubles with electronics.

The newest ford built diesel in the 2011 trucks has yet to be real life tested. We hope it is a good one or we may have to get a dodge. :eek:

saltmine
05-07-2010, 12:57 PM
When I worked in the County fleet shop, our supervisor (stupidvisor) decided we needed to go with one brand of trucks. Since the finance office refused to pay the price for Dodges, we got Fords. One by one, the old Chevy crew cabs with 6.5 diesels were surveyed out, replaced with Ford crew cabs sporting 6.0 Powerstroke (or is it powerjoke) diesels. About a week after the first Fords went into service, they started showing up in the shop with problems. We started taking them to the dealer...some had to be towed.
Fortunately, we still had a few of the old Chevys sitting in the storage yard, and put a couple of them to work as "loaners" until the assigned trucks came back from Ford. Once we had the whole road department driving Fords, we had a steady stream of them going to the dealer. We never had to have two guys to go get a Ford, because there was always two or three there that needed to be picked up. The old Chevys continued to soldier on, way past their survey mileage. I retired in 2006, and as far as I know, those old Chevy trucks are probably still hauling road crews around, to this day.

On a strange note; The boss bought one Chevy 1 ton, 4X4, diesel, with a utility body, in 2003. This truck has never been to the dealer, and has never been down for anything but scheduled maintenance...in 250,000 miles. It was still in use after I retired.

The supervisor, who happened to be a "dyed-in-the-wool" Dodge fanatic, finally got a few Dodge diesels in the fleet. He also talked the Sheriff into a bunch of Dodge Charger police cars. The trucks have been back to the dealer numerous times with seemingly unsolvable probems, they get stuck almost as soon as they get dirt on the tires, and ride worse than an empty dump truck.
The Chargers soon found work protecting the local Dodge dealer's service department from criminals. They too share the cement truck ride quality of the trucks. Fortunately, they get great gas mileage (sitting in the servce department waiting for repairs uses no fuel)

Seeing how well his favorite vehicles held up in fleet service, the supervisor promptly retired, and headed for parts unknown...in his Dodge truck.

BTW, Terry G. Your friend's Duramax most probably didn't blow it's head gaskets. GM engineers discovered some of the cylinder heads had been leaking coolant past their stainless steel injector sleeves. These leaks were mis-diagnosed as head gasket leaks. The redesigned heads have improved sealing....

BlindViper
05-07-2010, 02:52 PM
Adding to what has been said in this post I would get a 94-03 ford f350 with a 7.3 powerstroke. The 03-06 6.0 uhoh's are junk period. The 7.3 from a 94-97 truck has a service life from international of 400,000 miles. The 99-03 "superduty" trucks have a service life of 450,000 miles. The 03-06 has a service life of 250-300,000 miles. The 6.0 was a stop gap motor its replacement was already in development before it was even released. You can work on a 7.3 with very basic tools. The never 6.0 and 6.4 powerstrokes are so cramped its just a pain in the ass.

Guido
05-07-2010, 04:50 PM
What Terry G said X 2 X 2 X ------

New Bosch injectors for Cummins 5.9 are quoted 500 bucks/per each per Cummins/Dodge. One dose of water and you'll need all six. Be certain to filter fuel to 3 micron or better.

Diesel powered machines are built to last and last and last, PROVIDED they are properly maintained.

--G

saltmine
05-07-2010, 06:21 PM
One thing I didn't mention in my last post was the fact that Fords are not built to be serviced or repaired by normal human beings after 1999. Some of the guys have been lucky with the Powerstroke engines, but if they do need to go into the shop, don't plan on getting them back the same day. Most of them, starting around 1999, need to have the cab pulled off of the chassis in order to perform any repair work on them. Ford definitely didn't do their homework on these trucks.

The 7.3 was probably the last good engine Ford had. I remember out at the Proving Ground the 6.4's liked to gas the drivers with exhaust leaks, and blow the whole turbo assembly off, putting a big dent in the hood.

Hot Bob
05-07-2010, 06:46 PM
I live in Texas, the dually capitol of the world. You will see three Dodges to every other Ford, Chevy, or GMC (dually) even though they cost more. I am not a fan of the Fords. Every diesel service technitian I've ever spoke to has said to stay away from them. I looked at the GM products and Dodges when I decided I needed a dually. My preference was for the Dodge but I liked the Chevs and GMCs also. I ended up buying a 2004 Dodge 3500 quad cab with the 5.9l Cummins. I've been mostly happy with it. My mileage computer always settles in showing average consumption of around 21.3 MPG. It is my daily driver and it is usually unloaded. I do however pull a 3-horse gooseneck with living quarters on the weekends (short trips). One thing I don't like about it is that it seems aligning the front end is not possible. I've had it checked twice at different shops and both said it was within specs however, I replace front tires at about 30,000 miles because of edge wear. I know it is not shocks or air pressure. Perhaps it is the brand of tire, but I doubt it. I've been told by my farrier that I bought the last good year of these trucks. He only buys Dodge 3500's and gets a new one each year. Says the drivetrains changed in 2005 and have had bugs since.

Bob

Hot Bob
05-07-2010, 06:51 PM
One thing I didn't mention in my last post was the fact that Fords are not built to be serviced or repaired by normal human beings after 1999. Some of the guys have been lucky with the Powerstroke engines, but if they do need to go into the shop, don't plan on getting them back the same day. Most of them, starting around 1999, need to have the cab pulled off of the chassis in order to perform any repair work on them. Ford definitely didn't do their homework on these trucks.

The 7.3 was probably the last good engine Ford had. I remember out at the Proving Ground the 6.4's liked to gas the drivers with exhaust leaks, and blow the whole turbo assembly off, putting a big dent in the hood.

Saltmine, it sounds like you've been in Kingman for a while. I grew up there. Graduated H.S. in '85.

Bob

MasterMaker
05-07-2010, 06:52 PM
I'm going to trow in my 0.02 worth from a scandinavian perspective and suggest a mitsubishi l200 series(new).

Cheap to run even with the turbocharged engine(how the **** does the american motor-industry manage to get so little horsepower from such huge engines anyway), very terrain capable, great warranty(5 years or 100.000km here in Norway) and plenty big enough(even for me).

wierdscience
05-07-2010, 07:01 PM
FYI the Duramax diesel is designed and built by Isuzu for GM. Therefore any problems with the GM Duramax are also in the Isuzu engines for they are the same.

.

That's what I said,the Duramax engine is built by Isuzu,but it's a clean sheet design and a V-8 built for GM.They aren't bad engines at all,just some of the earlier ones had injection troubles.

The diesel engines in the Isuzu N and F series trucks are inline four and six cylinder respectively and have been on the road many years and logged literally billions of miles in quite a few countries.

saltmine
05-07-2010, 10:39 PM
No, Bob, I'm not a long time resident, maybe 20 years in Kingman at the most. I grew up in the Midwest and my folks moved to California when I was in my teens. Yeah, before you laugh, I'm from the "left coast". I moved to Kingman when it started getting too expensive to live in Southern Calif.
Kingman was a brutal change for me, but it was a darn site cheaper to live here. I think I finally got used to driving to Phoenix or Las Vegas when I want to do any shopping....
When I went to work for the County fleet, they had just about everything "shade treed" to death. We were running service calls every night, and we towed a lot of cars...When I retired, we had a service call once a month, if we were busy. Unfortunately, after I left, the number and frequency of service calls after hours increased dramatically.

We didn't have much luck with Dodges in the fleet, though, and the dealer didn't help with their crew of guessnosticians and parts swappers.

Rattrap
05-07-2010, 11:45 PM
The supervisor, who happened to be a "dyed-in-the-wool" Dodge fanatic...


After lurking this forum two years and reading many of your automotive-related posts, it is safe to say that biased opinions span all makes and models of the automotive world. It isn't hard to suspect that somewhere long ago, a fellow driving a Ford, or God forbid, a Dodge, handed you your GM doors. You grew up in the midwest? Shoot, it might have been me :D

I think you'll be hard-pressed to find many people who share your reverence for the GM 6.5 diesel. I average several calls a year from unfortunate owners who are looking for an engine or someone to do a gas engine conversion. Nary a call from the Ford or Dodge guys, for some reason.

Others have posted accounts of their ownership of the various diesel trucks. Diesel pickups have come a long way since the Olds that couldn't decide if it was a gas or diesel and the equally sorry and underpowered, but more reliable Mitsu-powered Dodges.

The OP would be well-advised to peruse the various diesel truck forums to gather information from experienced owners so he can make an educated decision. All three makes have their strengths and weaknesses.

BTW, the local GM "guessnosticians" routinely lift the cabs off the frame when doing Duramax head removal. It is actually a pretty quick maneuver, once you get the hang of it.

Just so you don't get the idea I'm prejudiced, one of my favorite cars at Drag Week a couple years ago was a Duramax powered Mustang that drove 1300 miles from TX and ripped off some traction-plagued 10.40s. Too bad he didn't put that engine in a Camaro, huh?:eek:

Your Old Dog
05-08-2010, 09:22 AM
This has been a useful thread to me. I've wanted to get a new pickup to retire with but didn't know what would compete well with my present 7.3 liter diesel. Turns out none of you guys seem to agree on one so it looks like pretty much a crap shoot. I want "FULL" creature comfort as this ain't for work and a good puller for the travel trailer that I know won't leave me flat on the desert somewhere.

Dr Stan
05-08-2010, 09:27 AM
I want "FULL" creature comfort as this ain't for work and a good puller for the travel trailer that I know won't leave me flat on the desert somewhere.

When I visited a RV manufacturer in Nebraska they were recommending Dodge one ton dulleys with the Cummings turbo as the tow vehicle.

barts
05-08-2010, 12:15 PM
This has been a useful thread to me. I've wanted to get a new pickup to retire with but didn't know what would compete well with my present 7.3 liter diesel. Turns out none of you guys seem to agree on one so it looks like pretty much a crap shoot. I want "FULL" creature comfort as this ain't for work and a good puller for the travel trailer that I know won't leave me flat on the desert somewhere.

When I bought my '96 7.3L Ford I'd test driven all of them... see which one you like to drive.

Test drive that new Ford.. it's pretty amazing. No data on that new engine, yet, of course, but it sounds like a healthy beast. I bought my Powerstroke the first year it came out, and have been very happy w/ the whole truck.

- Bart

HighWall
05-08-2010, 01:49 PM
I have a Ford F250 I bought new in June 2002. I put 102,000 miles on it in the first 3 years, now it has over 220,000 and still runs like a brand new truck. I got 82,000 miles on the factory tires, and about 110,000 on the factory brakes. At 70 MPH, I get 22 MPG, but above 70 it falls off pretty rapidly (80 MPH=16 MPG) I did have to put in a transmission at about 190,000. That's the only problem I have had with it.

The truck has the Lariat interior, so it's more like a luxury car in a truck body.

For my money, there are no trucks made other than FORD.

Same here. 2002 F-250 SuperCab 4x4. No issues, but it doesn't have quite as high mileage as yours does. Probably the best vehicle I've owned.

DougA
05-08-2010, 02:47 PM
I'd like to have the truck for awhile so I am looking at the 2006 - 2009. I don't buy new vehicles but with the miles I put on one I can't see myself buying an older truck. I spend more time driving my truck then I do working most days so comfort is definitely a plus. Noise too. Any find one brand of truck louder then the rest?

This does seem like a really mixed bag none really stand out from the opinions. I do see lots of fleet trucks around here that are ford but I think that may be do to price.

saltmine
05-08-2010, 03:04 PM
Knowing "the big three" intimately, I would put my vote on the Dodge, for the noisiest trucks. Their sound deadening materials inside the cab are so thin you can almost see through them, and the Cummins Turbo diesel sounds like a cement mixer full of cobblestones.

I seem to recall an interview with Jack Roush (the original guy who was the first to put Cummins engine in a Dodge pickup) He says the #1 Cummins conversion was so noisy, they ended up putting 1000 lbs of sound deadening in the body, front fenders, hood, and even inside the engine itself.

Dodge cabs are like beer cans anyway. (try it some time, you can put a dull screwdriver right through the door of a Dodge, but you can't on a Ford or GM) They were trying to save weight, so they stamped out the cabs, hoods, and doors from thinner steel.

Ford and GM diesels are difficult to tell from their gas engined counterparts, but the Duramax is probably the quietest. I don't know about their new, all Ford diesel, though. If the rumors are true, and Ford did actually copy the Isuzu design....yeah, it would be pretty quiet.

Note to Rattrap: from KY, eh? Isn't that where the movie "Deliverance" was supposed to take place?

Fleet trucks sales depend solely on the "bottom line", Doug. Nobody choses a fleet truck because it's better than the others, or because it's more reliable, it's all $$$
That's why you see a lot of Ford fleet trucks.

lynnl
05-08-2010, 03:22 PM
I think "Deliverance" (movie) was depicting an area of north Georgia.
I think it was shot there too, but am not sure of that.

torker
05-08-2010, 03:34 PM
Before Christmas...I bought a 1995 F350 4x4 with a 7.3 and 5 sp.
Thing amazes me. I had been travelling out to Saskatchewan to move my stuff out there with my old Chevy with 454.
Typical one way trip was about $400 in gas.
This truck...wow...more power...and the average trip costs about $170
Yep...the ol Chevy got HORRID mileage...but this truck is a dream.
It pulls my 4 horse trailer full of 1200 pound horses up steep hills like it's not even there.
My next truck will be a little newer..I'd like a 2002 crew dually 4x4 with the last year of the 7.3.
I've even found one...it has 64,000 k's on it.
It is NOT FOR SALE...yet...
Only thing I don't like...for short trips etc...a gas vehicle is better. Takes awhile to warm a diesel up properly and starters are worth a fortune...so you find you leave them idling more than a gas job.
Russ

hardtail
05-08-2010, 10:54 PM
Russ has it nailed there, diesel is a heat compression engine, get in and work it for 10 hrs, once had a refer tech tell me he wanted a Dodge dually for camping, what do you pull I asked, a tent trailer it's tough with the minvan, what other things would it be used for, going down to the corner store on occasion.........dead wrong on needing a diesel dually for that......

The Duramax IS the quietest......sounds like a noisy gasser, Ford has the best turbo whistle.......when my buddy got his 06 Dmax and put a few miles on it and took me for a ride I couldn't believe the power then he finally pulled 12 cows to auction and that really woke it up.......ride is great, but I'm a bowtie guy........

I agree on the price spec, 2 reasons Chev was never #1, the sales figures divided Chev and GMC as 2 different trucks and Fords are cheap........

saltmine
05-09-2010, 12:23 AM
That's one thing Dodge learned from the Nazi's. Everything they have is way overpriced.

Willy
05-09-2010, 01:31 AM
Salthole, give it a rest already!:rolleyes:

Twmaster
05-09-2010, 02:23 AM
That's what I said,the Duramax engine is built by Isuzu,but it's a clean sheet design and a V-8 built for GM.They aren't bad engines at all,just some of the earlier ones had injection troubles.

The diesel engines in the Isuzu N and F series trucks are inline four and six cylinder respectively and have been on the road many years and logged literally billions of miles in quite a few countries.

I'll second this. The Duramax is not even close to the same other than designed by Isuzu.

Early D-Max did have injector issues. These have been solved.

I just sold a 2007 C5500 with >200K miles. 6600 Duramax. No issues. Only ever saw a warranty claim for an EGR valve.

Isuzu N and F series trucks are great also. I've put many miles in those.

If looking for a used truck the Ford with the 7.3L Power Stroke is a terrific ride but are getting harder to find in really great shape. (I'm picky)

If I were able to afford a new pickup I'd be in a Silverado with a Durmax/Allison power train.

Rattrap
05-09-2010, 02:28 AM
Knowing "the big three" intimately, I would put my vote on the Dodge, for the noisiest trucks.

Speaking from my personal experience, yeah. I own a 12 valve and an early 24 valve. Only the Dodge car I've owned 40 years is noisier than the 12 valve. But the OP isn't looking at pre '98 trucks, anyway. Personally, I don't mind the noise. But then, I'm used to noisy Dodges. Sorta like it, as a matter of fact.

Do you currently own a diesel pickup?


Dodge cabs are like beer cans anyway. (try it some time, you can put a dull screwdriver right through the door of a Dodge, but you can't on a Ford or GM)

Just to keep this objective, could you provide some factual data? What you say may be true. I haven't measured the thickness of the metal in the doors of any of the three you mention. Have you? As an aside, the last Chevy truck I owned, of several, could have a screwdriver easily punched, handle first, through many places on the body. I used to joke that it got faster every year.



Note to Rattrap: from KY, eh? Isn't that where the movie "Deliverance" was supposed to take place?


I have never seen "Deliverance", nor do I know any of the specifics regarding the plot or filming location. Besides what you may have seen on Jerry Springer's show, what do you know about the people in KY? It is apparent your prejudices aren't limited to auto manufacturers. Ad hominem insults contribute nothing to your credibility and will receive no further response from me.

I suppose I too have a somewhat intimate knowledge of the various (more than the big three) automakers. I've owned and raced a variety of makes and models of car the past 40 years in addition to building lots of engines for other people. N/A, blown, turbocharged, N2O injected, Ford, Mopar and Chevy. Every time someone walks in my shop talking smack about how his car is best because it's a certain make, I just smile. "What a fool believes...." Sort of like a person who thinks all mills that aren't Bridgeports are junk.

I'm not here to wave the banner for Dodge. I don't care if they never sell another truck. But the OP deserves objective information. To portray any of the three he's considering as totally junk and unworthy of consideration is disingenuous, at best. :rolleyes:

I'll reiterate my original suggestion that he expand his fact-gathering efforts to other forums.

DougA
05-09-2010, 07:24 AM
I don't currently drive a diesel truck. When we started the business I put a hard tonneau cover on my 2001 Dakota extended cab (which I love) and called it a service truck. I have the box packed with tools and parts. They are difficult to access and after checking out the truck my brother works out of doing garage door installs I fell in love with the service box on it. If my Dakota was diesel and had a service box I wouldn't be looking for a replacement. But with the tool load and occasional towing I do a full size truck seems to be the smart move. I guess I will look around for a truck forum that is not specific to any make.

Your Old Dog
05-09-2010, 09:08 AM
I've toyed with the idea of getting my 2002 F350 extended cab completely redone. My guess is it would cost about 1/3d the cost of a new one. It desperately needs soundproofing even though it's the Lariat version. The door seals let in a lot of noise. The body needs a little attention as well.

This truck rarely moves out of the drive except to haul the travel trailer. In fact I have to keep a battery tender on it. It's just to expensive to drive for routine trips. I take the Harley or the car when I have it. Because I live in the country, a 1/4" drill bit would cost me about $20.00 at $3.10 per gallon and 13 mpg!! The same trip on the Harley at about 40 miles per smile would only cost about $4.00 :D
(heads up for the non-informed: Not good form to criticize a mans choice of wife, religion or car as he has a lot invested in all of them. The heat in the kitchen saying doesn't hold up well on these topics where gentlemen are concerned. Care is called for when approaching these topics.)

hardtail
05-09-2010, 03:10 PM
The last Excello mill I picked up was from a big transmission shop supplying Western Canada, I was interested in the GM product so was inquiring about how the Allisons were, he showed me the weak spot, then about which were the best?.......His answer was they all fail, guys chip em and then pin up to a 17K gooseneck and bag the crap outa them.....they all finally fry........